How Can I Make My PC Live Longer?

66 replies
  • OFF TOPIC
  • |
Okay you tech heads. As all of you know, I am no techie. I hate computers.
And I think they hate me. Personally, I'm sick and tired of, every few years,
having to get a new one because something major went wrong on the one I
have (dead hard drive, FUBAR OS, and so on)

So...what can I do to help extend the life of my PC?

Please list everything you can think of in case I might have missed something.

It will be greatly appreciated.
  • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    Okay you tech heads. As all of you know, I am no techie. I hate computers.
    And I think they hate me. Personally, I'm sick and tired of, every few years,
    having to get a new one because something major went wrong on the one I
    have (dead hard drive, FUBAR OS, and so on)

    So...what can I do to help extend the life of my PC?

    Please list everything you can think of in case I might have missed something.

    It will be greatly appreciated.
    Leave it on.... the most stressful thing in a pc's life is to be rebooted.. well that and get child maintainance demands through the post...



    (don't you just know that some troll is going to post ..get a MAC!
    Signature


    If you are serious about online marketing come and Join our free community The Foundation
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3367696].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by M Thompson View Post

      Leave it on.... the most stressful thing in a pc's life is to be rebooted.. well that and get child maintainance demands through the post...



      (don't you just know that some troll is going to post ..get a MAC!
      You mean it's actually better to leave it running all the time? Won't that
      eventually burn out the power supply sooner?

      Aside from that, there are times when I have no choice but to shut it down
      because things just stop working because the memory has gotten messed
      up and I have problems like Firefox won't restart, or a program keeps
      crashing and so on.

      When that happens, the only solution is to shut it down.

      Unless you can recommend another one.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3367735].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        You mean it's actually better to leave it running all the time? Won't that
        eventually burn out the power supply sooner?

        Aside from that, there are times when I have no choice but to shut it down
        because things just stop working because the memory has gotten messed
        up and I have problems like Firefox won't restart, or a program keeps
        crashing and so on.

        When that happens, the only solution is to shut it down.

        Unless you can recommend another one.

        You can reboot it without problems but try to minimize it, it's the sudden surge of power that kills power supplies, I used to run data center and we had a pet windows 3.1 machine that had been running non stop for over 12 years.

        Also remember that if a psu goes it's better than your HDD, pretty much everything can be replaced but you hdd can't unless you've backed everything up... use mozy or carbonite if you can
        Signature


        If you are serious about online marketing come and Join our free community The Foundation
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3367761].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Adam Roy
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        You mean it's actually better to leave it running all the time? Won't that
        eventually burn out the power supply sooner?

        Aside from that, there are times when I have no choice but to shut it down
        because things just stop working because the memory has gotten messed
        up and I have problems like Firefox won't restart, or a program keeps
        crashing and so on.

        When that happens, the only solution is to shut it down.

        Unless you can recommend another one.
        Honestly man, I don't trust electronics anymore.

        I've gone through 3 computers in the past 2 years, I'm on a brand new Toshiba right now.

        So, I did learn a lesson...

        Buy EXTENDED WARRANTIES! I think I paid...$127 for a full one year extended warranty which INCLUDES accidental, meaning even if I drop it, it's covered. The only thing that's not covered, is submersion. I can also extend the warranty another year, if I do it before this one runs out, which I definitely will.

        May be a simple suggestion but, warranties warranties warranties. They're all going to **** the bed sooner or later so just make sure when it happens, the manufacturer has you covered
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3367776].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        You mean it's actually better to leave it running all the time? Won't that
        eventually burn out the power supply sooner?

        Aside from that, there are times when I have no choice but to shut it down
        because things just stop working because the memory has gotten messed
        up and I have problems like Firefox won't restart, or a program keeps
        crashing and so on.

        When that happens, the only solution is to shut it down.

        Unless you can recommend another one.
        Actually, turning the computer on and off will stress it much more.

        When a computer starts up, the initial power going through the machine acts as a power spike similar to getting hit by lightening...which shortens the lifespan of the computer hardware itself.

        However, leaving it on can shorten the lifespan of the hard drive itself, so it's more like 6 of one, half dozen of another.

        Things that do extend computer lifespan:

        1. Opening the cover, and hitting it with a can of compressed air about every month. Dust layers help retain heat, and dust has been known to conduct electricity. Both are bad for computer life.

        2. Invest in a good UPS (uninterruptable power supply). This does two things for you:

        a. UPS systems have better spike and brownout protection than power strips.

        b. In the event of a blackout, you can do an orderly shutdown of the system, which does extend hard drive life...and keeps your OS from getting borked.

        3. Run MS scandisk on a quarterly basis at a minimum...monthly if you're a hardcore user. This optimizes data on the hard drive.....less time accessing data equals longer hard drive lifespan.

        4. Go down to the local department store, get a very large scarf, and put it over the computer itself. Now you have a halfway decent dust filter...without much interference with airflow. Extremely good idea if you're a smoker.

        5. If you got the money...invest in a raid array. Two drives holding the exact same data (mirroring) are always better than one, even if it runs a little slower as a result. If you need help setting this up, I'll be more than glad to spend a weekend with you on this...just PM me and we can schedule that one for you.

