What strange misconception did you have as a child?

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What strange misconception did you have as a child?
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  • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
    That uppity garden gnomes shouldn't be punched on sight.

    That vacuum cleaner salesmen make a valuable contribution to society.

    That Nelson Mandela would die in jail (despite the fact he hadn't been put in jail yet).

    I know better now.
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    Why do garden gnomes smell so bad?
    So that blind people can hate them as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Misconceptions, ok...

    I couldn't figure out why Atari 2600 games costed $50 each, and had seriously terrible resolution?

    Why l couldn't go and see Alien, because it has a silly R rating, for 18 years and over?

    Why Gray and Grey, mean the same thing, and ONLY shows that our planet is big, and some terms can be spelt differently?

    Why people religiously cling to ideas that are clearly false and becoming more false by the day?

    Why kittens have the string issues?

    Why certain 4 letter institutions are lying scum, and others lap up their pre-school answers to said lies?

    Why most countries put the dollar above, health and wellbeing?

    And why we continue to p*** away 10's of millions of dollars into dodgy ways to generate power, when magnetic systems should get the lions share.

    And the air speed velocity of an unladen swallow?

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    • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
      Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

      And why we continue to p*** away 10's of millions of dollars into dodgy ways to generate power, when magnetic systems should get the lions share.
      So, as a child you had the misconception that millions of dollars were being wasted on technologies which didn't exist back then instead of a technology that still doesn't exist.


      To any lifeforms from elsewhere in the universe who were wondering what that loud bang was coming from the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy.

      It was the sound of seven billion humans facepalming and headdesking all at the same time.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

        So, as a child you had the misconception that millions of dollars were being wasted on technologies which didn't exist back then instead of a technology that still doesn't exist.


        To any lifeforms from elsewhere in the universe who were wondering what that loud bang was coming from the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy.

        It was the sound of seven billion humans facepalming and headdesking all at the same time.

        I was going to let it go..

        But you handled it beautifully.

        If only I could read this kind of wit from Riffle.
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      • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
        Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

        So, as a child you had the misconception that millions of dollars were being wasted on technologies which didn't exist back then instead of a technology that still doesn't exist.


        To any lifeforms from elsewhere in the universe who were wondering what that loud bang was coming from the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy.

        It was the sound of seven billion humans facepalming and headdesking all at the same time.
        "To any lifeforms from elsewhere in the universe who were wondering what that loud bang was coming from the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy."

        GOT YAAAAAA

        We are not in the Outer Western Spiral Arm of the Galaxy, according to history, we never have been. We are 80,000 light years over the other side (Eastern) of the Galaxy, closer to the center in a short arm called Orion's spur. Check it out.

        https://www.google.com/search?q=posi...3u_xWNqdMB6FM:

        The thing is Whatti, I was always an Astronomy buff and it was always talked about and shown in literature and text books where we were, the outer western spiral arm. (outer part of the Sagittarius Arm) Not anymore.

        Out of all the the Mandela Effects, this ones probably the biggest.

        Double take, I hope so.
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        • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
          Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

          "We are not in the Outer Western Spiral Arm of the Galaxy, according to history, we never have been. We are 80,000 light years over the other side (Eastern) of the Galaxy, closer to the center in a short arm called Orion's spur. Check it out.
          Bollocks. According to The Guide:

          Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the Western Spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun.

          Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea.
          Douglas Adams: The Foreword to the Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy
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          • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
            Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

            That's just one reference to it, paying lip service to what the text books said. Carl Sagan made reference to as did our latest popular Astronomer, Tyson. Here's a clip from one of his science shows just a couple of years ago giving our address in the Galaxy. I wonder what he would say now if asked.


            And a still from the science fiction movie, "Starship Troopers" also paying lip service to our position. Where we are now would be much closer to the giant ants planet.

            https://www.google.com/search?q=star...5e6aoJvP1fZxM:

            I'm sorry man, I was brought up and taught in school that we were in the outer western spiral arm of the Galaxy. This was reinforced by my keen interest in Astronomy. I read a lot of books on it.

            So for me, this is one of the greatest contradictions that has been lumped in with being part of the mandela effect examples.

