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'Murder Hornets' in the U.S.: The Rush to Stop the Asian Giant Hornet NY Times May 2020

Excerpt:
BLAINE, Wash. -- In his decades of beekeeping, Ted McFall had never seen anything like it.



As he pulled his truck up to check on a group of hives near Custer, Wash., in November, he could spot from the window a mess of bee carcasses on the ground. As he looked closer, he saw a pile of dead members of the colony in front of a hive and more carnage inside - thousands and thousands of bees with their heads torn from their bodies and no sign of a culprit.

In Japan, the hornets kill up to 50 people a year. Now, for the first time, they have arrived in the United States.
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

    'Murder Hornets' in the U.S.: The Rush to Stop the Asian Giant Hornet NY Times May 2020

    Excerpt:
    BLAINE, Wash. -- In his decades of beekeeping, Ted McFall had never seen anything like it.



    As he pulled his truck up to check on a group of hives near Custer, Wash., in November, he could spot from the window a mess of bee carcasses on the ground. As he looked closer, he saw a pile of dead members of the colony in front of a hive and more carnage inside - thousands and thousands of bees with their heads torn from their bodies and no sign of a culprit.

    In Japan, the hornets kill up to 50 people a year. Now, for the first time, they have arrived in the United States.
    Makes you wonder at this point, what the hell else is going on in Washington State we need to know about?
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

    Makes you wonder at this point, what the hell else is going on in Washington State we need to know about?

    In Japan, the hornets kill up to 50 people a year. Now, for the first time, they have arrived in the United States.
    The miles of wooded landscapes and mild, wet climate of western Washington State makes for an ideal location for the hornets to spread.

    In November, a single hornet was seen in White Rock, British Columbia, perhaps 10 miles away from the discoveries in Washington State -- likely too far for the hornets to be part of the same colony. Even earlier, there had been a hive discovered on Vancouver Island, across a strait that probably was too wide for a hornet to have crossed from the mainland.

    Makes me wonder how the hornets got to such remote locations all the way from Japan.

    Killer bees from in the South and Murder Hornets in the North to include the virus everywhere and anywhere. Whats next?
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    • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
      Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

      Makes me wonder how the hornets got to such remote locations all the way from Japan. Someone important them to create another Silence of the lambs movie, this time without Butterflies. On more serious note maybe they built a nest in a shipping container or a vehicle that was imported to North America once here they departed to the trees.

      Killer bees from in the South and Murder Hornets in the North to include the virus everywhere and anywhere. Whats next?
      The killer bees were imported from South Africa to South America for use by Science and escaped the lab,than slowly migrated to North. if I remember correctly.

      What next don't know but it looks like more pandemics in the future if we are not careful -
      https://nypost.com/2020/05/02/stop-d...ientists-warn/
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    • Profile picture of the author socialentry
      Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

      Makes me wonder how the hornets got to such remote locations all the way from Japan.

      I brought them here.
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  • Gotta figure hornets got a survival advantage bcs color scheme.

    See ... cos for sure they would grow real sweet hunny if'n only people quit swattin' em' for long enough.

    For Moi, biggest ishoo is the Sleepin' Nekkid Test.

    What is the GODAWFUL THING I want sneakin' around on my flesh THE LEAST?

    Tellya, I would favor a hornet ovah a WHATTO SPIDAH any day -- even if it scored a direct hit in my ass.

    I don't want no rats or snakes either, an' course, you can't get no SHARKS in any kinda slumber victim scenarios less'n you in a movie directed by a frickin' psycho.

    Creachah I would hate most?

    JELLYFISH.

    Even if it got no stingers, I would not be comfortable with no jellyfish floppin' around next to Moi at dead of night.

    See, cos here is an animyool evolved into a designah HAT before the cosmos discovered either designahs or hats.

    Layin' next to that kinda stuff got all the FEAR of Alien suckin' on Nostromo guy's face -- without any IRL actshwaahn.

    Hhhrrrr!

    My knees're knockin' now.

    Why in hell do I check in here anyways?

    It is like a recipe for perpetyool terror ...
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
    That's the name of my new gangster rap group.
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    If you want me to go on arguing, you'll have to pay for another five minutes.

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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Does anyone know of a service with overnight murder hornet delivery to Wooster Ohio? Asking for a bunch of friends.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Just How Dangerous Is the 'Murder Hornet'?
    ScientificAmerican.com By Paige Embry on May 6, 2020



    Asian giant hornets start a mass assault on a honeybee hive in Hase Valley in Japan's Nagano Prefecture. Credit: Alastair Macewen Getty Images


    Excerpt:
    The Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia) has arrived in North America. In the past several days photographs and videos have surfaced showing how viciously this insect has attacked honeybees: it crawls into hives and rips off the heads of bees in large numbers--making its supervillain nickname, "murder hornet," feel disturbingly apt. Government agencies and local beekeepers have sprung into action, hoping to eradicate the hornet before it can consolidate a foothold in the continent. Success may lie in how predator and prey interact naturally.
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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

    Does anyone know of a service with overnight murder hornet delivery to Wooster Ohio? Asking for a bunch of friends.
    Fiverr has one, "I Will Deliver Your Pesky Murder Hornets For $5".


    Although l would go with the $10 upsell, he hits the box against the wall before knocking!


    Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

    Funny you say that. I have a thread awaiting approval about it. Time will tell.
    "Sigh"!
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  • Profile picture of the author DURABLEOILCOM
    I wonder do these Asian Giant Hornets have any natural predators in North America?
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