Shook hands with a Multi Millionaire today - Got advice.

19 replies
Shook hands with a multi millionaire today.

(I'm employed so this is the VP of the company I work for - obviously not my internet business)

I shook hands with a company VP today at his retirement reception. I waited in line for about 15 minutes to shake his hand. Most of the other people shaking hands knew him. When I got to the front I shook his hand and said congratulations and then shook his wifes hand and he made a point to read my badge and address me by first name.
Then I popped the question I had prepared:

Me: "When you started here at this company 37 years ago, did you imagine this?". (By "this" I meant this retirement reception or this high station in the company, I didn't care.)

He thought (it was obvious he didn't have a rote answer to this question) and he shook his head and said no. Then I asked his wife the same question and she said "oh no".

Me: "I think you said before that when you started you were at a somewhat low position right?" And then they got all animated and wholeheartedly agreed.

Him: "Oh I started at the very bottom ... I was a weenie ". (here he intentionally shook my hand and slipped me something as we were talking ... I kept staring right into his eyes and didn't look ... yet) Then she surprised him and me when she volunteered "you want to know how much he made when he first got here?"

He got a bit of a look of discomfort and she said "I remember ... " (slight pause)

Him: "fifteen thousand dollars" and I raised my eyebrows and nodded and we all shared appreciative looks (NOTE: I did the math and adjusted for inflation thats a totally normal salary for an engineer back then, but a TON less by any measure than he's making now (7Mil total package (1Mil salary 6Mil bonuses) according to the stock data I looked up)).

Me: "but I bet you had high hopes right?" and they both said yeah and he asked rhetorically "but doesnt everybody?".


*** Then he got pensive and sized me up and said something I'll never forget:

Him: "Look ... What you've got to do is ..."

"Don't let yourself hold yourself back".

I realized immediately that what he said was just like the material I've been studying about resistance. I said that I could tell that I was holding myself back a little bit at least (UPDATE: A LOT) but that I was going to tear that off right now and they were both very encouraging and enthusiastic and said "yes! go do that! You can do that!" as I left.


It was an incredibly memorable experience since its not everyday I receive genuine encouragement and some awesome applicable wisdom from a millionaire!

Anyway I wanted to share that experience and quote with all the Mind Warriors.

Have Fun & Make Money.


P.S. What did he slip to me when he shook my hand? A $1000 Bill!!! Not. It was a commemorative coin - its actually pretty cool, and an ideal reminder of the experience.
#advice #hands #millionaire #multi #quotes #shook #today
  • Profile picture of the author quercus5
    Thanks for the share! Cool story and definitely motivating for those of us not millionaires (yet!)
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    • Profile picture of the author Hattori
      Dang thats sweet!! I hope someday ill experience the moment you had that day!
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  • Profile picture of the author 100k
    Great starry bra.

    TL;DR

    Dont let yourself hold yourself back.

    Now write a ebook on this advice and become an millionaire like those other gurus that sell "common sense" self help books.
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    Rent this space.

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    • Profile picture of the author Judge Groovyman
      Originally Posted by quercus5 View Post

      Thanks for the share! Cool story and definitely motivating for those of us not millionaires (yet!)
      Thanks. I was hoping it would help motivate.

      Originally Posted by Hattori View Post

      Dang thats sweet!! I hope someday ill experience the moment you had that day!
      Thanks. I hope so too - it was quite a moment.

      Originally Posted by 100k View Post

      Great starry bra.

      Dont let yourself hold yourself back.
      Thanks. Those are words I'll never forget.
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  • Profile picture of the author beeswarn
    Don't let yourself hold yourself back.

    Nice guy with a nice way to say, "Get a haircut and start acting like a grownup."
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    • Profile picture of the author Judge Groovyman
      Originally Posted by beeswarn View Post

      Nice guy with a nice way to say, "Get a haircut and start acting like a grownup."

