New Year Resolutions are STUPID..

26 replies
Okay, so the title of this thread is not 100% correct..

I don't think the concept of New Year Resolutions is stupid, I just think the way most people go about it is.

Come on, think about it. "I'm going to become a totally different on the first day of 2014! I'm going to exercise, stop smoking, stop drinking, eat healthier, watch less TV and a bunch of other stuff".

That's ridiculous, if you have not been able to do any of that stuff in 2013, what makes you think you're going to do it all as of January the 1st 2014?

It's a crazy way of going about improving yourself, I suppose that's why it's estimated that 88% of people who set New Year Resolutions fail.. IF you take the US alone, that's like 276 261 879 failed resolutions every year..

(Based of estimated US population in 2010 - See More..)

Good luck on keeping yours going! I'm sure you can!

But do you want to know how to be 50% more likely to succeed?

Great! The first thing you need to do, is turn your New Year Resolutions into habits. Small ones of course

For example:
- Resolution: Stop Smoking.
- Habit: Cut out that morning cigarette you have with a cup of coffee.

If you turn your resolutions into small and scalable habits like this, you are much more likely to succeed and the chance of you being a totally new person by the end of 2014 is much greater.

Q. Why do this?

The answer to that is simple.

Willpower.

It's that part of your brain that's located in prefrontal cortex, it's the part that allows you to do what you SHOULD do over what you shouldn't.

You know, "Eat the cake or go for a walk?"...

It's a beautiful thing... BUT there's one issue with it.

It's limited.

Yep that's right, we as humans only have so much willpower. That's why imposing a bunch of huge New Year Resolutions is a bad idea.

Our brains can't handle it.. That's why most people never end up keeping them.

By turning your New Year Resolutions into habits, what you are doing is making small change which you can put all your focus into. You are creating new habits which will eventually overwrite your old ones.

Sure, you might think that cutting out than one cigarette you have first thing in the morning won't make you a better person. Actually, you'd be surprised, it does two incredible things.

1. It strengthens your willpower muscle, which makes you more likely to do things you want to do further on into the year.
2. It means you are more or less (as long as you are serious about change) guaranteed to do better at change than you did last year in terms of the long run.

The saying "Slow and steady wins the race" comes into play here, you start small and as you get comfortable with it, you increase it which in my example, might be cutting out another one or two cigarettes a day.

Do this and I promise you that you will do amazing in 2014!

Joe Crosbie,
#habits #resolutions #set #stupid #year
  • Profile picture of the author justhumza
    What you've written is totally correct... The first time my New Year's Resolutions actually started happening was when I stopped started to work from that moment to form a habit that would lead me to my goal.

    It's all about creating a lifestyle around your goal instead of trying to make it happen all at once.
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  • Profile picture of the author datingworld
    Hi Joe,

    I don't agree with everything you have written but still you have raised some very good points.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Crosbie
      Originally Posted by justhumza View Post

      What you've written is totally correct... The first time my New Year's Resolutions actually started happening was when I stopped started to work from that moment to form a habit that would lead me to my goal.

      It's all about creating a lifestyle around your goal instead of trying to make it happen all at once.
      Same here, it's a small change that has drastic results!

      Originally Posted by datingworld View Post

      Hi Joe,

      I don't agree with everything you have written but still you have raised some very good points.
      Hey @datingworld!

      The thread is just my opinion of course, it's what works for me

      Feel free to share what you don't agree with and what you feel are some good ways to ensure people succeed in 2014!

      Joe,
      Signature
      I chose entrepreneurship over further education despite being laughed at by my friends and family..

      I recently hit the "RESTART" button on my life, read my personal blog to find out how I did it :)
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      • Profile picture of the author alvaromunir
        IF IT HELPS JUST ONE PERSON THEN IT'S OK. I have many friends who have got slimmer by sticking to a healthy diet
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  • Profile picture of the author RuthStewart
    I guess it's easy to think, yeah, I can do this and this and this, but it turns out to be a lot tougher than just thinking about it.

