I actually DO need a Dog Training ebook!

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Today I became the proud owner of Blue the Siberian Husky. ( she is stunning)

I got her from the Animal shelter here in Cyprus however she is going to need training!

Which is the best dog training resource?

Anyone in this niche?
#dog training
  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    At your service - click my sig for the product...........and incidentally -- your pup is a working class breed. They are exceptionally intelligent and loyal - My eguide is called
    "Smart Beyond Obedience" and your guy will respond to this method like no tomorrow.
    If you want references - ThomM knew my dog - who died recently from complications due to severe old age.

    Enjoy your puppy! I'm still looking for mine.
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    Sal
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Two things you need to know right now...You live in Cyprus but have a dog bred for the Artic. You need to be aware of how the heat will affect your dog.

    Second, huskies were bred to run. And run. And run. They may be the greatest long-distance runners in the animal world. If they don't run, they won't be happy. And, they will likely give you some problems if they get frustrated due to lack of exercise.

    They are also bred to pull...In addition to obedience training, maybe get your dog some type of wagon/sled that he/she can be taught to pull. IMO, a lot of bad dog behavior is caused by a lack of exercise and boredom.
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    • Profile picture of the author Radix
      I currently have two huskies.

      They are the most unambitious, lazy and self centered dogs I've ever had. They're almost like cats trapped in a dog's body. Maybe my expectations are too low.

      I expect them to eat, sleep and poop and not necessarily in that order. Even that is too much effort at times.
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      • Profile picture of the author Heidi White
        congrats on your new puppy!

        good luck.
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        • Profile picture of the author Intrepreneur
          I have read many ebooks on the web on dog training. PLR, MRR the lot. None of them were satisfactory enough to fill in the gaps. I'd recommend going for one of Cesar Milan's books instead. He has a knack for explaining it how it is while making it understandable.

          Oh but one book you MUST check out which is an ebook is "How to Teach Your Dog 100 English Words". Forgot about that one. It's super.. a smarter dog is a more obedient dog.
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          • Profile picture of the author Kay King
            Cesar is excellent. Though the breed is usually one requiring a lot of exercise, not all will be energetic and they make great pets.

            One thing I would suggest is finding a club or large pet shop that offers some owner/dog training classes - because it helps socialize the dog with other dogs and that's important.

            Training any dog is a matter of learning to communicate with your animal so he knows what you expect of him.

            kay
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          • Profile picture of the author HeySal
            Originally Posted by Intrepreneur View Post

            Oh but one book you MUST check out which is an ebook is "How to Teach Your Dog 100 English Words". Forgot about that one. It's super.. a smarter dog is a more obedient dog.
            Exactly what I teach people - if you know how, you can teach a dog anything you want to except stuff like pronouns and prepositions, etc.

            Any verb and noun can be taught........and once you teach them the animal CAN learn to string them together to make complex meanings even if the old Evelyn Woods books say you can't. You can go from there to helping your dog learn to use "bridging assumptions" also known as inference.

            Munchie went from "go get your leash" "go get my shoes" and so on to just being able to tell what to get when I said "get ready to go hiking" "get ready to go swimming" and so forth. He knew what hiking and swimming were and he knew what we took when we went...it can take work to get them to that point....or should I say a lot of play and exercise?

            Dogs are much smarter than a lot of even the training "experts" seem to realize. I never trust anyone to know how to teach my dog since I've seen show trainers tell people the only way to teach a dog is with a shock collar. Wanted to put that collar on them and see what they learned from it. If you use a shock collar on a gentle giant or other working class dog, you can end up with a crazy dog. Electric fences, too. Put a Mastiff behind an electric fence and he not only will charge through the shock barrier if he thinks something/someone is a threat, but after receiving the shock will have taken it to be agression and when the dog gets to the object he is charging he's ready to kill.

            Dogs are smart.........it's people that are stupid.
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            Sal
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            • Profile picture of the author lcombs
              Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

              Exactly what I teach people - if you know how, you can teach a dog anything you want to except stuff like pronouns and prepositions, etc.

              Any verb and noun can be taught........and once you teach them the animal CAN learn to string them together to make complex meanings even if the old Evelyn Woods books say you can't. You can go from there to helping your dog learn to use "bridging assumptions" also known as inference.

              Munchie went from "go get your leash" "go get my shoes" and so on to just being able to tell what to get when I said "get ready to go hiking" "get ready to go swimming" and so forth. He knew what hiking and swimming were and he knew what we took when we went...it can take work to get them to that point....or should I say a lot of play and exercise?