        That's all I got for now. If I come up with any more...I'll be sure to post 'em.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3380737].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author DEaFeYe
        Banned
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3433650].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Tashi Mortier
          Originally Posted by DEaFeYe View Post

          C-Cleaner's automated registry tool fixes that, actually
          I'm sorry I must object. All of those automatic cleaner tools can only remove invalid entries. Doesn't help if the software doesn't remove autostart components or .dlls that still exist on your drive.
          Signature

          Want to read my personal blog? Tashi Mortier

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3433693].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by M Thompson View Post

      Leave it on.... the most stressful thing in a pc's life is to be rebooted.. well that and get child maintainance demands through the post...
      I agree with this ^^

      Having killed off two previous HDs, I was grateful to be given this tip. My oldest PC has been going virtually non stop now for 6 years - I think I've had to switch it off maybe a dozen times in its life.


      Frank
      Signature
      TOP TIP: To browse the forum like a Pro, select "View Classic" from the drop-down menu under your user name.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3368116].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Mike Baker
      Steve, computers are like everything else in life. If buy something and don't learn how to use it before going ahead and turning it on and then having a go at it for not doing what you want it to, is just plain dumb in my opinion. Computers are one of the most complex piece of electronic engineering that we all need to treat it with respect and learn how it works and what can do for us, before getting stuck into it. Just like when you buy a brand new car. You should know how an engine works and what makes the wheels turn for the car to travel from point A to point B, so that you can keep it in tip top condition. If you know how it works, you will know that it needs occasional maintenance. The same goes for computers. They are never going to run in a state like they did when you first brought it home, especially without maintaining it. There are many, many programs out there that can fix and repair common problems that slow down your computer with a press of a few buttons. I highly recommend a program called CCleaner, which is absolutely free and is regularly updated.

      Originally Posted by M Thompson View Post

      Leave it on.... the most stressful thing in a pc's life is to be rebooted.. well that and get child maintainance demands through the post...



      (don't you just know that some troll is going to post ..get a MAC!
      Honestly, that some of the worst advice I have ever heard! It is widely known that leaving your computer on 24/7 gives hackers easier access to your computer, so why would you give them that chance. That's like leaving your house for a few hours without locking any doors. You are opening the door to anyone who wants in.

      If you buy a PC from a retail store the PSU (Power Supply Unit) is of course going to be a cheap model and will burn out a lot quicker than a high end model that has been made to withstand the constant on/off procedures of computers. This is another reason why I always build my own computers. I can pick and choose the best components that I feel are money well spent and are going to last me a good few years.
      Signature

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3379930].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
        Originally Posted by mikescos View Post


        Honestly, that some of the worst advice I have ever heard! It is widely known that leaving your computer on 24/7 gives hackers easier access to your computer, so why would you give them that chance. That's like leaving your house for a few hours without locking any doors. You are opening the door to anyone who wants in.

        Sorry thats just wrong, turning on and off your PC does stress it and does shorten the lifespan.

        If someone has their pc on 24/7 and is not using good quality security then thats just plain idiotic. I spent 3 years running a data center for some of the worlds biggest banks and accountancy companies so I do know what I am talking about.....
        Signature


        If you are serious about online marketing come and Join our free community The Foundation
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3382535].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Mike Baker
          Originally Posted by M Thompson View Post

          Sorry thats just wrong, turning on and off your PC does stress it and does shorten the lifespan.

          If someone has their pc on 24/7 and is not using good quality security then thats just plain idiotic. I spent 3 years running a data center for some of the worlds biggest banks and accountancy companies so I do know what I am talking about.....
          If you read the rest of that post, you will see that I say "If you buy a PC from a retail store the PSU (Power Supply Unit) is of course going to be a cheap model and will burn out a lot quicker than a high end model that has been made to withstand the constant on/off procedures of computers."

          You can either buy a better PSU for the computer which has been built to withstand the constant pressures of being turned on and off, or build it yourself with the ability to choose your own components.

          I never said you can't do it, but for people who aren't in the know with technology it is better for them to turn their PC off when it's not being used to avoid hacking attempts. A huge percentage of computer users will have a basic Firewall and an Anti Virus and will hardly know how to use them, so they rely on them for protection. That is not a good pattern to get into.

          Those of use who know there computers very well, will be safe to leave it on 24/7 and reboot on occasions to clear out RAM, but most computer users aren't that savvy. I always give advise on the idea that the person reading doesn't know their computer as well as you or I.
          Signature

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3385539].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KristofferIM
    Get a Mac! On average they live longer than PC's. The downside is you'll have to use a virtual Windows installation for a lot of the software people use in the IM world.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3367778].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Adam Roy
      Originally Posted by KristofferIM View Post

      Get a Mac! On average they live longer than PC's. The downside is you'll have to use a virtual Windows installation for a lot of the software people use in the IM world.
      You people and your macs...

      PC all the way
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3367780].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
      Originally Posted by KristofferIM View Post

      Get a Mac!

      Told you!!

      Originally Posted by KristofferIM View Post

      On average they live longer than PC's. The downside is you'll have to use a virtual Windows installation for a lot of the software people use in the IM world.
      And you can't upgrade them and Apple will make yours uncool in 12 months

      I've had the same pc for 7 years.....

      ... it's had 2 new processors, 2 new graphics cards, a new mothermoards ...etc <= Joke!!
      Signature


      If you are serious about online marketing come and Join our free community The Foundation
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3367798].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
        Originally Posted by M Thompson View Post

        Told you!!