    It's better to figure out a change that you are pretty sure you can stick to, than plan to change your whole life. I like this bite-size idea, I think it could work.

    Off to think of bite-size things I can change.........starting with making weekly plans every week I think.......

    Best wishes,

    Ruth
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  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    The secret to discipline is remembering what you want.

    I agree with everything you're saying. In 2008 I wasn't really where I wanted to be in life. I was about to turn 30 and no matter how "good" things were starting to go financially, I still just felt like something was missing and there were things I wanted to change about myself.

    I started with my weight. I used to be a pretty big guy, about 260 lbs and smoked a pack a day. I'm only 5'10 so at that weight I was wearing pants with a 42" waist... I always felt awkward, even when in really nice clothes, it just felt like nothing fit right unless it was custom tailored. I hated the thought of exercise, so I knew that even if I "pushed through it" I wouldn't ever stick with a gym membership and would just gain the weight back, the drastic new years resolution style changes wouldn't work. I needed to figure out a way to do it on my own terms. But I also have 3 kids, so simply "not buying snacks and stuff" wasn't an option.

    This is going to sound kind of weird and you'll probably laugh... I took a picture of myself shirtless in the "Demi Moore Pose" - the 1991 vanity fair cover where she posed pregnant (Google it if you have no idea what I'm talking about). I taped that picture of myself to the fridge and in the cabinet where the chips and snack foods are kept.

    Every time I felt like snacking, I would have to look at that picture. I hated it... and every time I looked at it, it reminded me that my desire to change the way I looked was stronger than my appetite.

    The first ten pounds came off pretty quick.

    The next 20 took longer, but I was feeling better. I had more energy, wasn't as tired. My clothes were loose. I started to shift from simply "eating less" to eating less and making healthier decisions when I did eat.

    After losing that first 30, just from that simple habit change, I added a daily walk to my routine. One mile... nothing major, but I was the start of a routine. No excuses. Rain or shine, I would change before I left the office and hit a trail on the way home. I found those walks gave me some alone time to think and plan out my next day, and as the time went on I realized that little bit of clarity was helping me think through business decisions and make better ones.

    Those one mile walks eventually became two, then four. I wasn't smoking on my walks, and I was drinking a lot of water so the nicotine cravings were diminished. e-cigarettes came out and I switched to one of those and found that not smoking also gave me more energy. The walks slowly turned into a walking/jogging mix. Then just jogging. Still rain or shine, still had the pic on the fridge.

    One year and 90 lbs later, I was waking up every morning at 5 am and doing a 2 mile run. If you had told me a year earlier that I would be a fit non-smoker who woke up at 5:00 in the morning and ran two miles every day, I'd have laughed at you.

    Four years later I'm still following the same routine. The pic isn't on the fridge anymore, I no longer need it. I'll be 35 in two weeks, in better shape than I was in high school, all by starting small and sticking with it. I've still never been to a gym.

    New Years Resolutions are stupid. Be the person you want to be by doing the things the person you want to be does. Small goals first ... The funny thing about goals is that you're never actually satisfied. It's temporary, there will always still be something you want. My goal was never to "lose 90 lbs" - if it had been, I probably wouldn't have reached it, it would have been a pipe dream. My goal was to "not look like that". That's it. Each achievement is a milestone that leads to the next one.
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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    without New Years Resolutions, 99.9% of the people would have none at all
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    In a moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing. The worst thing you can do is nothing. ~ Theodore Roosevelt

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  • Profile picture of the author InfoBuzz13
    I agree what Joe has written, human brain works better with small changes. Small changes are easy to control. We all know it is difficult to break our habits, but if we take one step at a time things seem easy.
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    Hi, My name is Rita and I am Entrepreneur. My niche is health & fitness. Check my blog out.Health is Wealth - http://www.infotemplegoodhealth.blogspot.com

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    • Profile picture of the author shahriyar
      In my experience will power is the key and strength to keep up that level of will power. I have seen a lot of people (among friends), when they are encouraged to build up will power to get rid of a bad habit, they did get pumped and they did refrain from those habits for a few days.... make a week but couldn't hold on to that level of will power and that's where they failed.

