The British Slang Thread.....

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Ok - you Brits have some interesting words that I had never heard of before.

In another thread on the main forum Kim Standerline and Bev Clement used some words I liked:

Plonker - which means kind of a wally.
Wally which means Daft.

Now I don't know what daft means.

I invite you brits to put your slang words here with definitions. It will be fun to make fun of people over here without them knowing what I am saying.
#british #slang
  • Profile picture of the author Samsmiles
    Hi Tim

    You have the term "bum". Over here thats a slang word for "ass" as in she has a nice.........!

    Prosperity!

    Samsmiles
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
    Some less offensive ones Tim. All basically mean the same, daft, idiot wally, plonker- all interchangeable.

    twonk, twit, eejit, plank, prat, pillock, barmpot, dimwit, nitwit

    There are a lot more more offensive ones, but I'll leave that for others to post.

    Peter
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    • Profile picture of the author naonline
      Originally Posted by Peter Bestel View Post

      Some less offensive ones Tim. All basically mean the same, daft, idiot wally, plonker- all interchangeable.

      twonk, twit, eejit, plank, prat, pillock, barmpot, dimwit, nitwit

      There are a lot more more offensive ones, but I'll leave that for others to post.

      Peter
      Nice one Peter, nice to see some Scottish entries!

      I'll add spanner to the mix.

      Nick
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  • Profile picture of the author Kim Standerline
    Another fave of mine is numpty

    daft is when your being silly

    what about tosspot

    As a nurse of 30 years standing I have a heap of the sort to make Pete Bestel go pale, best not use them in a public place, I might get banned lol

    Kim

    Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

    Ok - you Brits have some interesting words that I had never heard of before.

    In another thread on the main forum Kim Standerline and Bev Clement used some words I liked:

    Plonker - which means kind of a wally.
    Wally which means Daft.

    Now I don't know what daft means.

    I invite you brits to put your slang words here with definitions. It will be fun to make fun of people over here without them knowing what I am saying.
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  • Profile picture of the author Richie Bigrac
    This should keep you going for an hour or two.

    Dictionary of English slang and colloquialisms of the UK
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    • Profile picture of the author kentuckyslone
      Originally Posted by Richie Bigrac View Post

      This should keep you going for an hour or two.

      Dictionary of English slang and colloquialisms of the UK
      That was very good. I dont know why but I have always loved British humor and these slang words just make it funnier.
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  • Profile picture of the author Thomas
    The Brits usually just nick Irish slang and pretend it's theirs but here's one they (probably) came up with by themselves:


    "Oi! You Foookin wankaaaa!"

    Translation: I'm a very pleasant articulate fellow.
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    • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
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      • Profile picture of the author Mike Wright
        The topical slang expression is obviously
        "Merchant Banker" meaning "Wanker" .

        Its a sobering thought to realise that that
        has been around for years ... and is not
        strictly topical albeit probably accurate imho
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul1234
    There's definitely a market for it. Was it Coca-Cola who had to scrap a $25 million foreign advertising campaign because of a particular word they used that happened to cause great offence?
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
      Here's a few more 'idiot' terms:

      loon, galoot, chube, dipstick, divvy, plant pot, daftie

      and a real Scottish one that I especially like,

      windae-licker (trans. window licker!)
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      • Profile picture of the author Neil Morgan
        Ha!

        This should be fun! I don't know where to start!

        I bet there are only a few of us here that know what a 'footer', or even 'footerer' is!

        And...

        ...aye, he's nuthin' but a pure ned an' his burd's a pure schemie! Geez a slug o' yer buckie!

        Well Peter, I do hale from Airdrie originally!

        Cheers,

        Neil
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    • Profile picture of the author HeySal
      Originally Posted by Paul1234 View Post

      There's definitely a market for it. Was it Coca-Cola who had to scrap a $25 million foreign advertising campaign because of a particular word they used that happened to cause great offence?
      Coca Cola accidentally ran a campaign somewhere in the orient (I think it was China), based on a straight translation of the "coke ads life" campaign here -- and ended up telling the people over there that "coke will bring your anscestors back from the dead". LOL.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim_Carter
    Originally Posted by Neil Morgan View Post


    Well Peter, I do hale from Airdrie originally!