        And you can't upgrade them and Apple will make yours uncool in 12 months

        I've had the same pc for 7 years.....

        ... it's had 2 new processors, 2 new graphics cards, a new mothermoards ...etc <= Joke!!
        I wouldn't call that being a troll.

        Anyway... I suggest throwing in the towel and just upgrading every few years (Mac or Windows).
        Signature
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3368506].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DJL
    Excess heat is a major killer of electronic components inside your PC. Open the case and carefully vacuum out dust every six months or so. Also, make sure your CPU cooler and all fans are operating correctly.
    As for extended warranties, check out Square Trade. According to feedback on Amazon.com, they are highly recommended.
    Signature

    None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free.
    --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Elective Affinities (1809)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3368135].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author kangen
      I wanted to ask the same question, how to increase my computers life, i have always wondered if my pc can live long ?
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3368422].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TheJolt
    Give it a dust off from time to time, even a small layer of dust will add to the amount of heat being insulated inside the machine, thus making it work harder to cool down.

    Simple things like that can make a big difference
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3368465].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    Okay you tech heads. As all of you know, I am no techie. I hate computers.
    And I think they hate me. Personally, I'm sick and tired of, every few years,
    having to get a new one because something major went wrong on the one I
    have (dead hard drive, FUBAR OS, and so on)

    So...what can I do to help extend the life of my PC?

    Please list everything you can think of in case I might have missed something.

    It will be greatly appreciated.
    Use the Linux OS.
    Signature

    Project HERE.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3368922].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    Steve, I'm not much of a techie either, but I know someone who is. Her name is Elizabeth Boston and she writes a weekly newsletter helping users with all sorts of computer problems. I suggest you write to her. Here's her website: Ask The Computer Lady - Tips & Troubleshooting For Computer Problems. Tell her "Boogie Jack" sent you.
    Signature

    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3369570].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Let's say I just want to shoot my PC and put it out of its misery...

    Can I use my present mouse/keyboard/monitor and external USB devices on 64-bit machines?

    The old stuff is running on 32-bit machine.
    Signature
    Serious about Print on Demand? Discover how YOU can join my FREE exclusive secret alliance
    Plus how to get my Print on Demand Treasure Maps for FREE
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3370323].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
      Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

      Let's say I just want to shoot my PC and put it out of its misery...

      Can I use my present mouse/keyboard/monitor and external USB devices on 64-bit machines?

      The old stuff is running on 32-bit machine.


      Yes you can
      Signature


      If you are serious about online marketing come and Join our free community The Foundation
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3370402].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
      Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

      Let's say I just want to shoot my PC and put it out of its misery...

      Can I use my present mouse/keyboard/monitor and external USB devices on 64-bit machines?

      The old stuff is running on 32-bit machine.
      I just bought a new computer. I had to buy a new keyboard. The old keyboard uses a PS2 port and the new computer didn't have one. I could have bought an adapter, but that was nearly as expensive as a new keyboard. I opted for the new keyboard rather than an adapter for a 10 year old keyboard.

      Just be sure you get one with plenty of USB ports. Nearly everything seems to be USB these days, at least in the models I considered.


      One other point for Steve: I turn my computer on when I get up and off when I go to bed. I've always thought it was good to let them rest a little, but not to turn them on and off multiple times each day. My old computer is 11-12 years old and still going strong. The reason I bought a new one is because I just needed more computing power than it had for making videos. My wife will inherit my old one, which is still good for just about everything else.
      Signature

      Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3370611].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Virtualghost
    You can pick up a PC cheap now not like old days,with flat monitor.My first one old days was 2500.00 one I run on now Acer was 450.00 for the works.But I got to admit my commador 64 was the cheapest one.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3370387].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Chris Hunter
    Steven,

    My God, man! Just buy a new one!

    Even for $1000 a year, you can get a really good desktop PC.

    And you can write it off on your taxes!
    Signature

    Ok, sure. You can follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Chris_Hunter ;)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3370764].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by Chris Hunter View Post

      Steven,

      My God, man! Just buy a new one!

      Even for $1000 a year, you can get a really good desktop PC.

      And you can write it off on your taxes!
      It isn't the jsut the money. I'm more worried about losing licenses to software I paid for, setting up things like Roboform (and probably having to pay for it again), etc.
      Signature
      Serious about Print on Demand? Discover how YOU can join my FREE exclusive secret alliance
      Plus how to get my Print on Demand Treasure Maps for FREE
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3371880].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Chris Hunter
        Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

        It isn't the jsut the money. I'm more worried about losing licenses to software I paid for, setting up things like Roboform (and probably having to pay for it again), etc.
        I understand all of that, Kurt, but the majority of all of that is easily backed up.

        When I buy software, I have all of the files in a specific folder, and I back those folders up. When I do a fresh install, BAM! - it's all there. The EXE, the license, etc.

        That's simply no excuse to me.

        You just can't run the same equipment for years on end. You'll have to either make upgrades or completely replace stuff. It's just the way it is.
        Signature

        Ok, sure. You can follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Chris_Hunter ;)

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3371896].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Kurt
          Originally Posted by Chris Hunter View Post

          I understand all of that, Kurt, but the majority of all of that is easily backed up.