      So, its also important to have someone remind you that you are doing a good job or talk to you to pump up your will power once in a while. I have had someone leave drugs using this method.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mr Bill
    I use a method I call "Anniverserising" which uses the opportunity of easy-to-remember milestones to make changes. For example "since my birthday, since Christmas day, this year, since I had my big car accident, since the start of school holidays"...etc. I just makes it easy to remember how long it's been.

    If I start something on a non-descript day that means nothing, I find it's more difficult to quickly think back how long it's been. This is why I think people use January 1 to try again for their "goals".
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Crosbie
      Originally Posted by alvaromunir View Post

      IF IT HELPS JUST ONE PERSON THEN IT'S OK. I have many friends who have got slimmer by sticking to a healthy diet
      Yes I agree but by making a simple change to how we go about New Year Resolutions, I personally believe that we can turn the table around so instead of it helping just one person it could help a lot of people!

      Originally Posted by RuthStewart View Post

      I guess it's easy to think, yeah, I can do this and this and this, but it turns out to be a lot tougher than just thinking about it.

      It's better to figure out a change that you are pretty sure you can stick to, than plan to change your whole life. I like this bite-size idea, I think it could work.

      Off to think of bite-size things I can change.........starting with making weekly plans every week I think.......

      Ruth
      Exactly, that's why so many people fail. I think the whole concept of "I'll wait until the New Year to start walking daily" also sets up for failure, we're practising the art of procrastination which means when it comes to actually doing it, it's very easy to say "tomorrow".

      Originally Posted by ronrule View Post

      The secret to discipline is remembering what you want.

      I agree with everything you're saying. In 2008 I wasn't really where I wanted to be in life. I was about to turn 30 and no matter how "good" things were starting to go financially, I still just felt like something was missing and there were things I wanted to change about myself.

      I started with my weight. I used to be a pretty big guy, about 260 lbs and smoked a pack a day. I'm only 5'10 so at that weight I was wearing pants with a 42" waist... I always felt awkward, even when in really nice clothes, it just felt like nothing fit right unless it was custom tailored. I hated the thought of exercise, so I knew that even if I "pushed through it" I wouldn't ever stick with a gym membership and would just gain the weight back, the drastic new years resolution style changes wouldn't work. I needed to figure out a way to do it on my own terms. But I also have 3 kids, so simply "not buying snacks and stuff" wasn't an option.

      This is going to sound kind of weird and you'll probably laugh... I took a picture of myself shirtless in the "Demi Moore Pose" - the 1991 vanity fair cover where she posed pregnant (Google it if you have no idea what I'm talking about). I taped that picture of myself to the fridge and in the cabinet where the chips and snack foods are kept.

      Every time I felt like snacking, I would have to look at that picture. I hated it... and every time I looked at it, it reminded me that my desire to change the way I looked was stronger than my appetite.

      The first ten pounds came off pretty quick.

      The next 20 took longer, but I was feeling better. I had more energy, wasn't as tired. My clothes were loose. I started to shift from simply "eating less" to eating less and making healthier decisions when I did eat.

      After losing that first 30, just from that simple habit change, I added a daily walk to my routine. One mile... nothing major, but I was the start of a routine. No excuses. Rain or shine, I would change before I left the office and hit a trail on the way home. I found those walks gave me some alone time to think and plan out my next day, and as the time went on I realized that little bit of clarity was helping me think through business decisions and make better ones.

      Those one mile walks eventually became two, then four. I wasn't smoking on my walks, and I was drinking a lot of water so the nicotine cravings were diminished. e-cigarettes came out and I switched to one of those and found that not smoking also gave me more energy. The walks slowly turned into a walking/jogging mix. Then just jogging. Still rain or shine, still had the pic on the fridge.

      One year and 90 lbs later, I was waking up every morning at 5 am and doing a 2 mile run. If you had told me a year earlier that I would be a fit non-smoker who woke up at 5:00 in the morning and ran two miles every day, I'd have laughed at you.