              Dogs are much smarter than a lot of even the training "experts" seem to realize. I never trust anyone to know how to teach my dog since I've seen show trainers tell people the only way to teach a dog is with a shock collar. Wanted to put that collar on them and see what they learned from it. If you use a shock collar on a gentle giant or other working class dog, you can end up with a crazy dog. Electric fences, too. Put a Mastiff behind an electric fence and he not only will charge through the shock barrier if he thinks something/someone is a threat, but after receiving the shock will have taken it to be agression and when the dog gets to the object he is charging he's ready to kill.

              Dogs are smart.........it's people that are stupid.
              It's amazing the kind of crap that gets passed on as professional advice!
              My wife and I bred and raised Bichons for about 15 years.
              I actually read a Bichon training book that suggested spiked collars for training.

              There's another book by the same author of "Teach Your Dog 100 English Words"
              I can't recall her name off-hand but she's a holistic vet.
              It's called "Longer Life For The Dog You Love".

              I highly recommend it.

              LC
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              • Profile picture of the author HeySal
                Originally Posted by lcombs View Post

                It's amazing the kind of crap that gets passed on as professional advice!
                My wife and I bred and raised Bichons for about 15 years.
                I actually read a Bichon training book that suggested spiked collars for training.

                There's another book by the same author of "Teach Your Dog 100 English Words"
                I can't recall her name off-hand but she's a holistic vet.
                It's called "Longer Life For The Dog You Love".

                I highly recommend it.

                LC
                I ALWAYS train my dogs via the same method that I give in my WSO report. There is no reason we can't communicate very specifically with our dogs. I have always had Rotts. They get very big very young and are extremely strong - yet the thought of having to use anything with spikes or electricity to teach them anything is just bizarre. I wouldn't trust anyone who will use that type of thing to go NEAR my friends. I just want to strap the thing on their own necks and see what it does to "train" them.

                Actually, to me, training is a stupid word -- a dog just needs to be taught. They WANT to be able to communicate. I learn my own dogs signals as well as teaching him mine. I've never had a dog that I couldn't just talk to and they always respond just fine, even if in their own language.

                Munchie was hilarious to teach. He was the most pig-headed animal I've ever met - of any breed. When teaching him to lay down I had to get ahold of his front legs and actually lean against him all the way to the ground - then I would make a big fuss petting him and telling him "good boy" - it made people laugh and I got some pretty rude comments until a few months later all I had to to is give him a signal and he'd lay down without words spoken. Hahahahahaha. God I miss that dog. Will have to start all over again with "potty outside". Soon, I hope.
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                Sal
                When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
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          • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
            Originally Posted by Intrepreneur View Post

            Oh but one book you MUST check out which is an ebook is "How to Teach Your Dog 100 English Words". Forgot about that one. It's super.. a smarter dog is a more obedient dog.
            In fact, researchers now believe that a dog is capable of learning up to 150 English words. That's better than some article writers I've seen

            Sal, you may already be aware of this, but I was reading in a recent edition of The New Scientist about the wonderfully named "Clever Dog Lab" in Vienna, Austria. Experiments there are demonstrating a hitherto unknown level of cognitive awareness in canines. Some of the discoveries they've made include evidence that dogs are able to use logic in learning new words and that they actually have a sense of fairness.

            It's fascinating.

            Scientists Show That Canines Have a Sense of Fairness


            Frank
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            • Profile picture of the author HeySal
              Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

              In fact, researchers now believe that a dog is capable of learning up to 150 English words. That's better than some article writers I've seen

              Sal, you may already be aware of this, but I was reading in a recent edition of The New Scientist about the wonderfully named "Clever Dog Lab" in Vienna, Austria. Experiments there are demonstrating a hitherto unknown level of cognitive awareness in canines. Some of the discoveries they've made include evidence that dogs are able to use logic in learning new words and that they actually have a sense of fairness.

              It's fascinating.

              Scientists Show That Canines Have a Sense of Fairness


              Frank
              Frank - never read that -- but I could have told you that. I had to take cognitive science for my linguistics courses and every one of my dog has shown higher cognitive skills -

              I started by teaching my guys the word collar, leash, shoes, backpack, towel, etc. Then I would teach them the words for different activities - hike, swim, etc. Then when they know that you can start pointing out that you are going [here], what do we need to take [here] and telling them everything they need - it goes like this:

              Get ready to go: swimming
              No ready - get your collar - get mom's shoes - get towel
              Okay ready to go swimming now.

              After they can handle all that, then it's just a jump before when you tell them to get ready to go somewhere and they will make the assumption that they need to get everything for that "go".
              That is called a bridging assumption and is a very high level cognitive skill.