    Neil

    Airdrie Alberta Canada - or somewhere else lol.
    My parents and sister live there
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    • Profile picture of the author Neil Morgan
      Hi Tim

      The original Airdrie (LOL) - in Scotland. As a youngster I remember being amazed that there was an Airdrie in Canada too!

      I bet there are only a few of us here that know what a 'footer', or even 'footerer' is!
      Someone who footers (ie is a footer or a footerer) can't leave things alone. They're always fiddling with them. Example:

      Stop footering with that squeeze page. It's fine!

      ...aye, he's nuthin' but a pure ned an' his burd's a pure schemie! Geez a slug o' yer buckie!
      Translation:

      Yes, he's just a rough young fellow and his girlfriend was born into a family who lives on a council estate. Please may I have a drink of your tonic wine?

      Does that help Tim?

      Cheers,

      Neil
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
      Or another translation could be...

      ... yeah, he's nottin' but a scal an' 'is tart's from Crockie! Giz a swig of yer Thunder.

      This betrays my roots as a Scouser !!


      Peter
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      • Profile picture of the author John Henderson
        Originally Posted by Peter Bestel View Post

        Or another translation could be...

        ... yeah, he's nottin' but a scal an' 'is tart's from Crockie! Giz a swig of yer Thunder.
        Translated into Teesside "English":

        ...aye, he's nowt but a charver an' 'is lass is a slapper! Howay with that bottle.
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  • Profile picture of the author espacecadet
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    pissed:
    US= angry
    UK=drunk
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    • Profile picture of the author Mal Keenan
      Here's an Irish one - of which there are 100s

      What's the Craic? (Craic pronounced 'Crack') which loosely translated would mean 'How are you, how are you doing and what are you up to? All in one saying. Aren't we Irish geniuses?
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  • Profile picture of the author Phnx
    For some odd reason we use the word 'piss' in various ways.

    pissed (drunk)
    pissed off (fed up/angry/annoyed)
    going on the piss (night on the town)
    taking the piss (taking the mickey/michael; being facetious; having a joke at someone elses expense; making fun of; being snide etc)
    pissing it down (raining heavily)
    pissed as a newt/fart (drunk)

    mmm what else...

    gobsmacked (stunned/amazed)
    gobshite (mouthy person)
    butchers - as in "have a butchers at that" or "lets' have a butchers" (to look at something, derives from 'butchers hook' but the last word is always left off rhyming slang. Mainly South England though it seems to be in use up North too.)
    barney (to have a row or heated disagreement. Seems to derive from 'barney rubble' so could be used for "trouble", though I've never heard it used in that sense.)
    jacksy (alone; on ones own as in "I'm on my jacksy" or I'm going on my Jacks". Think it's from Jack Jones the American singer.)
    shanksy's pony (walking; on foot. "I'm going by..." or "I'm using shanksy's pony". You don't hear this much nowadays)
    gone for a burton (to disappear; no longer around; don't know whether it is linked to Burtons mens clothing store that might have gone bankrupt, or Richard Burton doing a runner at some point, or some equally obsure source.)
    mither (my-ther: means to hassle; harrass; bugging someone, kinda thing. "Stop mithering me". Mainly Northern England)

    All I can think of for the moment.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bev Clement
      Tim I had thought about it, and at the moment the word document is over 90 pages long (single spaced) but as you see there are a number of websites which seem to have it well covered.
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      • Profile picture of the author Lance K
        Originally Posted by Bev Clement View Post

        Tim I had thought about it, and at the moment the word document is over 90 pages long (single spaced) but as you see there are a number of websites which seem to have it well covered.
        That would be a perfect ethical bribe or bonus for anyone with a UK travel guide.
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    • Profile picture of the author Susanrh
      Originally Posted by Phnx View Post

      gone for a burton (to disappear; no longer around; don't know whether it is linked to Burtons mens clothing store that might have gone bankrupt, or Richard Burton doing a runner at some point, or some equally obsure source.)
      mither (my-ther: means to hassle; harrass; bugging someone, kinda thing. "Stop mithering me". Mainly Northern England)

      All I can think of for the moment.

