Your favorite science subject during high school?

by Raz
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Is it physics, chemistry, or biology? My favorite is physics. Personally for me it's the easiest science subject among those three. How about you?
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  • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
    Originally Posted by Raz View Post

    Is it physics, chemistry, or biology? My favorite is physics. Personally for me it's the easiest science subject among those three. How about you?
    I went to school in England UK. We don't have things called High Schools. When you get to 11 you take a test and either go to a Grammar School or Secondary School, Grammar School was for kids with the highest scores. I went to a Secondary.

    Also, we had no Chemistry classes, just Physics and Biology. I was more interested in Physics than Biology and did pretty well in it. We also had gardening classes for the first year or so. My teacher had a poster on the wall done by a student. It read: "Plants grow by Inches but are killed by Feet" Yes, this was before we went metric.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
      Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

      Yes, this was before we went metric.
      I still remember the one week in third grade roughly 40 years ago when we studied the metric system. I remember Mrs. Boxler saying, "You guys really need to learn this because America will convert to the metric system before you're out of junior high school."

      When's the last time you bought a 1/3 meter sub from Subway?
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      • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
        Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

        I still remember the one week in third grade roughly 40 years ago when we studied the metric system. I remember Mrs. Boxler saying, "You guys really need to learn this because America will convert to the metric system before you're out of junior high school."

        When's the last time you bought a 1/3 meter sub from Subway?
        And yet you use base ten in coinage, one hundred cents in a dollar etc. When I was a kid their was 144 pennies in a pound, crazy. It was for some reason easy to have that changed to 100 pence to a pound, we even had half new pence coins for a while but that soon got taken out of circulation. However, the measurement of centimeters for length and kilograms for weight was a more difficult pill to swallow. We had to make it illegal for stores to weigh out pounds and ounces and remove imperial weighing scales.

        The one time I really appreciated small measurements being in millimeters was when I was a printer and cut up paper and card to sizes using that scale. It made total sense and subsequently not difficult to convert too. But, I still would go into a sweet shop and ask for a quarter of this and half a pound of that. I have not changed in that respect. Even now, young store working people who never experienced imperial still seem to accommodate on that front. Still enough imperial memories and people who used them around but that will soon disappear in the UK and Europe.

        "5, 5 dollar, 5 dollar 30.48 centimeter long" does not sound right, lol.
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      • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
        Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

        I still remember the one week in third grade roughly 40 years ago when we studied the metric system. I remember Mrs. Boxler saying, "You guys really need to learn this because America will convert to the metric system before you're out of junior high school."
        My vocational teacher said the US would never change fully to the metric system because the old-timers in charge will resist change, especially if it costs money. Working in the automotive field since the mid 70's all US cars eventually switched to the metric system. Personally, I use a metric tape measure over a standard tape measure because fractions s*ck IMHO.
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        • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
          Originally Posted by DWolfe View Post

          My vocational teacher said the US would never change fully to the metric system because the old-timers in charge will resist change, especially if it costs money. Working in the automotive field since the mid 70's all US cars eventually switched to the metric system. Personally, I use a metric tape measure over a standard tape measure because fractions s*ck IMHO.
          My dad said basically the same thing when he saw my homework. "You'll only need that if you move to Europe." Then he probably spent the next hour rambling about Communism.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

            My dad said basically the same thing when he saw my homework. "You'll only need that if you move to Europe." Then he probably spent the next hour rambling about Communism.
            Well? Did he ever convince you to become a communist?

            Talking about the metric system.....This is the funniest SNL skit of the entire show that night. You'll enjoy it, I'm sure.

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        • Profile picture of the author Odahh
          Originally Posted by DWolfe View Post

          My vocational teacher said the US would never change fully to the metric system because the old-timers in charge will resist change, especially if it costs money. Working in the automotive field since the mid 70's all US cars eventually switched to the metric system. Personally, I use a metric tape measure over a standard tape measure because fractions s*ck IMHO.
          That's because the parts to the cars were built all over the world. Basically the USA stuck with the emperial system of measurement because almost all of our capital equipment in the USA was built and design with parts standardized in emperial system. So it would have been far too expensive to switch over.

          Plus it gave the USA another way to be different from the rest of the world. When those differences where a part of what made living standard better in the USA. Now it's not necessarily better.The USA tends to just have more of everything.


          I don't remember any of the science stuff I learned in school I went to a private high school so we where still using typewriters to learn typing . the typing teacher was also the accounting teacher. And the same teacher taught the science subjects and I believe religious studies.

          I learned far more about chemistry and biology while I was working in food processing in my early 20s.
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    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

      Yes, this was before we went metric.
      We haven't really gone metric - for most things that matter in everyday life, the imperial system still rules.

