What's the difference between "old" and "new" information?

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I'm wondering why the most practical information I've received on a certain topic is in a book published in 1983

Adjusting for inflation (obviously), I have found more practical step-by-step instructions; tips I never saw in HOURS of YouTube videos

Full disclosure: I LOVE print. To me, nothing beats curling up with a book, armed with a highlighter pen or two.

I feel I should tell someone today that there are still treasures to be found in those dusty "old" books...
#heath #money and power
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
    With certain topics, the passage of time has no effect on the validity of "vintage" information. Further, old information is often dressed up to appear new. Sometimes the new spin does nothing but obscure the information.

    An example of this will occur in this very thread. Claude will come stomping in here bloviating as usual. He will say the same thing I've said. My thoughts, however, will be first and more precisely stated.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

      With certain topics, the passage of time has no effect on the validity of "vintage" information. Further, old information is often dressed up to appear new. Sometimes the new spin does nothing but obscure the information.

      An example of this will occur in this very thread. Claude will come stomping in here bloviating as usual. He will say the same thing I've said. My thoughts, however, will be first and more precisely stated.
      I have to agree with the much smaller version of myself.

      For example, the best books on marketing are written by advertisers in the 1930s and 1940s. They have the actual test results and know what works. Most books on marketing are just authors reading these older masterpieces...and trying to sound like they thought of it first.

      Books on technology, most sciences, and internet marketing need to be very current, or you'll read things by real experts that are simply no longer valid. I had thousands of dollars in internet marketing courses I bought 10 years ago, that are mostly worthless today.

      But I have books on copy writing, marketing, selling, psychology that are just as valid today as when they were written decades ago.

      Just because something is newer, doesn't make it better. Riffle is a perfect example of that.

      PS I do not stomp as I bloviate. Stomping makes it harder for me to type. Although I was actively bloviating the entire time I was writing this post...there was no stomping at all.

      Riffle's claim was Fake News.

      And any pictures of Riffle's wife and son...came with his wallet.
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    • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
      An example of this will occur in this very thread. Claude will come stomping in here bloviating as usual. He will say the same thing I've said. My thoughts, however, will be first and more precisely stated.
      Sorry Dan, error there, it is the weekend so, "Rolling in here", is more accurate.

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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
    Right on cue.
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  • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
    I agree with the premise that everything new is really old stuff given a new coat of varnish.

    As proof of this, every old thread in the OT forum ends up with Riffle and Claude trading insults.

    Lo and behold, a new thread is started and we can already see the path it's heading down.
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    Arguing with an idiot is like playing chess with a pigeon.
    It'll just knock over all the pieces, poop on the board, and strut about like it's won anyway.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
      Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

      I agree with the premise that everything new is really old stuff given a new coat of varnish.

      As proof of this, every old thread in the OT forum ends up with Riffle and Claude trading insults.

      Lo and behold, a new thread is started and we can already see the path it's heading down.

      One of the main reasons 'why' we love them.
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  • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
    "New" information is relative. If someone reads a modern day Robert Kiyosaki or Tony Robbins book, the modern day reader will consider the information "new" because it's new to them. However, the concepts are as old as money and investing.

    Someone else can read a Dale Carnegie or Warren Buffet book, implement the principles and do well, and consider that information "new" as well.

    How "new" information is defined is important as we're all receiving new information daily (hopefully). When it was originally thought of or developed doesn't really matter as long as the information serves the reader or the doer well.

    For example, implementing old technological or stock market information probably would not serve people well in present time.
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  • Noo balls aside (cos it is my turn to lick 'pon Information's "Goodie Sack" with a view to seapratin' out cool stuff from mebbe less cool stuff), gotta wonder 'bout perpituity of intrinsic BOUNCY.


    In yogah class, this is the point at which the teacher says, "aaaaaaahn' breathe" ... if'n only to staaahp me asphyxiatin' on my own Beginnah Mind gone nutzoid.


    Thing is for Moi, the diffrence between information as a commodity an' information as a process.

    That is bcs most stuffs I learned back in the day turned out kinda useless bcs I learned 'em offa seemingly inflooential people gowin' noplace.


    Don't wanna get all Transformational Hype Guru withya here, but that is the moment I looked in a mirror an' said WHO NEEDS MORE'N 2 BOOBIES IF'N THEY HANG KINDA EVEN AN' DON'T PRECLOOD YOU FROM GOWIN' SWIMMIN'?

    In our inevitably exotic reprocessin' of hoomanity's finer trooths, we likely all wanna refine luxury of existence an' pass it on sum way.