      Four years later I'm still following the same routine. The pic isn't on the fridge anymore, I no longer need it. I'll be 35 in two weeks, in better shape than I was in high school, all by starting small and sticking with it. I've still never been to a gym.

      New Years Resolutions are stupid. Be the person you want to be by doing the things the person you want to be does. Small goals first ... The funny thing about goals is that you're never actually satisfied. It's temporary, there will always still be something you want. My goal was never to "lose 90 lbs" - if it had been, I probably wouldn't have reached it, it would have been a pipe dream. My goal was to "not look like that". That's it. Each achievement is a milestone that leads to the next one.
      Very true Ron! It's a lot easier doing something when you can see clearly what it is you are working towards.

      Your story is very inspiring and I'm sure a lot of people can relate to some of the points you made! Weirdly enough, I didn't laugh at the idea of taking a picture of yourself shirtless, I actually went "Woah! That's clever!". It must be a great motivator seeing yourself in a way that you don't want to.

      You rock for changing your appearance like that, it must have been very difficult albeit it made a lot easier by using the concept of implementing little changes, like walking daily in your case. Thanks for sharing (Y)

      I agree totally with us never being fully satisfied with our results, but I think that's the great thing about them and about humans in general. There's always room to better, there's always room for improvement!

      Best of luck with your milestones for 2014!

      Originally Posted by NewParadigm View Post

      without New Years Resolutions, 99.9% of the people would have none at all
      I agree and without New Year Resolutions, there would be 276 261 879 less failed resolutions every year too!

      Originally Posted by InfoBuzz13 View Post

      I agree what Joe has written, human brain works better with small changes. Small changes are easy to control. We all know it is difficult to break our habits, but if we take one step at a time things seem easy.
      Thank you! I'm glad you agree.

      The most difficult thing about habits is that they are more or less impossible to break. That's just how it is, instead we need to form new habits which overwrite our old ones. Hence why change is often so difficult.

      Originally Posted by shahriyar View Post

      In my experience will power is the key and strength to keep up that level of will power. I have seen a lot of people (among friends), when they are encouraged to build up will power to get rid of a bad habit, they did get pumped and they did refrain from those habits for a few days.... make a week but couldn't hold on to that level of will power and that's where they failed.

      So, its also important to have someone remind you that you are doing a good job or talk to you to pump up your will power once in a while. I have had someone leave drugs using this method.
      I agree very much @Shahriyar! Positive reassurance from people is a great way to stay motivated about change.

      Originally Posted by Arun Chandran View Post

      Joe, you seriously write some of the best posts in this section of the forum.

      I read all your posts and always learn something new or remember something I shouldn't have forgotten.

      Have a wonderful 2014!
      Woah! Thank you very much @Arun Chandran, that's insane! You rock and have certainly made my day!

      I'm glad I can share what I learn with people and have someone enjoy it!

      Good luck in 2014!

      Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post

      I use a method I call "Anniverserising" which uses the opportunity of easy-to-remember milestones to make changes. For example "since my birthday, since Christmas day, this year, since I had my big car accident, since the start of school holidays"...etc. I just makes it easy to remember how long it's been.

      If I start something on a non-descript day that means nothing, I find it's more difficult to quickly think back how long it's been. This is why I think people use January 1 to try again for their "goals".
      That's a very interesting concept @Mr Bill, I really like that!

      As you said, being an easy to remember day makes it super simple to say "I've been running since my birthday, woah it's been 8 months already..."

      A very good way to make us good about our achievement I'd imagine!
      Signature
      I chose entrepreneurship over further education despite being laughed at by my friends and family..

      I recently hit the "RESTART" button on my life, read my personal blog to find out how I did it :)
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  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
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  • "SLOW BUT STEADY WINS THE RACE".... I personally believe in this proverb. But, sometimes we need to give up the bad habit of procrastination. Of course, a new year is a new number and it creates a sense of new start in our brain, in our mind. But, with time the feel and excitement fades away and the habit of procrastination dominates. So, only starting afresh is not going to make any difference, you need to be consistent and steady again.
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  • Profile picture of the author Taviuss
    I do agree wholeheartedly with making small changes rather than sweeping ones though.