      Gone for a burton
      From fighter pilots in WWII Burton's Ale was a brand of beer.
      Pilots were said to 'Have gone for a Burton' implying they'd gone for a drink, when in fact they were dead or missing in action.
      Warrior humour (humor) lol!
      Susan
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      • Profile picture of the author Phnx
        Originally Posted by Susanrh View Post

        Gone for a burton
        From fighter pilots in WWII Burton's Ale was a brand of beer.
        Pilots were said to 'Have gone for a Burton' implying they'd gone for a drink, when in fact they were dead or missing in action.
        Warrior humour (humor) lol!


        LOL thanks for that, I use the phrase a lot so it's nice to know it's origin.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim_Carter
    Actually I was just kidding about writing the report. Funny someone actually took the time to do it.

    It is like we speak different languages sometimes although we all started from the same one.
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  • Profile picture of the author Phnx
    Another one in common usage: porkies=lies (derives from 'pork pies')
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    None of you mention 'bloody' - is it de rigeur or something, Yo?

    i love it, just bloody well love it.

    wot?

    Slán agus Beannacht (in Ghilege)
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

      None of you mention 'bloody' - is it de rigeur or something, Yo?
      We don't think of that as 'slang', it's like a proper word. At least in my neck of the woods. When I was a kid it was considered swearing, though of the mild kind like sod or bugger. All those words are in every day usage now and nobody bats an eye or considers them swearing, even in "polite company".

      To be honest, so is the F word now for many people.
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  • Profile picture of the author Richie Bigrac
    Mention someones 'Fanny' in the UK and you might not get the reaction you expected
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      LOL, nice one Richie, I forgot about that. Yes, when you guys talk about "fanny packs" we kinda go WTF??

      Shag is not a dance over here either, but if you are a fan of the Austin Power movies you probably figured that one already.

      'Nother one; fags are cigarettes.
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    I don't want to know - but now i know - thanks Bev


    blimey! there is another classic. bloke. (ok i watch too many old movies...)
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      • Profile picture of the author Patrician
        Omigod, you guys eat cigarettes?

        is this gonna be another one i shouldn't ask? (dumb yanks)

        Originally Posted by Bev Clement View Post

        Or tell a Yank that you enjoy eating faggots and see their reaction.

        Patricia you don't want to know
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      • Profile picture of the author Thomas
        Originally Posted by Bev Clement View Post

        Or tell a Yank that you enjoy eating faggots...
        Or tell him you're going to smoke a fag and watch him call the cops...
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul1234
      Originally Posted by Richie Bigrac View Post

      Mention someones 'Fanny' in the UK and you might not get the reaction you expected
      Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

      Dare I ask if a fanny isn't a fanny what is it to you?

      (be nice, I had an Aunt Fannie, but her name was really Sarafina)
      and she had-a the Fine-a Fanny.

      blimey! there is another classic. bloke. (ok i watch too many old movies...)
      fanny - definition of fanny by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
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      • Profile picture of the author Patrician
        oh great - too late to hide the evidence of asking the question. Bev sent me a PM.

        but thanks Paul for a polite way to tell me. you are a real fine English gentleman.

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      • Profile picture of the author MikeHayes
        I never realised there were so many cultured people among the Wariors!!

