Marketing Psychology Question

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Do you know what the term is for when a consumer changes their opinion of a brand based on exposure to advertising and social pressure? Is this reframing values or is there another term?
#marketing #psychology #question
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan AFFMark
    Brand awareness maybe?
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    • Profile picture of the author Odahh
      Well if it is your advertising that changes their opinion or create the pressure via your marketing plan . And leads to you profiting. It's called success

      Just to keep things simple .

      Now if your gilete razors and one add drive away many life long customers and leads to hundreds of millions in lossess . That is called a total #$&@ up.

      Ok gilets net losses because of those adds was 5.2 billion
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  • Profile picture of the author RikiTTotal
    If a consumers initial response is one of displease, towards a product or service, but then changes their opinion after seeing the product or service being utilised by someone. What mechanism describes this process of change? (This is for a client presentation, so I'm trying to find the academic terminology for the behavioural change and maybe some research I can work into my pitch.)
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    • Profile picture of the author SARubin
      Originally Posted by RikiTTotal View Post

      Do you know what the term is for when a consumer changes their opinion of a brand based on exposure to advertising and social pressure? Is this reframing values or is there another term?
      Reframing values rarely (if ever) comes about from advertisements. From social pressure, maybe. But even then it often morphs into resistant compliance rather than a true paradigm shift.


      Originally Posted by RikiTTotal View Post

      If a consumers initial response is one of displease, towards a product or service, but then changes their opinion after seeing the product or service being utilised by someone. What mechanism describes this process of change? (This is for a client presentation, so I'm trying to find the academic terminology for the behavioural change and maybe some research I can work into my pitch.)
      It could be a simple matter of timing? Maybe they didn't feel a need for what you're selling (no interest) until one day they do have a need. Then they see your ad and decide to give it a try because the promise of relief is better than suffering, or someone recommends it and they take that as a sign of virtue?


      Or it could be a matter of familiarity bias? When they first see the product it's an unknown (untrusted) company. Then after a period of time, along with seeing others use it, it becomes more familiar. And in the absence of negative press, it becomes more trustworthy and worth trying.


      It could also be a simple matter of social conformity? Many people don't want to be in the first group to try something. But after they see others doing it, then they don't want to be left out.


      Unless they have a desperate need, most people who act the way you're describing are usually in the "majority" to Laggards" group of adaptation...

      The basic movement of adaptation is typically...


      Innovators (usually a very small percentage of people) - Innovators are the first to adopt a new technology. They're willing to take risks in order to be on the cutting edge, and they like to try all the newest and coolest stuff.

      Early Adopters This is the second group of people to adopt the new innovation. Very often celebrities or opinion leaders (sometimes called influencers) fall into this category.
      They usually don't want to waste effort on unproven technology, but once they see a few innovators start using it, early adopters are the next group to join in.

      Majority (here's where things start to get exciting) - This is the largest group, and this group sets the viral conformity movement into action. I've seen a few studies where researchers break this category into 2 segments ("early majority" and "late majority") but personally, I think it makes more sense to view it as a continual flow, because where do we draw the line?

      These are the people who see the early adopters and opinion leaders showing off the latest thing, and then they start to jump on the bandwagon. This is where stuff goes viral.

      Laggards Finally we have the laggards. These guys typically have an aversion to risk or change. (if it aint broke... don't fix it) But once they see everybody else doing it, then they're willing to give it a try. Or they simply don't want to be left behind (think of the senior citizen who dislikes technology, but finally ends up buying a computer or a smartphone)



      I've read dozens of books on these topics, and have also been privileged to be part of a research study (with people who are much smarter than I am) on social influence. So some of what I'm saying here is blended from multiple sources. But if you're looking for a place to start your research here's a wikipedia page on adaptation that (if you chase the references down the rabbit hole) should keep you busy for a few days...

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffus...ers1962_5th_ed


      Or if you just want to delve into the power of social conformity, you can start here...
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conformity


      I've got a bunch more, but your question is a bit generic. So without more specific details I can only give you a basic response.


      Anyway, hope it helps you on your journey...
      .
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  • Profile picture of the author Odahh
    So you are trying to refine the entire marketing or sales process down to one line or an academic phrase.

    It called the marketing system or sales process and I doubt there is one single moment but a build up of moments.

    But maybe there is another term
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  • Profile picture of the author dburk
    Hi RikiTTotal,

    Perhaps the term you are looking for is "Brand Amplification". In Social Media Marketing brand amplification is often the prime objective. It can cut both ways, negative or positive, so brand amplification is only positive when your established brand image is also positive.

    Or, perhaps you are looking for the term "Brand Experience", more frequently called "Customer Experience" in marketing parlance.

    HTH,

    Don Burk
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  • Profile picture of the author glmmstf57
    Hello, Thank you for your question.
    Let's say the term you are looking for is a "new band app". Brand enhancement is often the main object in social media marketing. This can be cut both negative or positive, which is only positive if the brand image you have established is positive. Consumer psychology plays an important role in marketing and understanding the person's useful and aspirations and what motivates specific buyers to purchase certain products.

    Best of regard's
    Golam Mostafa
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  • Gotta figure you prolly got the ansah already.

    For sure, there is all kindsa 'academic' terminology an' reasonin' -- an' the Rubester's cogent synopsis of the Innovator-Laggard axis is real helpful here -- but what mattahs evry time is your client.

    So the mechanism that (most aptly & relevantly) describes this process of change (or anythin' else your client demands) don't necessarily gotta conform to no pre-defined arrangement.

    Remembah: when you stop by the doc for a problem with your ASS, likely she got a zillion & one super academic Latin names for that familiar friend nowan don't evah USE.

    So ... don't try to blind your client with sclence (less'n actschwlly they hot for tech stuffs) bcs that is less to do with them & more to do with you.

    Plus also, behavioural change ain't nuthin' special to marketers or psycho types -- it is what happens evry day, in evry family, regulah as clockwork.

    So ... what is the unfancyest thing you can say?

    I would mebbe run with a simple pitch ...

    "Everyone has preferences. For what they do and what they think and what they buy. And sometimes these preferences say NO ... that's not for me. So why look in on cat products when you own a dog? Why care about life insurance when you're 18yo and ripe for adventure? Why buy Microsoft when your lifestyle runs on Apple? I guess the thing is ... times and desires change. It's why the seniors in your family don't scamp about like puppies anymore and the 15yos are wising up real fast. Smart brands understand this. Which is why they fight hard to keep their devotees and seek always to capture new interest ..."

    I jus' writin' random here, mebbe buildin' sum kinda picture -- but what I ani't dowin' is usin' no high-falutin' technical terms to explain to my imaginary client how I sumhow know what I talkin' about.
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  • Profile picture of the author aarathi s
    A person switching from a particular brand to competitor brand is known as Brand Switching.It happens due to many reasons.Mere advertisement cant change a persons opinion about a product, but it influences them.
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