              My guy even knew when we needed to turn around and head back to the car because we were "losing daylight".
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              Sal
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              • Profile picture of the author Michael Motley
                Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

                Frank - never read that -- but I could have told you that. I had to take cognitive science for my linguistics courses and every one of my dog has shown higher cognitive skills -

                I started by teaching my guys the word collar, leash, shoes, backpack, towel, etc. Then I would teach them the words for different activities - hike, swim, etc. Then when they know that you can start pointing out that you are going [here], what do we need to take [here] and telling them everything they need - it goes like this:

                Get ready to go: swimming
                No ready - get your collar - get mom's shoes - get towel
                Okay ready to go swimming now.

                After they can handle all that, then it's just a jump before when you tell them to get ready to go somewhere and they will make the assumption that they need to get everything for that "go".
                That is called a bridging assumption and is a very high level cognitive skill.

                My guy even knew when we needed to turn around and head back to the car because we were "losing daylight".
                Rotties are a pretty smart breed. I had a buddy that had 2 Rotties and they were indoor dogs. Great dogs and each had their own distinct personality and way you had to deal with them.

                Their names were Odin and Thor. Odin was the smart one, you could look in his eyes and see he knew things. Thor wasn't so smart, but he was a big ball of muscle. When you looked in his eyes, the first thing that came to mind was 'duh'. But he was a big teddy bear. Odin was always the protector when Thor wanted to wrestle..which was pretty much all the time.

                When my friend was out of town i used to go give the boys their baths and they knew what their role was. When was was getting a bath, the other stood in a certain spot and waited patiently. Then when it was time to switch, there was no messing around (because it was cold usually) and everyone got in their spot quickly.


                But the big time fun really started when baths were over and it was drying time. I dont know how many pieces of furniture were broken or houseplants knocked over when I would jump on Thor with the official drying blanket when we were done. He thought that was the greatest thing in the world. Well that and a chew toy.
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      • Profile picture of the author Arbitrager
        Originally Posted by Radix View Post

        I currently have two huskies.

        They are the most unambitious, lazy and self centered dogs I've ever had. They're almost like cats trapped in a dog's body. Maybe my expectations are too low.

        I expect them to eat, sleep and poop and not necessarily in that order. Even that is too much effort at times.
        haha just exactly like mine. I still love her thou.. Husky so adorable.. aaa
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    • Profile picture of the author valerieSONORA
      Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

      Two things you need to know right now...You live in Cyprus but have a dog bred for the Artic. You need to be aware of how the heat will affect your dog.

      Second, huskies were bred to run. And run. And run. They may be the greatest long-distance runners in the animal world. If they don't run, they won't be happy. And, they will likely give you some problems if they get frustrated due to lack of exercise.

      They are also bred to pull...In addition to obedience training, maybe get your dog some type of wagon/sled that he/she can be taught to pull. IMO, a lot of bad dog behavior is caused by a lack of exercise and boredom.
      Ooohhh can I get a sled or wagon and have some huskies pull me in it as transportation so I can cancel that awful car insurance?
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  • Profile picture of the author beckham319
    Thanks Simon for the post and for the valuable responses. I was lurking as both a dog lover and book publisher. Unfortunately, I had to give my miniature Pinscher away since my kids couldn't take care of her properly. But she was the smartest dog I ever had, following hand signals without our speaking.

    As a publisher, I'm looking at reprinting a book on Laika breeds of Russia:
    Amazon.com: Hunting Laika Breeds of Russia...Amazon.com: Hunting Laika Breeds of Russia...
    But I'm wondering if it would reach a larger market if we modified it a bit more so that it is more than just a history of the breed and what the characteristics are and becomes more of a guide to raising and training the dog. And would there be any affiliate possibilities for the dedicated web page we would construct?

    Thanks for any feedback, and I will now need info on finding the eguide, "Smart Beyond Obedience."

    Cheers,
    Barry
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  • Profile picture of the author Shoaib
    Originally Posted by thehypnoman View Post

    Today I became the proud owner of Blue the Siberian Husky. ( she is stunning)

    I got her from the Animal shelter here in Cyprus however she is going to need training!

    Which is the best dog training resource?

    Anyone in this niche?
    Hey. I used to promote the ebook "Secrets Of A Professional Dog Trainer" by Adam Katz a few years ago for a while. I always found it to be a bit funny that he's a dog trainer and his last name is KATz.

    Adams Dog Training and Dog Behavior

    I had also e-mailed him a few times with questions and he was pretty quick to get back to me.

    They have switched to a membership model since then but the ebook can still be downloaded from the member's area I believe.