          When I buy software, I have all of the files in a specific folder, and I back those folders up. When I do a fresh install, BAM! - it's all there. The EXE, the license, etc.

          That's simply no excuse to me.

          You just can't run the same equipment for years on end. You'll have to either make upgrades or completely replace stuff. It's just the way it is.
          I have everything backed up. I have image disks as well as "regular" backups. Many apps don't allow the license to be moved.

          And switching from 32 bit to 64 bit isn't "bam" for some of us.

          I didn't post here for a lecture. And I don't need your approval or feel obligated to give you an "excuse".
          Signature
          Serious about Print on Demand? Discover how YOU can join my FREE exclusive secret alliance
          Plus how to get my Print on Demand Treasure Maps for FREE
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3372121].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Chris Hunter
            Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

            I have everything backed up. I have image disks as well as "regular" backups. Many apps don't allow the license to be moved.

            And switching from 32 bit to 64 bit isn't "bam" for some of us.

            I didn't post here for a lecture. And I don't need your approval or feel obligated to give you an "excuse".
            Many apps allow you to use the license one 1 computer. If it's a new computer, you can move the license to it. If that's a problem, it seems to me that it's time to move to a different app without this limitation.

            I have no idea why you're getting so defensive, Kurt. I usually respect most of what you have to say. Maybe you shouldn't participate in discussions that get under your skin so easily because I was in no way attacking you and your smart a$$ remarks aren't required.

            Everything can be moved over and restored from backups or even clones of hard drives, even if you're going from 32 bit to 64 bit.

            Later!
            Signature

            Ok, sure. You can follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Chris_Hunter ;)

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3373705].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
        Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

        It isn't the jsut the money. I'm more worried about losing licenses to software I paid for, setting up things like Roboform (and probably having to pay for it again), etc.
        Kurt,

        can i suggest installing last pass and then importing everythign from roboform. Last pass is encrypted and stored offline you can add all you licences and logins to it then when ever you upgrade you have access to everything.

        I am also certain that roboform has and export/import function.

        I recently upgraded and did a complete fresh install, then added the sofware as and when i needed it ... 4 months on i still haven't needed to install most of the things and i don't miss any. quite a liberating experience actually
        Signature


        If you are serious about online marketing come and Join our free community The Foundation
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3373766].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by Chris Hunter View Post

      Steven,

      My God, man! Just buy a new one!

      Even for $1000 a year, you can get a really good desktop PC.

      And you can write it off on your taxes!
      Has nothing to do with the money. Don't need the hassle of having to
      re-install all the software that I use on a regular basis. It's enough to choke
      a horse.

      Of course, you're more than welcome to come over here and install it for
      me if you like.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3373811].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Chris Hunter
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        Has nothing to do with the money. Don't need the hassle of having to
        re-install all the software that I use on a regular basis. It's enough to choke
        a horse.

        Of course, you're more than welcome to come over here and install it for
        me if you like.
        I would if I could, Steven! LOL!

        Knew it had nothing to do with the money, bro. Just thought you should treat yourself to a new machine for all of your hard work.
        Signature

        Ok, sure. You can follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Chris_Hunter ;)

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3376708].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        Has nothing to do with the money. Don't need the hassle of having to
        re-install all the software that I use on a regular basis. It's enough to choke
        a horse.

        Of course, you're more than welcome to come over here and install it for
        me if you like.
        I'll be in vegas later in the year... ship it over and I'll do it.. suite 303 the Wynn
        Signature


        If you are serious about online marketing come and Join our free community The Foundation
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3377096].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        Has nothing to do with the money. Don't need the hassle of having to
        re-install all the software that I use on a regular basis. It's enough to choke
        a horse.

        Of course, you're more than welcome to come over here and install it for
        me if you like.
        Steve:

        If that is your biggest issue, then just invest in a backup drive and Acronis Migrate Easy.

        Now you can clone the drive to your backup...and when the computer crahes, you can restore from the backup in like an hour.

        Yeah, I got both, and you just reminded me I'm overdue for a backup.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3380771].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
          Originally Posted by Floyd Fisher View Post

          Steve:

          If that is your biggest issue, then just invest in a backup drive and Acronis Migrate Easy.

          Now you can clone the drive to your backup...and when the computer crahes, you can restore from the backup in like an hour.

          Yeah, I got both, and you just reminded me I'm overdue for a backup.
          Floyd, that'll actually reinstall the programs automatically?
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3380787].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Mike Baker
            Originally Posted by Chris Hunter View Post

            Mike, I did "use my head" earlier in the thread if you would have taken the time to actually READ what I said:



            And if you honestly think that doing routine maintenance will keep your PC in "tip top" shape after a few years, you're sorely mistaken. Yes, it will help, but eventually it will wear down, despite all of the maintenance that you do.

            Having a computer is a bill that you should save money to use to replace it every 18 to 24 months. You'll have to replace parts or replace the entire system eventually. They just don't last forever.
            I never said that any kind of maintenance would put the computer back in tip top shape. You may want to read my post again.

            Originally Posted by mikescos View Post

            They are never going to run in a state like they did when you first brought it home, especially without maintaining it. There are many, many programs out there that can fix and repair common problems that slow down your computer with a press of a few buttons.
            Signature

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3380978].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Chris Hunter
              Originally Posted by mikescos View Post

              I never said that any kind of maintenance would put the computer back in tip top shape. You may want to read my post again.
              Consider it reread.