      Perhaps ... but I didn't get that impression from him.
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  • Profile picture of the author JoeUK
    Cool, I've met a few multi millionaire's none of which you would have guessed if you hadn't have known otherwise, all down to earth, working class people...
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    • Profile picture of the author Judge Groovyman
      Originally Posted by JoeUK View Post

      Cool, I've met a few multi millionaire's none of which you would have guessed if you hadn't have known otherwise, all down to earth, working class people...
      Thanks! Reminds me of that book 'The Millionaire Next Door' If I were to summarize it in a few words: you might be living next door to a Millionaire and not even know it because like you said: down to earth.
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  • Profile picture of the author brainstorm1
    I talk to millionaires on a pretty regular basis. Most of them are far humbler then they would seem.
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  • Profile picture of the author rubywylie
    pretty good share
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    • Profile picture of the author Judge Groovyman
      Originally Posted by brainstorm1 View Post

      I talk to millionaires on a pretty regular basis. Most of them are far humbler then they would seem.
      I'm getting that impression (about humility). So under what circumstances do you talk to millionaires regularly, is it online, or in your business?


      Originally Posted by rubywylie View Post

      pretty good share
      Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author vic alexander
    You know some people are intimidated to talk to rich people. They have this preconceived idea that they are going to be nasty because that's how they got rich. Rich people who have created their own wealth love it when people pick their brains like you did. It reminds them of their success and they are more than happy to talk. Rich people are some of the nicest people I have met. The advice they give me is to find what you love to do and do it for yourself 100%.
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    • Profile picture of the author rbates
      As profound a statement as that sounds (and I guess it is),
      isn't it usually the case that the only person that holds me
      back is "ME"?

      Learning the positive elements of living (work ethic, attitude, etc.)
      early on in life is extremely important. If one's parents helped in
      that regard, then so much the better.

      Much of success is based upon change. It takes hard work (and often sacrifice)
      to make the necessary changes to achieve many goals.

      Nice story and good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeff Schuman
    Great story. I have always found that people of all income levels love to talk about themselves if you are sincerely interested and probe them a little. You just proved that as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    This story is bittersweet for a few reasons - it's basically the American Dream, starting at the bottom and working your way up. There are certainly a lot more people of retirement age that can share a story like his than there are who can say "I'm a millionaire thanks to Amazon affiliate links"

    But the reality of it today is that's a lot harder to do within the same company because fewer companies are promoting from within. In his day, an employer was limited to "the currently available". But with today's communication tools (resume sites, LinkedIn, etc.) I have my pick of people from all over the country and, for the right salary, they'll move to my city.

    There are still a handful of companies out there that promote from within, but the vast majority have learned to keep the best people exactly where they are. Being the best at something no longer guarantees advancement - more times than not, it guarantees you'll stay exactly where you are.

    For example... would I promote my best programmer into a management position, and leave the programmers behind that aren't as good as him doing the programming? Not likely.

    The key - and probably what this guy did - is to show leadership whenever possible. Take on new challenges, inside and outside of the workplace. Organize events, even if they're simply charities that have nothing to do with your job. Then talk about these examples of leadership on your resume. If I want to hire a leader, I'm going to hire a leader, not "the guy who was the best at his non-leadership job".

    That's how the guy you're talking about made it to the top. And if you take an entrepreneurial mindset when it comes to your day to day job, you'll get there too. Don't worry about impressing your boss - worry about impressing your next boss by having a resume that shows strong examples of leadership. That's the real path to middle and upper management.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeff Schuman
      Originally Posted by ronrule View Post

      This story is bittersweet for a few reasons - it's basically the American Dream, starting at the bottom and working your way up. There are certainly a lot more people of retirement age that can share a story like his than there are who can say "I'm a millionaire thanks to Amazon affiliate links"

      But the reality of it today is that's a lot harder to do within the same company because fewer companies are promoting from within. In his day, an employer was limited to "the currently available". But with today's communication tools (resume sites, LinkedIn, etc.) I have my pick of people from all over the country and, for the right salary, they'll move to my city.

      There are still a handful of companies out there that promote from within, but the vast majority have learned to keep the best people exactly where they are. Being the best at something no longer guarantees advancement - more times than not, it guarantees you'll stay exactly where you are.

      For example... would I promote my best programmer into a management position, and leave the programmers behind that aren't as good as him doing the programming? Not likely.

      The key - and probably what this guy did - is to show leadership whenever possible. Take on new challenges, inside and outside of the workplace. Organize events, even if they're simply charities that have nothing to do with your job. Then talk about these examples of leadership on your resume. If I want to hire a leader, I'm going to hire a leader, not "the guy who was the best at his non-leadership job".