    Other than that, you can't go wrong with the Dog Whisperer (Cesar Milan)!
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  • Profile picture of the author wayne_harris
    I've owned several breeds of dogs over the past 40 years.........having grown up on the farm with Beagles, Collies, German Shepherds and a Husky. The Beagle was the most difficult to manage and train. The Collie and German Shepherd breed is much easier and cooperative.
    The first and most important thing to learn is what trainer Caeser Millan says........"the dog owner needs the most training". Dogs will learn from an owner who speaks their (dog) language. My dogs were easier to train once I learned to speak their language and understand their mindset. Another important lesson is to train everyone in the family to use the same 'one word' commands and handling technics when sharing time with the family dog. Dogs will respond to single word commands, but cannot find meaning from complete conversational sentences.
    I also recommnd a book called "The Dog Whisperer" by Paul Owens.
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  • Profile picture of the author NinjaTech
    so cool . puppies are great and huskys are super smart.
    congrats a dog can change your life.
    i found kennel training really easy to potty train puppys check it out some call it crate training..
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  • Profile picture of the author Audrey Harvey
    I can't fault Karen Pryor's Karen Pryor Clickertraining <- not an affiliate link. This lady trained dolphins before she trained dogs, and you can't put a leash on a dolphin. Loads of good videos on her site.

    Just out of interest, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior is less than impressed with Cesar Milan.

    VIN News
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    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by Audrey Harvey View Post

      I can't fault Karen Pryor's Karen Pryor Clickertraining <- not an affiliate link. This lady trained dolphins before she trained dogs, and you can't put a leash on a dolphin. Loads of good videos on her site.

      Just out of interest, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior is less than impressed with Cesar Milan.

      VIN News
      What they fail to mention is the number of "vicious" dogs Cesar has saved that vets and kennels said couldn't be changed and needed to be put down.
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      • Profile picture of the author Audrey Harvey
        Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

        What they fail to mention is the number of "vicious" dogs Cesar has saved that vets and kennels said couldn't be changed and needed to be put down.
        From dog training gone bad - Veterinary Community Blog post - Find it all here.

        "Within the first 5 seconds, the handler kicks the dog in the abdomen. When the dog turns toward him he is jerked off his feet. A struggle ensues where the handler gets bitten several times and the dog is seen to be struggling for air. Finally he gets the dog onto the ground and the dogs tongue is blue and the dog is gasping for breath. When he finally gets the dog up it appears that there might be urine on the ground and that the dog voided his bladder in distress."

        There's gotta be a better way, hasn't there? I mean, these are animals who are our companions. Why would you subject your dog to that sort of handling, without exploring alternative methods of getting the results you want?

        Even if Cesar's methods "work", the training has to be carried on at home, and it can be tricky for people new to training dogs to get the timing right, particularly with punishment. I'd love to see any follow on stories of dogs he's cured twelve months later.
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        • Profile picture of the author Kurt
          Originally Posted by Audrey Harvey View Post

          From dog training gone bad - Veterinary Community Blog post - Find it all here.

          "Within the first 5 seconds, the handler kicks the dog in the abdomen. When the dog turns toward him he is jerked off his feet. A struggle ensues where the handler gets bitten several times and the dog is seen to be struggling for air. Finally he gets the dog onto the ground and the dogs tongue is blue and the dog is gasping for breath. When he finally gets the dog up it appears that there might be urine on the ground and that the dog voided his bladder in distress."

          There's gotta be a better way, hasn't there? I mean, these are animals who are our companions. Why would you subject your dog to that sort of handling, without exploring alternative methods of getting the results you want?

          Even if Cesar's methods "work", the training has to be carried on at home, and it can be tricky for people new to training dogs to get the timing right, particularly with punishment. I'd love to see any follow on stories of dogs he's cured twelve months later.

          First, the clip in question isn't on the page that was linked to, so it's hard to tell.

          But I will say this, I've watched the Dog Whisperer many times and NEVER saw him kick a dog in the stomach. He will tap a dog in it's flanks with his foot to distract a dog that is focuses/obsessed on something it shouldn't be. But kick, never.

          And I've never seen him choke a dog. Again, he uses the leash to distract dogs that aren't focusing on him.

          Remember, he doesn't do obedience training, he does rehablitation. As for the training, Cesar himself says he doesn't train dogs, he trains people. If people are still having problems after a year, then they likely need more training. And yes I agree, the timing is very important.

          There was a case where one of his trainers seemed to have crossed the line, but it never went to court and the exact details are sketchy.