              Later!
              Signature

              Ok, sure. You can follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Chris_Hunter ;)

              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3381015].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Chris Hunter
            Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

            Floyd, that'll actually reinstall the programs automatically?
            Steven,

            If you use a program like Acronis True Image or any other cloning software that you're familiar with (Clonezilla), then yes, the programs will be automatically installing because it creates an exact copy of your current drive and when you copy it over to a new drive, you're all set.

            There may be a few things to sort, but it creates an image of your drive, allowing you to duplicate the image to a new drive and then you're off and running!

            Give it a try.
            Signature

            Ok, sure. You can follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Chris_Hunter ;)

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3381028].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author tamarindcandy
              Reformat and install if you've got OS problems; no need to buy a whole new one.

              Open the case. Take a vacuum cleaner to it.

              Don't buy a computer. Build one! Pick good premium parts, get ones that'll last, get good power supplies, get a huge case with big fans and a lot of ventilation.

              The machine should then last you pretty much as long as you need it to.
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3382483].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
                Originally Posted by tamarindcandy View Post

                Reformat and install if you've got OS problems; no need to buy a whole new one.
                Format C: is for wimps.
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3429609].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
            Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

            Floyd, that'll actually reinstall the programs automatically?

            It's better than that....the whole drive gets backed up.

            In the event of a failure, you can restore the whole shebang in one fell swoop from the backup drive...no reinstall necessary.

            You just gotta remember to do the backup on a regular basis, as Acronis does not do this automatically.

            I use it, I love it, I bought it. Need I say more?
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3429557].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Defunct
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        Has nothing to do with the money. Don't need the hassle of having to
        re-install all the software that I use on a regular basis. It's enough to choke
        a horse.

        Of course, you're more than welcome to come over here and install it for
        me if you like.
        Well once you have reinstalled everything, you can make a ghost copy which is nice and clean, you will need to save it to another HDD, if anything goes wrong, you just copy that across.

        Regular back ups to another HDD helps, like every few days depending on what kind of information you have on your hard drive.

        Or buy a MAC, I don't have one but around 10 friends/business associates converted in the last 5 years and they won't shut up about how awesome it is.

        This includes an ex hacker and owner of a security/anti virus company.

        They don't seem to break or give issues very often.

        Especially good if you are not tech savvy.

        Otherwise you are stuck with backing up your HDD often.

        Also read reviews about the HDD you have in your PC as some big brand names have a pretty high failure rate on some models like the famous Seagate 7200.11, which had some serious firmware issues and was a really popular HDD.

        Otherwise as someone mentioned heat is the next issue.

        Honestly though you would have to post each problem individually for help as there are so many things that can go wrong.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3438643].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Mike Baker
      Originally Posted by Chris Hunter View Post

      Steven,

      My God, man! Just buy a new one!

      Even for $1000 a year, you can get a really good desktop PC.

      And you can write it off on your taxes!
      Another piece of useless advice. Is your car just not working the way it used to when you bought it? Just go and buy a new one then hey?!

      Come on man! Use your head.
      Signature

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3379939].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Chris Hunter
        Originally Posted by mikescos View Post

        Another piece of useless advice. Is your car just not working the way it used to when you bought it? Just go and buy a new one then hey?!

        Come on man! Use your head.
        Mike, I did "use my head" earlier in the thread if you would have taken the time to actually READ what I said:

        You just can't run the same equipment for years on end. You'll have to either make upgrades or completely replace stuff. It's just the way it is.
        And if you honestly think that doing routine maintenance will keep your PC in "tip top" shape after a few years, you're sorely mistaken. Yes, it will help, but eventually it will wear down, despite all of the maintenance that you do.

        Having a computer is a bill that you should save money to use to replace it every 18 to 24 months. You'll have to replace parts or replace the entire system eventually. They just don't last forever.
        Signature

        Ok, sure. You can follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Chris_Hunter ;)

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3380493].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TPFLegionaire
    Hi Steven

    I am a PC gamer, as such have built a few in my time.Here is what I found that you may consider

    -Having the computer "well built" in the first place. When buying the computer, you may want to shy away from the big boxes manufacturers and buy something from a specialist builder. Gaming PC's tend to be built with demanding specs in mind and great care in the choice of components can be a life preserver to your PC.

    -Some people mentioned the effect of switching it on and off as a potential detrimental factor although the jury seems to be out on that one:

    Should You Turn Off Your Computer? - Planet Green
    "turning off PC" = Good/Bad - CNET Desktops Forums

    - I personally would pay attention to the cooling aspect of your PC, again, something that is usually well thought out in a gaming PC. Many motherboard come with temperature monitors and there are a plethora of software utilities to keep an eye on.

    -Dust has been mentioned and I would second that. here are some NSBB (not safe before breakfast) images.Dust of course clog vents and clogged vents make PC overheat.

    Filthy PCs: The X-rated circus of horrors ? The Register

    -Re-install your operating system and software every 12 to 18 months, or at least run "cleaning utilities" on a regular basis (registry cleaner, defragmentation, etc...)

    further readings:

    Reader How Tos: Building For Stability : Introduction
    It's an old article by the basics still hold true.