            I also remember a more friendly yellow tinted sun growing up, not that brilliant white, super hot thing we can not even bring ourselves to get near to looking at just for a second now. It looks wrong, The sun's rays look wrong.

            Anyway, putting Mandela effects aside, I am genuinely puzzled as to how we could have got it so wrong.
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            • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
              Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

              bollocks snipped
              You do realise that the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy is classified as "humour" rather than "science" don't you? I used the quote in the same context that the book does. Everyone else seems to have interpreted it in the manner which I intended. Except you. Never mind.
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              • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
                Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

                You do realise that the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy is classified as "humour" rather than "science" don't you? I used the quote in the same context that the book does. Everyone else seems to have interpreted it in the manner which I intended. Except you. Never mind.
                Except it was paying poetic lip-service to the accepted reality at the time.

                Tyson said we were, Sagan said we were and I read about it so many times myself. but we are not now anywhere near close.

                You can choose to call it a bit of a mystery or just sleep and ignore it because you could never conceive such a thing happening.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by sani345 View Post

    What strange misconception did you have as a child?
    I thought that adults were smart. It came as a real shock when I found out that most adults are barely smart enough to get by.
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    • Profile picture of the author yukon
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      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I thought that adults were smart. It came as a real shock when I found out that most adults are barely smart enough to get by.



      True.

      I assumed doctors knew what they were doing most of my life, until an ER doctor tried to send my wife home after she had two strokes in less than an hour after being sent home from being in the hospital for a week for something completely unrelated.

      I got the family doctor to come to the ER, he told me her symptoms look like a stroke before any test were done, had her transferred to another hospital where they confirmed the strokes. She was in the hospital for an additional month.

      The doctors that actually helped (another hospital) told me she wouldn't have survived If she went home from the ER visit.

      Some people just show up for a paycheck, or stressed out and make bad decisions. I probably should have sued the ER doctor and first hospital but was just happy my wife ended up being ok.

      I guess my point is, don't believe people (anyone) If there's the slightest doubt in your mind that what they say/do isn't right. When it comes to health, get two or three opinions.
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    • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I thought that adults were smart. It came as a real shock when I found out that most adults are barely smart enough to get by.
      Your parents had a strange misconception, hence you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    I began reading books at age 3 - and by 6 I was reading westerns and about King Arthur's court.

    I thought there really were 'knights' and 'cowboys' and (maybe) dinosaurs- but they lived on other parts of the world. They were all 'real' to me - but lived somewhere else.

    I got over my gullibility as I grew up - and the first time I saw an MMO product telling me "make money fast/easy - big bucks" - I said "get real!". Been fascinated ever since at the people that remain gullible as adults.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      I began reading books at age 3 - and by 6 I was reading westerns and about King Arthur's court.
      I began reading books at 2....Ok, maybe not really reading them...it was more like chewing on them.


      When I was a little kid I was obsessed with Superman. My dad would read the comics to me...and I was enthralled. I bought a few of those comics on E-bay, out of nostalgia.

      My God, what stupid stories they were...but it all sounded great to a 4 year old kid.

      And as a kid, I was absolutely certain that if I could just get a Superman costume, I could fly. In fact, I believed that I would be able to learn to levitate until I was in my mid teens.

      I'm surprised I ever survived to adulthood.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I'm surprised I ever survived to adulthood.
        Trust me, you aren't the only one.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

          Trust me, you aren't the only one.
          That's the same thing you said to me right after we had sex.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
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    What strange misconception did you have as a child?

    I could be president.






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    • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
      Originally Posted by yukon View Post

      I could be president.
      Your hands are too big.
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      Why do garden gnomes smell so bad?
      So that blind people can hate them as well.
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      • Profile picture of the author yukon
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        Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

        Your hands are too big.
        That's what she said.
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  • Profile picture of the author CustServFan
    I took everything very literally. I remember when I was four years old and overheard a conversation about a great-aunt being fired from her job. I began sobbing. My grandfather, who was telling the story, looked panicked and asked my why I was so upset. I asked him why my aunt was set on fire.
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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Originally Posted by yukon View Post

    True.

