You Get Your Break...Then Ruin It - What Would You Do?

6 replies
So I've been trying to break into a certain field within the internet business realm. I finally got my break yesterday when a semi-bigwig asked for my e-mail and phone number. I sent him an e-mail with what I thought would be funny headline (so he'd open it and not think it was spam) and he basically ripped me to shreds saying I was young and stupid and he knew what I was trying to do. I didn't mean anything by it, just a mistake I guess.

So I sent an apology, telling him that I didn't mean to offend him and he basically sent me back a message telling me the same thing as the previous e-mail.

Should I keep defending myself or call it a day and move on? I would like to make good with him and still move on. Is asking for the best of both worlds too much?
#big break #break #breakthen #ruin
  • Profile picture of the author Devon Brown
    Move on. Life is too short to "make good". You apologized, you learned from it.. now go find another semi-bigwig or better yet, find a BIGWIG.

    Good luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author jayden.fellze
    first of all, i don't need to say you have to regret what you have just done. The damage has already been done and i think you should move on. People has its own attitude and characteristic. I hope next time you'll be more professional and treat other people well since you are doing a business. Establishing a good relationship is a very important act to be done.
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  • Profile picture of the author Norma Holt
    It takes a lot of tact to hit the tight spot with busy business people. You are obviously young, as noted by your avatar. Without meaning you any offense you have to get some maturity and speak to them on their terms at their level. If you can't do that then stay away.

    God bless

    Norma
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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
    You've learned something valuable that will help you succeed next time. Mistakes are just a natural part of learning something new and succeeding. Remember there will be many more breaks. Think of all the rejection people who have accomplished something important and made their dreams a reality had to deal with.

    John Grisham's first novel was rejected by sixteen agents and twelve publishing houses. And Stephen King threw his manuscript for Carrie in the garbage because he was tired of rejections. "We are not interested in science fiction that deals with negative utopias," he was told. "They do not sell." Yet as we know these people became very successful despite the fact that they were rejected early on.

    So keep striving on more intelligently than before.
    Signature
    "Each problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful that it literally dwarfs the problem. The greatest success stories were created by people who recognized a problem and turned it into an opportunity."―Joseph Sugarman
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  • It probably won't be the last time something you do is rejected -- but every single rejection teaches you something about yourself, or the industry you want to work in, or about people in general.

    Figure out what the lesson is, make amends respectfully -- which you have, as you say -- and then move on to the next thing.

    And maybe stick with standard subject lines in situations like these from now on.
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  • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
    Forget about it dude... Don't even sweat it. You misread the person or the situation...

    It happens. I've done it myself.

    Some self-righteous prick that's too full of himself to accept your sincere apology is a problem client in waiting... one I would happily FIRE. Can you imagine what an insufferable jackass like that would be like to work with?

    As a copywriter, you're going to run into plenty of marketers who do not value you as they should... Their loss.

    Last time it happened to me I apologized for the misunderstanding as I'd clearly offended him, then told the referral "Clearly I'm an idiot and you're an asshole... bad start. I'll pass on the project but thanks for asking..."

    The guy literally could not believe I'd walk from $6k...

    With a skip in my step, buddy. Life is short. Pick your travelmates carefully.

    Best,

    Brian
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