    Like Attilla-La-La the Hun said, "if I'd known about Feelgood Movies, maybe I'd have slain fewer people and circulated more fake news big on dancing girls."
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Originally Posted by ceeczar View Post

    I'm wondering why the most practical information I've received on a certain topic is in a book published in 1983
    Someone saw an opportunity to make a buck? Probably an Internet Marketer.
    Originally Posted by ceeczar View Post

    Adjusting for inflation (obviously), I have found more practical step-by-step instructions; tips I never saw in HOURS of YouTube videos
    Probably 'wannna-a-b' Internet Marketers. Though they did accomplish their YT goal of getting views. Obviously, their goal is not accuracy.
    Originally Posted by ceeczar View Post

    Full disclosure: I LOVE print. To me, nothing beats curling up with a book, armed with a highlighter pen or two.

    I feel I should tell someone today that there are still treasures to be found in those dusty "old" books...
    ... 19 percent of high school graduates can't read (2017). It also means that 21 percent of adults in the U.S. read below a 5th grade level, and 19 percent of high school graduates can't read.

    Unfortunately, a large percentage of those find a way to this forum. Want proof? Wait until they show up in this thread with "I agree" "Great infornation" (they can't spell either).
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    • Profile picture of the author Odahh
      Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

      Someone saw an opportunity to make a buck? Probably an Internet Marketer.

      Probably 'wannna-a-b' Internet Marketers. Though they did accomplish their YT goal of getting views. Obviously, their goal is not accuracy.

      ... 19 percent of high school graduates can't read (2017). It also means that 21 percent of adults in the U.S. read below a 5th grade level, and 19 percent of high school graduates can't read.

      Unfortunately, a large percentage of those find a way to this forum. Want proof? Wait until they show up in this thread with "I agree" "Great infornation" (they can't spell either).
      You know I am sure a a majority of people are completely lost when they here people take in terms of 15percent or 27 or 45 percent . Especially when percets are used to scare people

      I could always read at a pretty high level ..writing and spelling you think my typing is bad if I had to sit down and write stuff out by hand . The only person who would understand anything from it would be a hand writing specialist able to put a personality profile together
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      • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
        Originally Posted by Odahh View Post

        You know I am sure a a majority of people are completely lost when they here people take in terms of 15percent or 27 or 45 percent . Especially when percets are used to scare people

        I could always read at a pretty high level ..writing and spelling you think my typing is bad if I had to sit down and write stuff out by hand . The only person who would understand anything from it would be a hand writing specialist able to put a personality profile together
        Percentages (math) can be a double edged sword when in conversation.
        One edge may affect the people that 'can' read and understand the math. The other edge may have no affect on people that 'cannot' read and understand the math.

        Similarly ...

        Percentages ( math) can be a double edged sword when in the written word.
        One edge may affect the people that 'can' read and understand the math. The other edge may have no affect on people that 'cannot' read and understand the math.

        The differences are conversation and the written word.

        In context with my post I am talking about Internet Marketing wherein the majority of Internet Marketers can read and understand percentages, so they write for customers that can also read and understand percentages. Those customers are the "target market."

        In contrast, people that have special needs are in the ... 19 percent of high school graduates can't read (2017). etc. etc. Those customers are not the "target market."
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  • Profile picture of the author sallaid
    Before all info more clear and now they make it short . But books will never die!
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  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

    Unfortunately, a large percentage of those find a way to this forum. Want proof? Wait until they show up in this thread with "I agree" "Great infornation" (they can't spell either).
    Originally Posted by sallaid View Post

    Before all info more clear and now they make it short
    Jeffey -"You rang" ( Quoting Learch from the original Addams Family show)
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  • Profile picture of the author Warwarman
    That is very rare case when it works well with old books. Information is a product that expires fast.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Warwarman View Post

      That is very rare case when it works well with old books. Information is a product that expires fast.
      I agree. I think all books over ten years old should be burned.

      And I agree that information expires fast. What was true 5 years ago, no matter the subject, cannot possibly be true today.

      I think we are making progress here.
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      • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I agree. I think all books over ten years old should be burned.

        And I agree that information expires fast. What was true 5 years ago, no matter the subject, cannot possibly be true today.

        I think we are making progress here.
        Nope, disagree there, l went to our state library to get hold of some old books for research, and read an 1880 book on Chess, as well as a 1930, or there abouts book on games.

        The Chess one used a lot of terms not used that much today and used examples of players long gone, but the moves and strategies were still as relevant today as it was back then.

        Some things don't change much, so l don't agree.

        I understand Kindle and storing a lot of books in them, but some people love books.

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        • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
          Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

          Nope, disagree there, l went to our state library to get hold of some old books for research, and read an 1880 book on Chess, as well as a 1930, or there abouts book on games.