      Distances are still measured in inches, feet, yards and miles. Sports such as football, cricket, horse racing and others have kept to the traditional units of length. Road signs are in miles. Speed limits are in miles per hour. We speak of someone's height in feet and inches - and their weight in stones and pounds. People still use acres when describing land.

      We talk of a car's economy in miles per gallon. It's true that petrol (gas) stations display their prices per litre, but that's just to make them look slightly less extortionate than they actually are.

      And, of course, we still buy beer in pints in the pub and milk in pints at the grocers.

      It's just a pity we seem to have lost the bushel.
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      • Profile picture of the author Princess Balestra
        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post


        It's just a pity we seem to have lost the bushel.

        Mine still up for pecks.
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  • Profile picture of the author alex fankle
    My favorite subject is physics. For me it is the coolest science subject as compared to biology & chemistry. Other both subjects have 100% theory.
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  • Profile picture of the author Princess Balestra
    Gotta figure GRAVITY is intrinsic to all the sciences.

    Physics kinda spins on the stuff, chemicals combine or repel without battin' an eyelid, an' biology favors attractional smoochie ovah most othah slooshins.

    Thing is, whatevah the gravitayshwnnl forces in alla these areahs, you can measure 'em anyways you like an' same will always be samah than arbitrary distintschwaahn.

    For sure, centimeters big up the numbahs bettah than inches on anythin' you wanna grab in yr hand or slip down yr throat, but when I shoppin' for zucchini in my local store, only two questions command my intrest:

    1) Will'n I incinerate this on sight the moment I combine its gloriously joosy vegetable length an' girth with any kinda RECIPE it is DOWN TO MOI to actschlly MANIFEST?

    2) Gotta get in here quick with this baby bcs natchrl watah retentschwaahn floppiness gonna rendah alla my Zero Culinary Dreems kinda visionary when the fkr wiltin' in muh hand bcs mortal.

    Yeah, so I wouild wish always for science to gravitate us maximally toward sum kinda myootchlly advantageous happnin' stuffs.

    Alternative is death by chaos or life by Play Us, I guess.

    (Where is Oziboomah, btw? Gotta figure he would make with trooly informative smarts 'bout a zucchini hurled boomerang style vs pulla the planet.)

    Gravity & orbits.

    A natchrlly pulsin' truth 'bout all stuffs makesya wanna leap up an' kiss out.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ra Tube
    In the past, I found physics to be quite challenging, but there was a strong enthusiasm for conducting experiments in real life. I performed numerous experiments using the available resources. Now, I am a Chemical Engineer, and my interest in experimental work has continued to grow.
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  • Profile picture of the author Moodesburn1977
    i liked chemistry because you got to do experiments, and there was a crazy teacher they called the doc, just like dr from back to the future lol
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    I loved science in school...

    I took physics 1, 2, and 3. I also took quantum physics.

    Then in the second grade...
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    History

    I've always loved stories

    Stories are how humanity AS A SPECIES makes sense of its collective memory and expenses

    As I got older, I realized the power of HISTORY as a NARRATIVE

    When you talk to someone about History, a lot of the times, the FRAMING they choose and the TOPICS they dwell on says A LOT ABOUT:

    their personal politics
    how they think things should be
    their ideas about HUMAN NATURE
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    • Profile picture of the author discrat
      Originally Posted by writeaway View Post


      When you talk to someone about History, a lot of the times, the FRAMING they choose and the TOPICS they dwell on says A LOT ABOUT:

      their personal politics
      how they think things should be
      their ideas about HUMAN NATURE
      Politics are strictly forbidden in any way, shape, or form. No exceptions !!

      J/K
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  • Profile picture of the author sumitnirala
    My favorite subject was Organic Chemistry.
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  • Profile picture of the author Moodesburn1977
    It would have to be chemistry, he was a bit mad, he was might to be teaching but loved experiemnts, a bit like hm from back to the future, he told me he want to build a time machine lol
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    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by Moodesburn1977 View Post

      It would have to be chemistry, he was a bit mad, he was might to be teaching but loved experiemnts, a bit like hm from back to the future, he told me he want to build a time machine lol
      He sounds like the teacher I had in 2064.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    Your favorite science subject during high school?
    Come on! Ask a real question. The answer for me is zero. Nada. None. Never. LOL

    Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Physics.

    Biology was interesting, but I hated dissecting frogs and other little animals.

    I think my interest in science was because I could study science without much social interaction, and I had a science teacher, Mister Snyder, that was a gifted teacher.

    I think the teacher has a lot to do with whether you are interested in a subject or not.

    He would give us a science question an then say "Work it out". He wanted to know our thought process, how we used what we already knew. He was the one who got me interested in logic and rational thinking.

    It wasn't just "read and memorize" with him. He taught us how to reason. And I'll forever be grateful to him.
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