    I assumed doctors knew what they were doing most of my life, until an ER doctor tried to send my wife home after she had two strokes in less than an hour after being sent home from being in the hospital for a week for something completely unrelated.

    Some people just show up for a paycheck, or stressed out and make bad decisions. I probably should have sued the ER doctor and first hospital but was just happy my wife ended up being ok.

    I guess my point is, don't believe people (anyone) If there's the slightest doubt in your mind that what they say/do isn't right. When it comes to health, get two or three opinions.
    I never do, probably explains why when the evidence is against some pre school answer, l don't believe it.


    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    I began reading books at 2....Ok, maybe not really reading them...it was more like chewing on them.

    .
    I have to ask the question, ummm,.....no l don't?

    Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

    So, as a child you had the misconception that millions of dollars were being wasted on technologies which didn't exist back then instead of a technology that still doesn't exist.

    I would have if l could!

    Originally Posted by hardraysnight View Post

    there was no santa claus
    Now you have scarred Whatti's and Claude for life!

    Just don't mention Easter Bunnies?

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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

    That's just one reference to it, paying lip service to what the text books said. Carl Sagan made reference to as did our latest popular Astronomer, Tyson. Here's a clip from one of his science shows just a couple of years ago giving our address in the Galaxy. I wonder what he would say now if asked.

    I'm sorry man, I was brought up and taught in school that we were in the outer western spiral arm of the Galaxy. This was reinforced by my keen interest in Astronomy. I read a lot of books on it.

    So for me, this is one of the greatest contradictions that has been lumped in with being part of the mandela effect examples.

    I also remember a more friendly yellow tinted sun growing up, not that brilliant white, super hot thing we can not even bring ourselves to get near to looking at just for a second now. It looks wrong, The sun's rays look wrong.

    Anyway, putting Mandela effects aside, I am genuinely puzzled as to how we could have got it so wrong.
    Thanks, but the sun reference???

    Remember everything looks bigger when you where a kid.


    Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

    You do realise that the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy is classified as "humour" rather than "science" don't you? I used the quote in the same context that the book does. Everyone else seems to have interpreted it in the manner which I intended. Except you. Never mind.
    I almost did!

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    • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
      Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

      Thanks, but the sun reference???

      Remember everything looks bigger when you where a kid.




      I almost did!

      Where did I mention the sun looking bigger? I was referring to it's color and brightness.
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  • Profile picture of the author whiteangelcl
    The platform moves to the train and let me to get on instead of the train arrives at the platform.
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  • Profile picture of the author gainerp
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    I was thinking that people are smart because of reading then later i came to know it depends on the individual
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  • Profile picture of the author thahzin
    I used to believe that if the feather of a peacock placed inside my book eventually after a few days it will grow to a peacock.
    Doesn't even think that there is no room for anything in a closed book.
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  • Profile picture of the author jahirsirag
    You've probably heard that we only use 10 percent of our brains. ... myth is just a "typo of the mind," akin to a trivial factual error that does not betray a scientific misconception. ... from the perspective of my own experience" -- starts with the mind of the child, then moves to the brain ... STRANGE CONTAGION
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    When I was really young..maybe 4 or 5 years old, I didn't know that dreams were not real.

    And I didn't understand why I could fly like Superman at night, but not during the day. I would wonder if it was because I didn't have a cape...or because I wasn't running fast enough.

    I remember playing with a small toy car...and trying to shrink down so I could drive it....and wondering why it didn't work.

    To a young child, all things are equally possible...equally real.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      When I was really young..maybe 4 or 5 years old, I didn't know that dreams were not real.

      And I didn't understand why I could fly like Superman at night, but not during the day. I would wonder if it was because I didn't have a cape...or because I wasn't running fast enough.

      I remember playing with a small toy car...and trying to shrink down so I could drive it....and wondering why it didn't work.

      To a young child, all things are equally possible...equally real.

      >Re: What strange misconception did you have as a child?

      That Claude wouldn't be so strange and weird once he grew up as he was as a kid...man, was I wrong.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nice Sabino
    Originally Posted by sani345 View Post

    What strange misconception did you have as a child?
    The stitch mark is a centipede that got stuck inside the skin. Or a mark you get after being bitten by a centipede.