    Computer Reliability Study Offers Unreliable, Bogus Data | BNET
    Beware of statistics!


    hope this helps
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3372796].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    I just got my new PC today...

    Here's a very useful site:
    Ninite Easy PC Setup - Silent Unattended Install Multiple Programs At Once

    It downloads and installs a bunch of popular freeware programs with a click or two...No need to download, extract and install each seperately.

    One bad thing about having to change PCs is my Utunes account...Now I'm down to only two more PCs (out of 5) under their "fair use". I guess after that I'm out of about $1000 in songs.
    Signature
    Serious about Print on Demand? Discover how YOU can join my FREE exclusive secret alliance
    Plus how to get my Print on Demand Treasure Maps for FREE
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3377704].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ConsumerBoard
    Turn it off when you are not using it.
    Signature

    Review our online complaints or make consumer complaints submission against your dissatisfaction with any service.

    Http://www.independantcomplaints.com/

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3380142].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author silvesterstromae
    My opinion is that the simplest way to make a PC last longer is to buy a new expensive and quality one and then maintain it as good as possible!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3387520].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DR's Fynest
    Couple of things:

    1. If you're going to buy a new one, first think about building your own. Much cheaper and you get to buy quality parts. If you're not a "techie" then ask for advice from a friend. If you're in the states, you can buy everything at newegg.com and they have the most competitive prices. They also have an incredible forum eggxpert.com. You can sign up, go to this forum and tell people what you want the computer for. They'll come up with some of the best advice within your alloted budget.

    2. If you're not yet buying a new one, the first thing I'd suggest is to give it maintenance every month:
    a) Get a program such as CCleaner and run it every so often (I run it on mine 2 times per month) - this should delete a lot of the files that are just taking up space in your HDD. It also cleans your registry for unneeded files or corrupt ones.

    b) Defrag your hard drive every so often as well. I do mine once a month. This might be overkill for most regular people but I use my PC a LOT so I just like to keep it running as smooth as possible.

    c) Clean it up a few times a year. This is very important imo. I live in a place that attracts a lot of dust. I open up my PC and vacuum it and clean out the fans about 3-4 times a year.

    d) As suggested above, no need to constantly shut it off if you're going to use it again in a few hours. I've let mine run non-stop for as long as 2 weeks only needing to restart due to an update or a new software install requiring it.

    e) If your concern is the power supply dying faster, these you can buy for very cheap with great quality (newegg.com). My original one is still going strong after 2 and a half years. It only cost me about $80.

    All said an done, the best route is ensuring you're using quality parts. I built mine myself and I had never done that. I used to have your same issue with my previous Dell and Compaq machines. I did some research and learned how to build it myself and I can tell you I will NEVER buy retail again. Much more bang for your buck.

    Hope these tips help ya out some.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3420947].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mobilemassage
    Avoid downloading from untrusted website, Use Licensed Antivirus to Secure data and PC. The main reason of crashing of Hard disk is virus. So try to use best antivirus like avira, norton, nod32 or escan.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3420968].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author cjenks222
      dont download porn
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3429418].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Tashi Mortier
        Okay I want to add a few hints, too:

        Try using a free Virtual Machine to test new software. Deinstalling software always leaves remnants on your computer and so it's best if they are only in the virtual machine.

        I'd recommend Virtual Box, because it's free. It's basically just another virtual computer running inside your computer.

        Also if you want your computer to live as long as possible, don't turn it off. The most stressful part for hard drives is when they have to go from 0 RPM to 7200 RPM at boot time. That's why most hard drives run smoothly for years and crash when you turn them on.

        Another problem with turning the computer on and off is that there are a LOT of capacitors inside your computer. If your computer has a good airflow they get to a certain operating temperature and stay there. Now as every other material their metal expands when they get warmer and contracts again when they cool down. That is a major mechanical stress for them. Capacitors are one of the most failing non-mechanical part in your computer.

        I assembled my computer myself though I wouldn't recommend this to everybody, it takes time and experience, better go to a PC store and tell them to only use quality parts and pay some money so they assemble it for you. I have no no-name part in my computer and I refuse to buy a cheap PSU for anyone because the last time I did that damn thing gave a power surge to the whole PC turning it into a brick.
        Signature

        Want to read my personal blog? Tashi Mortier

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3433328].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    Actually, forget Acronis too. A few years back someone on this forum pointed me to this:
    Windows backup, disaster recovery and drive image software

    which they explained is the technology Acronis ises in their product.
    I yhink Acronis might be a bit esaier for the less technical inclined, but ShadowProtecthas the HIR (Hardware Independent Restore) technology. With this you can take the image you make and put in on a new machine. While I do own version 3 of this product,I have not had the need or opportunity to actually try this feature. But if it does what it is suppose to then its pretty amazing.
    Signature

    Read A Post.
    Subscribe to a Newsletter
    KimWinfrey.Com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3430776].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author John Henderson
    Doesn't making an identical clone of a fragmented, slow-running Windoze installation kind of miss the point here? :confused:

    The solution to Steven's problem seems to involve combining a fresh re-install of Windows with apps that have already been installed.

    Could the OS and the apps be put onto separate drives, so that a format/OS install on the primary drive wouldn't affect the apps that Steven doesn't want to laboriously reinstate?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3431559].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
      Originally Posted by John Henderson View Post

      Doesn't making an identical clone of a fragmented, slow-running Windoze installation kind of miss the point here? :confused:

      The solution to Steven's problem seems to involve combining a fresh re-install of Windows with apps that have already been installed.

