IPocalypse ... Now

by whateverpedia 7 replies
Better start snapping up your IP addresses, before they run out.

Less than a year until internet addresses run dry
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  • Profile picture of the author WillBeRich
    I dont think there is much of a problem yet. Wont "they" just try harder to get the IPv6 **** going if it was this critical?
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    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
      Originally Posted by WillBeRich View Post

      I dont think there is much of a problem yet. Wont "they" just try harder to get the IPv6 **** going if it was this critical?
      Actually, there has been a problem for YEARS! The people that say we are going to run out in a year aren't really telling the truth. We basically RAN OUT, and have been RATIONING for YEARS! As for switching to IPv6, it isn't firmware/software compatible! THAT means firmware needs to be updated, routers/switches/etc may have to be replaced, and a lot of software needs to be patched, updated or SCRAPPED!

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

        As for switching to IPv6, it isn't firmware/software compatible!
        This is a PRE-Y2K PROBLEM.

        So give me one good reason why twelve years has not been long enough to upgrade.

        It's not compatible because nobody cares. Why are incompatible products still on the market? Because people buy them. If you gave a damn about your network setup, you used compatible products. If you didn't, guess what? It's your fault.

        Just like all the peripheral manufacturing morons who got the Vista DDK from Microsoft and said "oh, who cares" and tossed it in a corner. Over a year later, Vista came out, and their drivers didn't work anymore. And they all went "we didn't have time!"

        Yes, you did. You just didn't give a crap. So cry me a freakin' river.
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        "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
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        • Profile picture of the author seasoned
          Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

          This is a PRE-Y2K PROBLEM.

          So give me one good reason why twelve years has not been long enough to upgrade.

          It's not compatible because nobody cares. Why are incompatible products still on the market? Because people buy them. If you gave a damn about your network setup, you used compatible products. If you didn't, guess what? It's your fault.

          Just like all the peripheral manufacturing morons who got the Vista DDK from Microsoft and said "oh, who cares" and tossed it in a corner. Over a year later, Vista came out, and their drivers didn't work anymore. And they all went "we didn't have time!"

          Yes, you did. You just didn't give a crap. So cry me a freakin' river.
          Well, if you have a Y2K problem you can just fix your software and *****SATISFACTION******! If you have an IPv6 compatibility problem the best you can do is fix it and wait. The Linux O/S and Later versions of windows ARE IPv6 compatible. HOPEFULLY most home routers are, though I don't seem to recall an IPv6 setting on the wireless numbering scheme of my first router. BUT, PAST THAT? GOOD LUCK!

          BTW the Y2K problem, as presented, was BULL! They did NOT care about space! HOW DO I KNOW? I have seen THOUSANDS of COBOL programs from HUNDREDS of companies, and I know COBOL. They didn't use computational or packed NEARLY as much as they could. HECK, they could have simply treated the flat files like FLAT files, and saved several bytes PER RECORD.

          BTW VISTA was GARBAGE! And I doubt there was a legitimate reason to make ANY drivers incompatible. M/S INTENTIONALLY put a bug in vista to frustrate TAPI! I wonder how many got bitten by THAT! I had at least one program that WAS affected!

          Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author WillBeRich
    Just got a mail from Burst.net - They're rolling out IPv6 now.

    SCRANTON, PA - July 27, 2010 - BurstNET Technologies, Inc.™ , a leading provider of budget hosting services, today announced IPv6 addressing service available end-to-end on its entire product line: including Dedicated Servers, Virtual Private Servers (VPS), & Co-Location.

    IPv6 stands for Internet Protocol version 6. It is the second version of the Internet Protocol to be used generally across the virtual world, with the first version being IPv4. IPv4 is still the protocol of choice for most of the Internet, however, the transition to IPv6 is steadily underway. IPv4 32-bit addresses, due to the growth of the Internet, have become a scarce and valuable commodity. Organizations have gone to great lengths to deal with the shortage and high cost of IPv4 addresses. IPv6 is the future of Internet addressing, because IPv4 is close to running out of available addresses space. With less than a year's worth of Internet addresses left, as industry professionals predicted in July 2010, the call for the technology industry to move faster to adopt the next-generation Internet protocol is growing louder.

    The differences between IPv6 and IPv4 are in five major areas: addressing and routing, security, network address translation, administrative workload, and support for mobile devices. One of the main differences in IPv6, is in the number of addresses available for networked devices. For example, each mobile phone or other kind of electronic device can have its own IPv6 address. The most visible change in IPv6 is that addresses balloon from 32-bits to 128-bits, example: 3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf. IPv4 addresses have 32 bits in them and so allow a maximum of four billion addresses, while IPv6 addresses have 128 bits. With such a huge address space, ISPs will have sufficient IP addresses to allocate enough addresses to every customer, so that every IP device/website has a truly unique address---whether it’s behind a firewall or not.

    BurstNET® is one of the first budget hosting providers to make IPv6 addressing service available end-to-end on its entire product line: including Dedicated Servers, Virtual Private Servers (VPS), & Co-Location. BurstNET® clientele can get a head start configuring their services for IPv6, or just utilize an inexpensive VPS package to just learn how to configure/utilize IPv6 for future needs.
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Well, some others have already upgraded ****THEIR**** networks.

    It doesn't even look like my blackberry is IPv6 compliant. A support forum says that the enterprise solutions DON'T support it. Here is another site:

    BlackBerry Controller cannot start BlackBerry Messaging Agent processes

    VERIZON: Verizon Mandates IPv6 Support for Next-Gen Cell Phones

    The GOOD news is that apparently something happened almost EXACTLY a year ago. Comcast, Verizon, Google, etc... ALL announced that they were working on, releasing beta, or demanding, ipV6 support! Of course, it could STILL take a year or more to fully implement once it gets popular.

    Even burstnet can't REALLY be telling the truth, as some software just won't properly support it yet.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author mkimitch
      There are many estimates for when the allocated IPv4 addresses will be completely exhausted. I prefer the "sooner rather than later" estimates, they seem more exciting.

      Latest estimate puts IPv4 exhaustion at 319 days from now.

      Many ISPs are already buying IPv6 addresses, and apparently the U.S. Government may or may not be running on an IPv6 backbone.

      The Vatican is currently the only "country" that has 100% IPv6 saturation.
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