      That's how the guy you're talking about made it to the top. And if you take an entrepreneurial mindset when it comes to your day to day job, you'll get there too. Don't worry about impressing your boss - worry about impressing your next boss by having a resume that shows strong examples of leadership. That's the real path to middle and upper management.
      I agree Ron. 30 years ago we used to do Amway meetings, and refer to the 40 year plan where you worked for a company for 40 years, and hopefully saved enough money along with social security to retire and live the remaining years of your life comfortably.

      Not true anymore. When General Motors almost went under in 2008 that should have been the wake up call to everyone that there is no 40 year old retirement plan anymore for most of us.

      I ran across an old friend who has been with U.S. West for 38 years. Of course they have been bought out and name changes over the years, but she is the only person other than teachers I know of that will be able to say they stayed with the same company for 40 years.
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  • Profile picture of the author Natniszakov
    It seems so obvious but it's not.
    Sometimes, we need just a little push from someone that has been in our position before.
    I'm glad for you !
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    Nat Niszakov

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  • So, Judge Groovyman, because of your intention to wait in line at that retirement celebration for the VP you so much respect, you gave yourself the gift of not only his great advice that echoed your own studies, but got a great commemorative coin to remember the whole event by. Nice work, Groovyman! . . . onward!
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    • Profile picture of the author Judge Groovyman
      [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author Judge Groovyman
      Originally Posted by v4victoria View Post

      You know some people are intimidated to talk to rich people. They have this preconceived idea that they are going to be nasty because that's how they got rich. Rich people who have created their own wealth love it when people pick their brains like you did. It reminds them of their success and they are more than happy to talk.
      yeah! for example: My parents seem to think poorly of all rich people. And you are right he did seem to enjoy my question.

      Originally Posted by rbates View Post

      As profound a statement as that sounds (and I guess it is),
      isn't it usually the case that the only person that holds me
      back is "ME"?
      ...
      Nice story and good luck.
      Yes it seems that way to me. I can FEEL myself holding myself back and am actively learning to "let go".

      Thank you!



      Originally Posted by Jeff Schuman View Post

      Great story. I have always found that people of all income levels love to talk about themselves if you are sincerely interested and probe them a little. You just proved that as well.
      Thanks! Yeah, thats the impression I got from this guy and I believe v4victoria has some similar feelings about it.


      Originally Posted by ronrule View Post

      This story is bittersweet for a few reasons - it's basically the American Dream, starting at the bottom and working your way up. There are certainly a lot more people of retirement age that can share a story like his than there are who can say "I'm a millionaire thanks to Amazon affiliate links"

      But the reality of it today is that's a lot harder to do within the same company because fewer companies are promoting from within. In his day, an employer was limited to "the currently available". But with today's communication tools (resume sites, LinkedIn, etc.) I have my pick of people from all over the country and, for the right salary, they'll move to my city.
      ...

      That's how the guy you're talking about made it to the top. And if you take an entrepreneurial mindset when it comes to your day to day job, you'll get there too. Don't worry about impressing your boss - worry about impressing your next boss by having a resume that shows strong examples of leadership. That's the real path to middle and upper management.
      Good Point. Seth Godin seems to think climbing the corporate ladder is kind of a dead end, and he suggests starting extraordinary projects instead. And thanks for the good advice about aiming high at the job, I had never thought about it quite like that. I had considered meeting the responsibilities of the job above even before I got it, but you are right that aiming to impress the NEXT boss seems particularly valuable.

      Originally Posted by Natniszakov View Post

      It seems so obvious but it's not.
      Sometimes, we need just a little push from someone that has been in our position before.
      I'm glad for you !
      Yes its so easy to just say "Yeah, thats true, and I already know that, so I don't need to take any action on that". Thank you.


      Originally Posted by LastingLifeSuccess View Post

      So, Judge Groovyman, because of your intention to wait in line at that retirement celebration for the VP you so much respect, you gave yourself the gift of not only his great advice that echoed your own studies, but got a great commemorative coin to remember the whole event by. Nice work, Groovyman! . . . onward!
      Thank you so much! True, I didn't have to wait in line. Nobody else from my group even went!?! their loss
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