      Could the OS and the apps be put onto separate drives, so that a format/OS install on the primary drive wouldn't affect the apps that Steven doesn't want to laboriously reinstate?
      The object is to have a backup for restore purposes in case the hard drive takes a dive. Fragmentation is a non issue in any case as that is easily resolved via Windows defrag too, which can be done after a restore if necessary.

      Even if you put the apps on a separate drive from the OS, it does not help at all...because now if either drive dies, the apps will need to be fully reinstalled (too technical to explain here).

      I looked at that shadow protect, and it appears to be total overkill for what Steve needs as that thing is for whole networks...not a single computer.

      If you don't like messing with hardware, you could do similar with an online service such as carbonite or mozy...but those do come with a monthly fee for storage. Just something to keep in mind is all.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3435531].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mahal788
    Buy Cyberdefender by MyCleanPC. My laptop was terminal until i purchased it. Now its running smoothly and faster than ever.
    Signature

    Success is the sum of small efforts, repeated day in and day out.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3431961].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Lloyd Buchinski
      Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

      One other point for Steve: I turn my computer on when I get up and off when I go to bed. I've always thought it was good to let them rest a little, but not to turn them on and off multiple times each day.
      I turn mine off at least each night also. The hard drive is a mechanical part and does have simple mechanical things go wrong with it. The less miles you put on it, the newer it is. Starting a car engine might be one of the worse things you can do to it, but not many people leave it running 24/7/365 because of that.

      If you do leave it on constantly you will also get a lot more air blown through it with the cooling fans. That draws the dust into your puter.

      Besides that, most desktops take about 350 watts to run them. Not many people would leave that much power going for no point at all. I don't like wasting anything and that is a clear waste. The 'live longer if you leave them on' is dubious.

      I doubt if it makes a lot of difference either way for the life of the computer. It is amazing to me how well and how long they run. One that we use to control hvac systems for a building complex has been on for 14 years now. We're planning on replacing it soon, (better safe than sorry ) but there is a lot involved because the control systems for the building are unique and the program controlling them has to be rewritten.

      On the other hand I've personally heard a hd scraping when I used to work for a city that left them on 24/7. Of course they can fail either way, if they are left on, or if you turn them off and on.

      Originally Posted by TPFLegionaire View Post

      great care in the choice of components can be a life preserver to your PC.
      Enjoyed your links, thanks. For choice of components, try clicking around lenovo.com. They sell quite a range of computers, but at least from the mid price range up, you can pick out the options you want. I have an absolutely beautiful machine because of that.

      Originally Posted by Chris Hunter View Post

      Many apps allow you to use the license one 1 computer.
      I don't buy much software but unfortunately products from companies like Incansoft cannot be moved from one computer to another, even if you use an image of the hd. It is one computer only, not one computer at a time.
      Signature

      Do something spectacular; be fulfilled. Then you can be your own hero. Prem Rawat

      The KimW WSO

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3433088].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author KimW
      Originally Posted by mahal788 View Post

      Buy Cyberdefender by MyCleanPC. My laptop was terminal until i purchased it. Now its running smoothly and faster than ever.
      WORST-ADVICE-EVER.
      Signature

      Read A Post.
      Subscribe to a Newsletter
      KimWinfrey.Com

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3441658].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DEaFeYe
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3433668].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author tamarindcandy
      Originally Posted by DEaFeYe View Post

      Oh yeah, and one more general tip to make your PC life last much longer.

      Stop. Illegal. File. Sharing. Period.

      Because the only thing you can guarantee about what you're downloading is that you have no idea what you're actually downloading
      Sorry, but on that you're deathly wrong. The smart pirate has a perfectly good idea of what they're downloading; moderated trackers weed out infected files and nuke the defective torrent. This is plain FUD.

      Originally Posted by DEaFeYe View Post

      For most systems this is pretty bad as the #1 cause of most hardware failures is heat. Unless you have a top notch cooling system, which most non-"techies" don't, time shut down is time where the hardware is at a temperature that it likes to be at.
      Wrong again. The real damage of shutting down/booting up is PC components expanding and contracting; if you leave 'em on forever, they stay stable. Not to mention, most systems--especially in standby mode--don't exactly run that hot; we're talking around 35C idling, and 42C or so when on but not under load. What do you do, leave Crysis on 24/7?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3434346].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author DEaFeYe
        Banned
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3434489].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author tamarindcandy
          Right... so you're going to sit there and tell me that when you fire up cracked programs, which are a modified executable of a legitimate program, that you know 100% what all the modifications do? Or we can talk about keygen programs, which again, could be running any sort of process. And it's not delusional fear. The Trojan Horse is still by far the most common tactic for spreading viruses and malware.
          That's why you have some sort of firewalls/virus scanners etc. But even apart from that, you don't seem to really "get" the mindset of crackers. They break DRMs et al for the challenge; they aren't generally interested in infecting a random schmuck's home PC (and work PCs should't let you download illegal files, anyway).