    For example, it's why "Fast" weight loss schemes are so popular and such miserable failures - if people struggling with their weight simply made minor changes to their diet over time and focused on the long-term benefits, they'd ultimately reach and stay at their desired weight. Ditto for increasing their level of activity and exercise.

    Sure, it may take five years, but those who stick to it don't bounce back like those who go for a quick fix.

    A goal, any goal, has to be realistically achievable and generally doesn't need to be accomplished within a narrowly defined, artificial time-frame.[/QUOTE]

    While I agree with a lot of what is here, I want to take issue on this particular item.

    I personally agree that it has to be realistically achievable, but I personally have found that a specific target is a necessity, if you want to get there.

    My own statement on this would be - set yourself a goal.
    Be very specific, and feel that you can hit it. I would recommend going to something that is abit out of your normal comfort zone, to really get going there.
    A step further, I would write down the goal, post it, and read it daily.
    I do think the above post about the pictures up around the house can definitely help - it can keep you motivated.
    The trick with keeping any new years resolution is more than saying I will do it, but having this goal and reminders to get yourself there!
    Signature
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  • Profile picture of the author Zincabopa
    Totally agree with you. I actually wrote a blog post on this same topic, if anyone is interested:

    thathungrymind.blogspot.ca

    Something that I see a lot at the gym every year are a sudden influx of newcomers to the gym every January, and then a gradual decrease until the people who were regulars the previous year were the only ones left. But there have been instances where I've noticed, for example, this middle aged man who was overweight. He took dancing classes every week, and every week, I would notice him in the dance studio. A year later, he still comes every week, and he has lots so much weight that I would never have known he was the same person that I first saw. Consistency is the key.
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  • Profile picture of the author Karleen
    Thanks, Joe, for this reminder that good things don't happen overnight. Breaking down your resolutions into bits and pieces that you can eliminate over a period of time is much easier than going for the big picture of "I'm going to quit smoking, starting today" or "I'm going to cut out sugar completely from my diet starting today". Cutting out that morning cigarette or that morning muffin and replacing it with something healthy is a lot easier than trying to do it all at once. It may take longer, but you're more apt to stick with it. And when you see results, you'll be more excited to move on to the next phase of cutting out one more thing.

    I totally agree with you. New Year's resolutions are stupid UNLESS you're willing to be patient, use some will power and have some common sense as to how much you know you can give up for a good length of time in order to see good results.
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  • Profile picture of the author juees12
    I agree to an extent that new years resolutions can be bullshit. I've been wanting to make progress for a whole year, but I got a breakthrough just earlier this month.

    Basically the whole idea of new years resolution is just another form of procrastination: "I'll do it tomorrow".

    What really got my own engine going was the resolution to thrive towards what I really want STARTING NOW. Not a moment later, because that's just more bullshit.

    It's not enough to make a "promise to yourself", but actually remind yourself constantly of why you are willing to do whatever it takes to succeed. You have to have a clear image of your dream to burst through the brick wall.

    Results so far: I've fixed my sleep schedule, which has been irregular and horrible for over a decade. I've been super productive for a while now and am not lacking energy: I've started exercising, learned to cook, learning two languages and I'm writing 2-3 well researched articles a day + building my social media presence.

    The change is pretty immense, considering that I was before just watching movies and browsing reddit.

    No new years resolution needed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Crosbie
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      While I agree with your comments in general, I don't think it's really about willpower, so much as setting unrealistic goals. Not just on January 1st, but pretty much with everything folks try to do throughout the year.

      I do agree wholeheartedly with making small changes rather than sweeping ones though.

      For example, it's why "Fast" weight loss schemes are so popular and such miserable failures - if people struggling with their weight simply made minor changes to their diet over time and focused on the long-term benefits, they'd ultimately reach and stay at their desired weight. Ditto for increasing their level of activity and exercise.

      Sure, it may take five years, but those who stick to it don't bounce back like those who go for a quick fix.