          Now what about my concern of the dogs Cesar has saved that vets and others said had to be put down? Cesar has NEVER had to put a dog down (AKA KILL). Can your "expert" say the same thing?
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  • Profile picture of the author Audrey Harvey
    I have no doubt that "my expert" who happens to be a board certified veterinary behavioralist (so you really don't need the inverted commas, she really is an expert), has had to KILL dogs because of behaviour problems. I have also KILLED dogs because of behaviour problems including aggression.

    You've never seen him kick a dog or choke a dog, that doesn't mean it hasn't happened. Yes, the video is gone.

    "Millan freely admits to having no formal education or any qualifications or credentials in psychology or, indeed, any of the canine behavioural sciences such as ethology. He goes to some lengths to differentiate between 'human' psychology and 'dog' psychology.

    In a nutshell his 'dog psychology' involves showing dogs who is the boss - the 'Alpha' - if necessary by physical means (normally a jerk on the lead but sometimes a neck scruff or an 'alpha roll')"


    Dominance theory has been tossed out the window when it comes to training dogs:

    The Alpha Theory: based on a misguided premise - by Debra Millikan

    Another comment from a brilliant dog trainer (read her book Culture Clash, it will open your eyes):

    Jean Donaldson, director of training at the San Fransisco SPCA, says 'practices such as physically confronting aggressive dogs and using choke collars for fearful dogs are outrageous by even the most diluted dog training standards ...... a profession that has been making steady gains in its professionalism, technical sophistication and human standards has been greatly set back. I have long been deeply troubled by the popularity of Mr Millan as so many will emulate him. To co-opt a word like 'whispering' for arcane, violent and technically unsound practice is unconscionable'.

    Take 3 puppies:

    One pup will be genetically sound, will stay with its littermates until it is 8 weeks old, and will be well socialised and trained by an intelligent owner. It will be a fantastic companion.

    Another pup, also genetically sound, may be taken from its litter too early and miss out on essential socialisation and may go to a home where the owners don't bother about correct socialisation. This pup will have problems, most will get by, but some will need help. Most can be rehabilitated with some good hard work. They don't need to be alpha rolled to show who is boss.

    Third type of pup, wired badly in the brain , it does occur and it's often genetic. No amount of socialisation, training, behaviour modification will make these dogs safe.

    I know of one veterinary specialist who hasn't had to KILL any dogs in the second group, she has successfully rehabilitated them using positive methods, and has never had to alpha roll them. She does indeed KILL dogs in the third group.

    You don't need to dominate, scruff, choke or alpha roll a dog to rehabilitate them. There are other ways.

    We might just have to agree to disagree on this one, Kurt

    And in case you ask, I did own an aggressive dog. I'm an extremely good dog trainer, I've titled dogs in obedience and owned the first dog in Australia to gain a masters title in agility. I took my dog to a veterinary behavioralist here in Aus and he asked me why I wasn't planning on specialising in the subject, because I knew what I was on about. This dog was a basket case, in spite of my doing everything right. Her full litter sister was the same.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    You're right, killing dogs isn't violent and is much better than rolling a dog on its back.

    Tell that to my rotty that at 3 months old chased my ex onto the bed in an aggressive temper tantrum. We then bought the book "How to be your dog's best friend", which also teaches alpha rolls, and was suggested by our vet.

    After she showed who was boss, he never had an agressive act and was the most passive dog one could ask for. All from simply rolling him on his back until he submitted.

    Your mistaken saying the alpha roll is violent or cruel. What is this based on? You make allegations against Cesar which you can't back up. If I haven't seen the cases of abuse, how did your people?

    BTW, my rotty learned 75-80 voice commands. I think I did a great job training him and EVERY vet I took him to complemented me and what a great job I did with him. He was the pride of my life and probably the best thing I ever did.

    >Third type of pup, wired badly in the brain , it does occur and it's often genetic. No amount of socialisation, training, behaviour modification will make these dogs safe.

    Take them to Cesar. He's taken ferral dogs, plus plenty of rotties and pits that your "experts" say are hopeless and rehabilitated them.

    You will NEVER convince me that killing a dog instead of using an alpha roll or other techniques Cesar uses is better for the dog or society or less violent simply because they are murdered in a "humane" fashion. Sorry, type all you want, it won't change this simple fact.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Kerr
    You should take some training tips from a neighbor of mine. This is a VERY loud woman at the best of times and her method of training is to scream a word, generally "NO" or "SIT" over and over and over at the dog. The dog will inevitably grow up believing it's name is NO and will be a nervous wreck, never knowing what it is supposed to do.
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  • Profile picture of the author cormierl20
    why dont you just contact a center that offers dog training services?the people on that dog training center are experts and you could save time and effort in training you dog..
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