        Some more.

        bint - girl - from Arabic
        shufti - look - from Arabic. As in "Let's have a shufti."
        yonks - a long time, from 'donkeys', from 'donkey's ears' = years
        daft - more simple than silly

        Cheers,

        Mike
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        • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
          Samuel L Jackson made a ropey film a while back called 51st State. It was set in Liverpool. There was a great scene between him and Robert Carlisle which explained the absurd meanings and difference between the terms; 'bollocks' and 'dogs bollocks'

          If something is 'bollocks' (testicles) it's rubbish

          If it's the 'dogs bollocks' then it means it's the best.

          Go figure!

          Other ones, some specific to Liverpool:

          'Give it toes' - run away, normally used to make a quick exit from a place without paying.

          'Peg it' or 'leg it' - again, run away.

          'Jib it' - hit it or get it away

          'Scal', 'Scally' and 'Scallywag' - a person who is a bit rough and common

          'Sagging' school - playing truant

          'Chinwag' - chat

          'Bizzies' - the police

          'Dead made up' or 'chuffed' - thrilled or really happy

          Other ones for cigarettes:

          'biffters', 'cancer stick', 'loosey' - a single cigarette
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          • Profile picture of the author Bev Clement
            Pat you are OK with faggots as they are a food in the UK. Basically they are meatballs wrapped in intestines. We eat them with proper gravy not the white gravy you have there

            Someone from the UK did a wso not so long ago offering a bespoke service, which totally confused the Yanks.

            The Yanks call it a custom service, we say bespoke.

            Or put a wso up for a fortnight, and see the reaction you get. It might get your listing on fire with the number of people asking what a fortnight is.

            The other one that always gets the Yanks to raise their eyebrow is tell them

            "You will knock them up"

            "Blow me"

            Totally different meanings in the UK to the US.
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            • Profile picture of the author Patrician
              "Bevved Up =
              An alternative defintion of being "drunk". Referring to consuming a few too many "Bevvies". Hence, being "Bevved up"."

              LOL, Bev! ... and if they are totally 'zonked' (*h*t faced) we will call it being Tommied for our Irish friend Thomas. hic!

              Originally Posted by Bev Clement View Post

              Pat you are OK with faggots as they are a food in the UK. Basically they are meatballs wrapped in intestines. We eat them with proper gravy not the white gravy you have there .
              OH, GAG ME WITH A SPOON. (California Valley Girl speak) I will NEVER eat faggots of any kind no matter what side of the pond I am on. BARF ME OUT! (barf=vomit)

              Excuse me, madam. Our gravy can be proper. We have both proper and improper gravy here. One is made with flour and water (improper, same ingredients for glue) and proper they add meat drippings (grease). LOLOLOL. proper gravy... heheheheheheeee

              YEH, PLEASE what IS a fortnight? 4 nights? a week?

              This is fun and so refreshing right now since there is so much financial gloom and doom and general heartbreak.

              LET'S ALL GET SILLY AND STAY SILLY!
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              • Profile picture of the author Thomas
                Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

                ...we will call it being Tommied for our Irish friend Thomas. hic!
                I would be deeply honoured.
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  • Profile picture of the author Elljay
    Oh my god I love this thread. I am from Scotland and some of the words we use amaze even me haha. My boyfried moved up from London a few years ago and some one called him a loon, which up here can mean a boy/man, he took it as someone was calling him a nut case!!!
    Anoher one used up here in the north of Scotland is 'foos yer doos?' I dont use this personally, it is more used by the old farmers, but it means 'how's your pigeons?' I still have no idea why you would ask anyone how their pigeons are!!!!

    I am sure there are loads more but a lot of them tend to be pretty offensive, what a lovely bunch we are:-)

    Jacqui x
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeHayes
      Yes Jacqui,

      A loon's a lad and a quine's a lass. They are Scots farming words for young bull and cow. That's one of the things I learnt when I was up at Kinloos in the 60's.
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    I heard this from a ladie from the UK I used to date, but someow I never can remember it right...
    it's either drop a penny or is it leave a penny?