          The Chess one used a lot of terms not used that much today and used examples of players long gone, but the moves and strategies were still as relevant today as it was back then.

          Some things don't change much, so l don't agree.

          I understand Kindle and storing a lot of books in them, but some people love books.

          Sometimes you gotta read between the lines, Shane.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by tagiscom View Post

          Nope, disagree there, l went to our state library to get hold of some old books for research, and read an 1880 book on Chess, as well as a 1930, or there abouts book on games.

          The Chess one used a lot of terms not used that much today and used examples of players long gone, but the moves and strategies were still as relevant today as it was back then.

          Some things don't change much, so l don't agree.

          I understand Kindle and storing a lot of books in them, but some people love books.

          Shane.....Dear Shane.

          I was joking. The best advertising and marketing books I've ever read were written in the 1930s. I have books on logic and rational thinking that were written in 1910, and the principles and examples are still relevant today.

          At home, I have a personal library of over 2,000 books, mostly on sales, marketing, advertising, brain physiology, psychology, and philosophy. My most prized possession.

          Some are pretty current, but most were written decades ago. Classics.

          The only books I've read that are outdated are books on internet marketing. I've listened to, and read, dozens of courses on internet marketing. A year or so ago, I just threw them all in the dumpster. All woefully outdated.

          I wrote a book on local internet marketing that has to be updated about every 3 years.

          Technology changes rapidly. But human nature stays the same.

          I have a first edition book on logic written in 1880. Other than grease spots on the paper (a natural reaction to a century in storage), it's in great shape, and I got a lot out of it.
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          • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            <snip>

            I have a first edition book on logic written in 1880. Other than grease spots on the paper, (a natural while eating fried chicken when reading) it's in great shape, and I got a lot out of it.

            Corrected that for you.
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            • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
              Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

              Corrected that for you.
              Thank you for doing the Lord's work, Jeffrey.
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            • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
              Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

              Corrected that for you.
              The Force grows stronger within you my son
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          • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
            Similar to what Claude said: Many of the best books of Copywriting were years and years ago ... ("Scientific Advertising" and "The Robert Collier Letter Book" for example.) "Old" doesn't necessarily mean "outdated."

            There's a whole wealth of information in these old classics.
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          • Profile picture of the author Kurt
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Shane.....Dear Shane.

            I was joking. The best advertising and marketing books I've ever read were written in the 1930s. I have books on logic and rational thinking that were written in 1910, and the principles and examples are still relevant today.

            At home, I have a personal library of over 2,000 books, mostly on sales, marketing, advertising, brain physiology, psychology, and philosophy. My most prized possession.

            Some are pretty current, but most were written decades ago. Classics.

            The only books I've read that are outdated are books on internet marketing. I've listened to, and read, dozens of courses on internet marketing. A year or so ago, I just threw them all in the dumpster. All woefully outdated.

            I wrote a book on local internet marketing that has to be updated about every 3 years.

            Technology changes rapidly. But human nature stays the same.

            I have a first edition book on logic written in 1880. Other than grease spots on the paper (a natural reaction to a century in storage), it's in great shape, and I got a lot out of it.
            And it's NOT a collection and don't you let anyone tell you it is!
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      • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I agree. I think all books over ten years old should be burned.

        And I agree that information expires fast. What was true 5 years ago, no matter the subject, cannot possibly be true today.

        I think we are making progress here.
        No, you got it wrong. It's only books on Quantum Physics that need to be burned every 5 years.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

          No, you got it wrong. It's only books on Quantum Physics that need to be burned every 5 years.
          If you read an encyclopedia on any of the sciences, they are mostly outdated ten years later. Math is different.


          This isn't really for you. I just like pontificating.
          I don't know anyone that could read a book on quantum physics...and even understand the math. Me included.

          Literally every time I read about quantum physics, it's from someone who know nothing about even simple physics.

          It's like someone reading "It's so advanced, it's simple" and it sounds insightful to them, when really it means nothing.

          It reminds me of when my parents used to say to me "There is only a thin line between genius and madness". It sounds like it holds a real secret....but it's nonsense.

          And saying Quantum Physics is the same as saying "unknowable" or "it's a paradox". It's said to sound "in the know", and hide the fact that they don't know the answer.
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          • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            It reminds me of when my parents used to say to me "There is only a thin line between genius and madness"
            I wish that were true: Because it would mean I'm a really, really genius. (Lol) *Scratches Head*
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          • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            If you read an encyclopedia on any of the sciences, they are mostly outdated ten years later. Math is different.