      A goal, any goal, has to be realistically achievable and generally doesn't need to be accomplished within a narrowly defined, artificial time-frame.
      I definitely see where you're coming from, you do have a great point. I agree that setting goals are unrealistic is a very strong contributor as to why most people fail.

      I have a feeling I'm going to say this term a lot in these replies "Consistency is the key" - You're example sums it up perfectly!

      Originally Posted by LastingLifeSuccess View Post

      I am in the "slow but steady wins the race" camp. I have always liked the idea and implementation of incremental change over a decent amount of time. This is a winning strategy.

      LLS
      I agree that it's a winning strategy! It's the momentum that keeps you going when times gets tough. It's an amazing feeling to look back at all the little things that you've achieved!

      Originally Posted by virtualconsultant View Post

      "SLOW BUT STEADY WINS THE RACE".... I personally believe in this proverb. But, sometimes we need to give up the bad habit of procrastination. Of course, a new year is a new number and it creates a sense of new start in our brain, in our mind. But, with time the feel and excitement fades away and the habit of procrastination dominates. So, only starting afresh is not going to make any difference, you need to be consistent and steady again.
      Consistency is the key to succeeding in anything, without it, we would get nowhere at all.

      Whereas I agree that the New Year is not going to guarantee success, I feel it's a great time to start. As long as we can get the initial momentum going, it makes the likelihood of success much greater.

      Originally Posted by Taviuss View Post


      While I agree with a lot of what is here, I want to take issue on this particular item.

      I personally agree that it has to be realistically achievable, but I personally have found that a specific target is a necessity, if you want to get there.

      My own statement on this would be - set yourself a goal.
      Be very specific, and feel that you can hit it. I would recommend going to something that is abit out of your normal comfort zone, to really get going there.
      A step further, I would write down the goal, post it, and read it daily.
      I do think the above post about the pictures up around the house can definitely help - it can keep you motivated.
      The trick with keeping any new years resolution is more than saying I will do it, but having this goal and reminders to get yourself there!
      Yes, very much so. This is why I love the New Year, it allows you to be very specific.

      For example, I know that there are 365 days ahead of me, I know my goals and all I need to do now is plan them out of the course of the year.

      I set quarterly milestones, monthly goals and weekly tasks. Not knowing where I'm going is not an option, my destination is too clear.

      I agree with you about self affirming the goal on the daily basis, that stuff works! I used to somewhat look down on it but after digging deeper into the science behind it, it's a very powerful technique. As you said, very useful for keeping the motivation going!

      For me, reminders are my milestones

      Originally Posted by Zincabopa View Post

      Totally agree with you. I actually wrote a blog post on this same topic, if anyone is interested:

      thathungrymind.blogspot.ca

      Something that I see a lot at the gym every year are a sudden influx of newcomers to the gym every January, and then a gradual decrease until the people who were regulars the previous year were the only ones left. But there have been instances where I've noticed, for example, this middle aged man who was overweight. He took dancing classes every week, and every week, I would notice him in the dance studio. A year later, he still comes every week, and he has lots so much weight that I would never have known he was the same person that I first saw. Consistency is the key.
      Consistency is the key, you said dude! That story is very inspirational!

      I'm always planning on reading your blog post a little later on when I drink my coffee

      Originally Posted by Karleen View Post

      Thanks, Joe, for this reminder that good things don't happen overnight. Breaking down your resolutions into bits and pieces that you can eliminate over a period of time is much easier than going for the big picture of "I'm going to quit smoking, starting today" or "I'm going to cut out sugar completely from my diet starting today". Cutting out that morning cigarette or that morning muffin and replacing it with something healthy is a lot easier than trying to do it all at once. It may take longer, but you're more apt to stick with it. And when you see results, you'll be more excited to move on to the next phase of cutting out one more thing.

      I totally agree with you. New Year's resolutions are stupid UNLESS you're willing to be patient, use some will power and have some common sense as to how much you know you can give up for a good length of time in order to see good results.
      You are very welcome @Karleen! You summed up my thread a lot better than I did!

      The way you worded the second paragraph, I know that 2014 is going to rock for you!