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  • Gotta say, that centipeedsy stitch mark looks like what most people wanna do to my mouth when I am shootin' it off.

    Ha - but those suckers underestimate my cunnin'!

    See, cos when I was a kid, misconceptualizin' 'bout my fyooture as a matyoor adult, I figured most grown-ups talked outta their assholes.

    An' so ... like Dr YummyCumberbatch-Strange learnin' the mystic ways at the feeta the Ancient Blonde Gal ... I knelt before my esteemed elders an' mastered the waysa buttspeak.

    Tellya, now I am old an' gray an' wizened an' wise, I can go speak a loada crap with anywan, jus' like a regular grown-up, an' nowan never suspects I am no immature ditz.

    I would wanna call this "crossin' the Rubicon".
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Princess Balestra View Post

      Gotta say, that centipeedsy stitch mark looks like what most people wanna do to my mouth when I am shootin' it off.

      Ha - but those suckers underestimate my cunnin'!

      See, cos when I was a kid, misconceptualizin' 'bout my fyooture as a matyoor adult, I figured most grown-ups talked outta their assholes.

      An' so ... like Dr YummyCumberbatch-Strange learnin' the mystic ways at the feeta the Ancient Blonde Gal ... I knelt before my esteemed elders an' mastered the waysa buttspeak.

      Tellya, now I am old an' gray an' wizened an' wise, I can go speak a loada crap with anywan, jus' like a regular grown-up, an' nowan never suspects I am no immature ditz.

      I would wanna call this "crossin' the Rubicon".
      My guess is that it took me three times as long to read tthis post...as it took you to write it. But it was worth the journey.
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      • Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        My guess is that it took me three times as long to read tthis post...as it took you to write it. But it was worth the journey.
        Actschlly Claude, it took a WHOLE DAY.

        I sweated, an' I gritted deep, an' I battled on ...

        an' that was BEFORE I LOST MY FIRST FRICKIN' ARM.

        But I appreciate your comment ... an' love so how comprehensibility wins out in the end.

        (I am typin' this with my teeth btw on accounta how I wrenched my other arm off tryin' to fit my first arm back inta its frickin' socket. Such are the perilsa diligence.)
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  • Profile picture of the author David Tacadena
    That Pluto was a planet! Now, I'm here learning with my 3yr. old son that Pluto is a dwarf planet and part of the Kuiper belt(bodies beyond Neptune). Before there were 9 planets now there's only 8. Ugh!
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    • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
      Originally Posted by David Tacadena View Post

      That Pluto was a planet! Now, I'm here learning with my 3yr. old son that Pluto is a dwarf planet and part of the Kuiper belt(bodies beyond Neptune). Before there were 9 planets now there's only 8. Ugh!
      No, there are 9 now, NASA, (for want of a better word) has verified that a dead gas giant is circling our sun, a considerable distance away.

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    • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
      Originally Posted by David Tacadena View Post

      That Pluto was a planet! Now, I'm here learning with my 3yr. old son that Pluto is a dwarf planet and part of the Kuiper belt(bodies beyond Neptune). Before there were 9 planets now there's only 8. Ugh!
      They at one time thought Pluto was a planet. With more Satellites, better telescopes and more advanced Technology. They discovered it was a dwarf planet.
      Guess it must be a Mandela effect
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  • Profile picture of the author whiteangelcl
    I thought little men live in inside the TV
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  • Profile picture of the author JasonTheFreeman
    When I was a kid my I thought if I get wounded the food I ate would come out of my wound.
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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

    Is that counting Uranus?
    Due to contractual obligations in the great state of Wooster, l am unable to voice an opinion on this subject.

    When Claude puts his hot strawberry jam, (usually extracted from hot jam donuts) onto a contracts page and seals it with the Wooster Bathhouse and Sauna seal, (usually depicting two men,...pfft never mind) it is all binding.

    At least til the leather straps give way.


    Originally Posted by JasonTheFreeman View Post

    When I was a kid my I thought if I get wounded the food I ate would come out of my wound.
    That's nice!
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