    Phnx:"Shag is not a dance over here either, but if you are a fan of the Austin Power movies you probably figured that one already. "

    Shag is a dance here but it also has the same meaning as in Austin Powers.It also is a name for a regional tpe of music.
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
      I think you're refering to 'spend a penny', which is a euphemism for going to the bathroom/toilet. It comes from the charge made for using public toilets.

      Peter
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    Pete, you're right...like I said, I never can remember it correctly.
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  • Profile picture of the author e-mail2u
    Here is a couple of Cumbrian one's,

    Divn't dee that yer divvy!

    translation:

    don't do that you idiot

    Horney ( it's not what you think)

    Translation :
    Policeman/woman

    Sometimes whenyer git caught playin' hikey dikey, ole gadgees'll git the 'orneys.

    some times when playing hikey dikey the old people call the police.

    hikey dikey: a game where the aim is to jump over as many different peoples garden fences in a row before you get caught.

    Here one that still gives me a giggle/chuckle more for us Brits.

    my inlaws are American and my father in law is always

    "laughing his fanny off"
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  • Profile picture of the author djarchi
    My roommate is from "across the pond" and when ever he feels under the weather he says he feeling a little "dodgy".
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Wright
    Pikey .... Irish Traveler

    Grut Wazzuck .... big fool

    Lummox ..... clumsy person

    Grut Lummox .... large clumsy person
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    • Profile picture of the author ThomM
      Pat you are OK with faggots as they are a food in the UK. Basically they are meatballs wrapped in intestines. We eat them with proper gravy not the white gravy you have there
      I thought faggot was a bundle of sticks?
      Like on the fourth Led Zepplin album.
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    • Profile picture of the author Thomas
      Originally Posted by Mike Wright View Post

      Pikey .... Irish Traveler
      I thought pikey was for all types of gypsies?

      (Or knackers, as they're called over here.)
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    For some reason I have always thought a fortnight was 2 weeks
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      Originally Posted by KimW View Post

      For some reason I have always thought a fortnight was 2 weeks
      It is.

      I'm still trying to wrap my head around white gravy. Wouldn't that be more of a 'sauce'?
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    There is a 'white sauce' but that is different from improper gravy.

    White sauce is thinner than gravy. Actually I am no expert on gravy - it is more something they use a lot in the South US, for instance on bisquits and just about everything else.

    In the North, it would usually only be PROPER = whenever a roast beef, turkey or chicken, etc., is roasted, then the drippings would be used to build a gravy PROPERLY.

    Actually some totally improper Italians in the East call spaghetti sauce 'gravy' - it is like a meat sauce. I think it is not only improper but totally disrespectful to call spaghetti sauce gravy. lol. i'm serious.
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    Paul, here in the states fat as in good is phat,which one of my daughters also says stands for Pretty Hot And Tasty.
    Phnx.... gravy is very subjective here. Until I moved into the "capital of the south" I thought gravy was made from the drippings of the meat that was cooking with flour or starch added. Here in the south there is white gravy which from my experience, is more peppery adn has a tendency to have things added to it like sausage(bangers in the UK?) and poured over bisquits.
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      Heheh all this talk of food is making me hungry. Grub is used for food, but you guys probably use that too.

      bottle=nerve/courage "Lost his bottle" "he bottled it/out"
      sound=good "How's your business doing?...It's sound" "How are you?...Sound!" Full phrase is 'sound as a pound', presumably from the days when sterling was doing great.
      joss it=die/pop one's clogs - as in "Bob recently jossed it", "when he josses it"
      napper=headcase/nutter particularly irresponsible kind. "he's a total napper"
      geezer=bloke used to be a particular kind of bloke, bordering on criminal but not quite, down to earth working class and imbued with a code of honour. Nowadays it's any fella though probably still working class.
      diamond or top geezer=a particularly splendid variety of the above.
      mutts nuts is a polite form of dogs bollocks=particularly good/terrific.

      faggots are also sticks Thom, but I don't think anyone has cause to use it in that sense anymore. We have central heating these days y'know, no need to gather wood for the fire. Actually with the way things are going.....
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      Originally Posted by KimW View Post

      poured over bisquits.
      Y'see pouring gravy over biscuits sounds crazed to us, as if you are pouring gravy over cookies. I note the spelling so I'm assuming 'bisquit' is something akin to our Yorkshire Pudding?