      Originally Posted by juees12 View Post

      I agree to an extent that new years resolutions can be bullshit. I've been wanting to make progress for a whole year, but I got a breakthrough just earlier this month.

      Basically the whole idea of new years resolution is just another form of procrastination: "I'll do it tomorrow".

      What really got my own engine going was the resolution to thrive towards what I really want STARTING NOW. Not a moment later, because that's just more bullshit.

      It's not enough to make a "promise to yourself", but actually remind yourself constantly of why you are willing to do whatever it takes to succeed. You have to have a clear image of your dream to burst through the brick wall.

      Results so far: I've fixed my sleep schedule, which has been irregular and horrible for over a decade. I've been super productive for a while now and am not lacking energy: I've started exercising, learned to cook, learning two languages and I'm writing 2-3 well researched articles a day + building my social media presence.

      The change is pretty immense, considering that I was before just watching movies and browsing reddit.

      No new years resolution needed.
      I agree with you 100%. Starting now is better than starting tomorrow. I think the New Year is a great time for people who think like that, there's something about a New Year that just gives people an overload of motivation.

      If a little advice can put them on the right track, that's awesome! It's just a shame so many people fail!

      It sounds like you're doing insanely well! Well done for that! It definitely sounds like you're going way ahead of most in a years time if you keep the momentum going!
      Signature
      I chose entrepreneurship over further education despite being laughed at by my friends and family..

      I recently hit the "RESTART" button on my life, read my personal blog to find out how I did it :)
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Hi Joe,

    Good points! NOW exists. Time is an illusion. I like New Moment Resolutions. Keeps me hungry, driven and focused without looking at a calendar. I would NEVER, going forward, allow numbers on a piece of paper, or calendar, to rule my life.

    I choose to take seemingly tiny steps in each moment to create my life to order. I remember why I am taking the steps to keep myself focused.

    Great share, thanks!
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    Ryan Biddulph inspires you to be a successful blogger with his courses, 100 plus eBooks, audio books and blog at Blogging From Paradise
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  • Profile picture of the author Ricardo Furtado
    I think you got it right on the first line.

    Resolutions are stupid…if you can’t keep ‘em when you make ‘em all year long –
    What makes you think that you can keep ‘em, -

    Just coz the page of that calendar has been flipped?

    All the best. Regards.
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    Ricardo Furtado

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  • Profile picture of the author PTR
    Joe, Good post. Some people believe that it takes 21 unbroken occurences to create a habit (eg go for a run 21 days in a row, write 3 articles 21 days in a row etc). If you do that, by the time the 21 days is up the new action is a habit so you just carry on. Another reason NY resolutions don't work is people usually associate them with negative actions (eg stop eating chocolate/stop smoking) and for long periods (stop eating chocolate...forever) so quickly become disenchanted. This is a 'running away from' situation which the mind hates. What you need to do is turn the required end state into a 'running towards' desire. That makes the whole outcome more pleasurable. So really they should be looking at what result they want (healthy body) and then determining what new habit they can create to achieve the outcome (cut down/cut out chocolate/smoking). A subtle but powerful change of emphasis.
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  • Profile picture of the author Justin Says
    I'm all about changing the way I use my words..

    I don't want a new years resolution.. I want a life resolution. If that comes in the middle of the year, 5 minutes after a meeting, 2 days after my birthday.. so be it.

    But to say, "hey I'm going to stop everything I was doing and change because everyone else is.. and it's a new year"... nah not interested.

    If I am in the mood to change something, I change it.
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    My name is Justin Lewis, with Business Optimizer I've been in business for 6 years online with multiple six figure years, here are the tools that have helped me the most: Increase your reviews with this free Review Handout

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  • Profile picture of the author Sieg
    Brian Tracy says to write them down. That worked for me.
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  • Profile picture of the author joesfortune
    I must admit your title is very catchy. Good job.
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    Joseph M. Dabon
    Blogger and freelance writer. I belong to Ezine's Expert Author, Diamond, level. Visit me at
    http://withinyouisyoursuccess.com/

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