            This isn't really for you. I just like pontificating.
            I don't know anyone that could read a book on quantum physics...and even understand the math. Me included.

            Literally every time I read about quantum physics, it's from someone who know nothing about even simple physics.

            It's like someone reading "It's so advanced, it's simple" and it sounds insightful to them, when really it means nothing.

            It reminds me of when my parents used to say to me "There is only a thin line between genius and madness". It sounds like it holds a real secret....but it's nonsense.

            And saying Quantum Physics is the same as saying "unknowable" or "it's a paradox". It's said to sound "in the know", and hide the fact that they don't know the answer.
            Oh it's very much for me. Because there is no other branch of science remotely likely to ever scientifically explain what I call intangible but exists and you call impossible.and does not.

            No need to go into any detail on this and it's not just so I can say: "I told you so" either.

            I really want to be vindicated by measurable, provable scientific discovery and consensus.
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          • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            <snip>
            And saying Quantum Physics is the same as saying "unknowable" or "it's a paradox". It's said to sound "in the know", and hide the fact that they don't know the answer.

            Johnny (RIP) would have known.
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    You may have heard of a concept called the Lindy Effect (originally Lindy's Law) which holds (loosely) that the longer some non-perishable things have been around, the longer we can expect them to survive.

    Nassim Taleb, in his book Antifragile, applied this concept to ancient wisdom and to books in particular, suggesting that if a book has been in print for 100 years, for example, the chances of it still being in print in 100 years' time are greater than for any book published subsequently. Further, every year that passes without extinction doubles that book's additional life expectancy. A sort of reverse aging process.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindy_effect
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

    Thank you for doing the Lord's work, Jeffrey.
    As Opted-In would have said "Your Welcome." (Please don't hurt me.)

    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    That's fat shaming.

    I'm just letting you know that I've reported you to my support group.....the National Association Of Marlon Brando Look Alikes. (or NAMBLA)
    WARNING Don't Google NAMBLA.

    Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

    The Force grows stronger within you my son
    Yeah, Viagra can't touch this.


    Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

    No, you got it wrong. It's only books on Quantum Physics that need to be burned every 5 years.
    and...
    One Call Closing
    Sales Prospecting
    Selling Local Advertising
    Selling Essentials
    Local Online Marketing
    The Unfair Advantage Small Business Advertising Manual
    One Call Closing
    Just joking Claude.



    Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

    And it's NOT a collection and don't you let anyone tell you it is!
    Somehow I get the impression the "personal library" is more of a "personal library of coloring books."
    Just joking Claude.
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    • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
      Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

      As Opted-In would have said "Your Welcome." (Please don't hurt me.)


      WARNING Don't Google NAMBLA.


      Yeah, Viagra can't touch this.



      and...
      One Call Closing
      Sales Prospecting
      Selling Local Advertising
      Selling Essentials
      Local Online Marketing
      The Unfair Advantage Small Business Advertising Manual
      One Call Closing
      Just joking Claude.




      Somehow I get the impression the "personal library" is more of a "personal library of coloring books."
      Just joking Claude.
      Just leave out the "Just joking Claude" bit and your training will be complete.
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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    Shane.....Dear Shane.

    I was joking. The best advertising and marketing books I've ever read were written in the 1930s. I have books on logic and rational thinking that were written in 1910, and the principles and examples are still relevant today.

    At home, I have a personal library of over 2,000 books, mostly on sales, marketing, advertising, brain physiology, psychology, and philosophy. My most prized possession.

    Some are pretty current, but most were written decades ago. Classics.

    The only books I've read that are outdated are books on internet marketing. I've listened to, and read, dozens of courses on internet marketing. A year or so ago, I just threw them all in the dumpster. All woefully outdated.

    I wrote a book on local internet marketing that has to be updated about every 3 years.

    Technology changes rapidly. But human nature stays the same.

    I have a first edition book on logic written in 1880. Other than grease spots on the paper (a natural reaction to a century in storage), it's in great shape, and I got a lot out of it.
    Phew, that's good, we don't want you goosestepping and such.

    Yes, l expected the 1880 Chess book to be a mess, but was surprised to find it in near perfect condition.

    But this was stored in a temperature controlled room, and could only be viewed in a safe room.

    Thankfully l didn't need white gloves either, although if l had ordered the Hoyles Rules of Games, 1770, (more or less) first edition, l would have, (and amazingly still in print, obviously updated).


    Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

    Corrected that for you.
    Dammit!

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  • Profile picture of the author mindtricks18
    Old information is useful to know the history and to learn something without self-experience, without involving on some matters.
    New information makes you excited to know some innovative and can attract you to involve and take its experience.
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