      Oh yeah, what you call a pot roast we call a joint. Lamb joint, beef joint, "lets get a joint this week".
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    I just knew you were going to scream conspiracy about bisquits because you call bisquits what we call cookies.

    Blah gravy and cookies, no. definitely.

    Bisquits are not pudding either.

    I guess you could say bisquits or biscuits are close to ummmm, do you have muffins? popovers? maybe close to a scone? Dinner rolls?

    They would normally be like little breads - that is little individual thingies made from flour, water or milk and leavening and baked - then either split and buttered, and held in the hand - or laid in the plate with gravy on them and eaten with a fork.

    Also, if you drop the biscuit batter in a stew or soup to boil instead of bake, they are called dumplings, as in chicken and dumplings. They are yummy in this way especially if you love the dough boy like I do.
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

      I just knew you were going to scream conspiracy about bisquits because you call bisquits what we call cookies.
      *snerk* yeah and what you call chips we call crisps; what you call fries we call chips. Actually chips are superior fries, fries are improper chips. :p

      I guess you could say bisquits or biscuits are close to ummmm, do you have muffins? popovers? maybe close to a scone? Dinner rolls?
      Well yeah...but we don't pour gravy on them. The Scots might, I mean they fry Mars Bars in batter so I wouldn't put it past them.

      They would normally be like little breads - that is little individual thingies made from flour, water or milk and leavening - either split and buttered, and held in the hand - or laid in the plate with gravy on them.
      That sounds a bit similar to Yorkshire Pudding to me, but we only ever put gravy on it, and usually have it with roast beef. Though you can bake it with sausages inside (as Kim says, bangers) and then it becomes Toad In The Hole. No idea where that name came from!
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    yeah, what she said! And notch my spelling up to just plain bad spelling!
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    • Profile picture of the author Thomas
      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      What is a "git"?

      Like lazy git etc.
      Anything from a fool to a *******.
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      What is a "git"?

      Like lazy git etc.
      That's a corruption of get and used to be another mild swear word years ago like sod. Got turned into git and it's used much as sod or bugger. "he's a bit of a git", "she's a tight git/get/sod/bugger" (tight=mean as in parsimony). I'd say git is now an everyday word in many places. As Thomas says it can cover a number of situations from fool to ******* so depends what context you use it.

      More..

      nancy boy or nancy =wimp or effiminate used like you use the word 'pussy'
      Also jessie has the same meaning, often preceded by the word 'southern' when refering to Londoners and others from down South (by us Northerners natch ) as in "big Southern jessies/nancy boys".
      slapper=tart
      trollop is also still used
      full monty equivalent to your 'whole nine yards'
      welly=oomph/effort (but in a fun way) "give it some welly"

      I note you guys say you are "standing/waiting in line" for something - we'd say we "queue" or "queue up" for it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Phnx
      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      Please define tart.
      Does it mean slut? I didn't want to type that here.
      Yes. (but it's also a confectionary as well as in 'jam tart'. Our jam is your jelly. Our jelly is your jello.)

      A professional tart (ie prostitute) is often referred to as a brass. Or a tom. That's used more in the South of England (heheh I got that from a programme called The Bill=police. Police also known as The Old Bill or Rozzers or Fuzz depending what part of the country you hail from)
      nonce=paedophile (we put an extra a in the spelling )
      snout is a grass or snitch. Police tend to call their informers that.
      porridge is doing time in prison

      brass is also slang for money "got no brass" or being fed up/annoyed "brassed off".
      cheesed off is another for fed up/annoyed if you are too polite to say pissed off.
      prat or pratt is another word like wally, plonker, pillock etc (ie fool or an idiot).
      tosser is a slightly more polite form of wanker (same as your 'jerk off')
      pisstake same as 'taking the piss' from above post
      jimmy riddle (you probably use that too) is a pee, as in 'going for a....'

      edit: actually I think tom might refer to the punters - the clientele - of said tarts, rather than the ladies themselves. Not sure. Presumably it's short for 'tomcat'.
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    • Profile picture of the author Thomas
      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      Please define tart.
      Does it mean slut? I didn't want to type that here.
      Tart = Slut, whore, slag, skank, slapper, prostitute, tramp, ho, bitch, harlot, hooker...
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  • Profile picture of the author Diana Lane
    Here in Bristol they have lots of ways with speech which amuse me (I've lived here all my life, but my family originally came from Yorkshire and I was brought up to recognise that these ways are not normal!).

    My favourite is 'Alright?'. This is how you're greeted when you meet a Bristolian that you know in the street. It translates as 'Hi!', to which the expected response is 'Alright?'! Meeting him again as you come back the other way, you're greeted with 'Alright?', which by this time translates as 'Bye!', to which you then reply 'Alright?'! This exchange gets a bit much after a while, and I admit that I've crossed the road and pretended not to see people that I know just to avoid it.

    Bristolians also add an 'L' to the end of every word that finishes with a vowel. 'Alright? I've just had a brilliant ideal!' Legend has it that a Bristolian once went out of town where he mistakenly had everyone believing that his daughters were called Evil, Idle and Normal.

    Nobody says 'great' here either - it's 'gurt'. 'Gurt' slots in neatly anywhere, even where 'great' wouldn't. 'Bristol City played gurt crap at the weekend, dinnum?' ('Bristol City didn't play very well at the weekend, did they?')

    No one ever 'is' anything, either - they're all 'bist', and the letter 'H' is mostly non-existent. 'E bist down the pub, tellinum all about 'is gurt ideal!'

    I don't know if the film 'Hot Fuzz' ever made it across the Atlantic, but that's just how they speak around here
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim_Carter
    Yeah - Hot Fuzz is here. I'll have to check it out.

    Man this slang could get really confusing.
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    • Profile picture of the author KimW
      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      Yeah - Hot Fuzz is here. I'll have to check it out.

      Man this slang could get really confusing.
      Hot Fuzz was good. Not as good as the zombie movie (the name escapes me at the moment, the bane of getting old ) but it was still a good watch.
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      • Profile picture of the author Phnx
        Originally Posted by KimW View Post

        Hot Fuzz was good. Not as good as the zombie movie (the name escapes me at the moment, the bane of getting old ) but it was still a good watch.
        Shaun Of The Dead! Excellent film. Not got round to watching Hot Fuzz yet.

        Just thought of another word in common usage. I like this one.

        a scrote=a low life, liar, thief, or just a generally no good horrible person. Occasionally used jokingly as in "you little scrote", but mainly has the first meaning.

        The world is run by evil thieving scrotes.

        (It's short for scrotum.)
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  • Profile picture of the author Phnx
    Thought of some more I don't think has popped up here yet...

    gander=look at, as in "let's have a gander" "have a gander at that" etc

    don't/couldn't give a tinkers toss is same as "don't give a flying f**k" (also used without the word 'tinkers')

    gaff is your home "lets go back to my gaff"
    gaffer is the boss, figure in charge.
    graft=work (as in hard work) "that took some graft" "he's a good grafter" "that was hard graft"
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  • Profile picture of the author Li Weng
    interesting one I find is calling a woman "fit", and it mean she's hot.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim_Carter
    I tried to watch Sweeny Todd on Saturday evening.

    I couldn't understand English. Dang I hate that since it is my first language.

    I love British comedies. We get a few here:

    Monty Python
    On the Buses
    Fawlty Towers sometimes.

    And one of my favorite movies - which I couldn't understand what they were saying for the first 30 minutes is Full Monty.
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