          Besides, your argument is completely flawed and contradictory. Expansion and contraction would occur due to changes in heat, which you argue is the issue, but then go on to state that the 7C differential is negligible. Ducy?
          Sure, because when completely off a PC would be under room temperature. Let's say, what, 20C? Going from 20C -> 40C is quite a difference, and considerably greater than waking a PC up from standby. If you're worried about power consumption, that's a completely different thing.

          Since it's a fact that idling PCs don't run all that hot, unless your office is baking under an extreme summer, how do you figure the heat is going to be the problem? What temperature did you imagine an idling PC ran at?
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3435199].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author 0ldfart
    I repair PC's for a living: Laptops and Desktops

    Here's my take on it.

    1. Dont faff about with an old PC. It will cost more money to maintain and you run the risk of something dying at any moment. If this is a 'work' PC you then have the cost of repair plus the downtime and associated costs & hassles. Honestly, you are asking for problems using anything more than 2-3 years old

    2. Dont use XP. I know there are a lot of fan boys/girls out there who love this OS (myself included), but it is not a secure operating system. What that means is that its full of security holes that make it vulnerable to malware and hacks. There's plenty of downtime/repair potential here. If you're using it, its time to ditch it. Its a dinosaur.

    3. Run a machine with enough RAM. When you dont have enough physical memory in your machine, it will use the hard disk to 'swap' the memory out. This slows the machine, but in maintenance terms, it makes the hard disk work very hard and will increase the speed at which it will fail. Enough RAM => 2GB XP, 4GB Vista/7

    4. Keep Windows, Adobe products and Java up to date on your machine. Use MSupdate to ensure windows is automatically updated when the patches come out. If you see a prompt to update Java, Flash, or Adobe Reader - update them. These apps are full of security holes (thats the reason they are patched so regularly). This will help to protect your machine from harm online.

    5. deleted

    6. Dont open file attachments from people you dont know.

    7. Use an up-to-date, reliable AV system. Microsoft Security Essentials is a good free option. Kaspersky is very good if you want paid. Malwarebytes is a very good investment in addition to either of these.

    8. Agree with all of the above posts about dust and heat. Not sure if its been mentioned, but make sure nothing is obscuring the vents on the machine. Side vents will sit flush against desk cabinets, reducing air-flow. Make sure all the vents are clear. If using a vacuum cleaner to dust out a PC (shudder), make sure the nozzle does not come into contact with components. Vacuum cleaners discharge static electricity, which can harm components. Best practice is a pure-bristle brush (not nylon) and a can of compressed air (from an electronics shop)

    With Laptops, absolutely keep them clear of dirt and dust. Make sure when they are running, the fan vents are not obscured - best idea is to use a tray or a hard surface underneath them. Running a laptop on a bed with it perched on top of your quilt is not a good idea. Avoid using a laptop in a dusty environment - their heatsinks are susceptable to getting blocked with debris and the associated overheating can be an expensive repair.

    9. Make backups, regularly. Back up your operating system using something like Paragon Free. If something goes wrong, just connect the machine to the disk with the image on, boot to cd, and restore everything.

    For documents, photos, business files, etc (critical personal information) make sure you have an automated backup system in place - an external hard disk that is always plugged in is ideal. karens Replicator is a good program for this purpose.

    Also consider an online backup system like Mozy. If you google 'mozy promotion code' or similar, this service can be had for about $6 per month. What it does is take all your critical data and automatically back it up online to a storage could. If you have a theft or a fire or an act of god or whatever that destroys your local data, its just a matter of making the insurance claim, buying a new machine, then downloading all your files once you're online.

    10. Consider using Firefox with the following addons as your primary browser-
    Adblock Plus
    Mcafee siteadvisor
    WOT
    -- some AVs (like AVG) will have a similar solution to siteadvisor or WOT but a second opinion is never a bad thing.

    11. Don't log in as Admin. Admin accounts are not designed for everyday computing. When you are online using an admin account your machine is a lot more vulunerable. You can remove 90% of this vulnerability by using a limited 'user' account for day-to-day computing, and using 'run as admin' to do any necessary software installs or machine maintenance.

    12. If you want to minimise maintenance costs, use a tower pc rather than a laptop. Laptops are really best for portable computing, because when they break they can be very expensive to fix. Desktops are more 'modular' - if something goes wrong its cheaper just to swap out the broken part. The parts are a lot cheaper, and they are easier to fit - making the repairs on them a lot more affordable.

    Hope it helps

    Jim
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3433751].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    " looked at that shadow protect, and it appears to be total overkill for what Steve needs as that thing is for whole networks...not a single computer"

    Then you didn't look at the correct one. Thdre is ShadowProtect for the home user and for network use. Of course my whole point of mentioning it was that you said get Acronis, and my point was why get something liecensed from someone when you could get the orginal. That being said,ShoadowProtect might be overkill for the casual user,even the home version.
    Signature

    Read A Post.
    Subscribe to a Newsletter
    KimWinfrey.Com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3436136].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rick B
    While there are many things that can cause you to lose a computer, in my experience the two main causes are virus infections and a crashed hard drive.

    To prevent viruses and/or make them easier to remove:
    1. Don't use Internet Explorer as your browser. I recommend Google Chrome or Firefox.
    2. Make sure that your firewall is enabled.
    3. Use active antivirus protection. If you don't want to pay for it use AdAware Free.
    4. Create recovery disks if your computer didn't come with them.
    5. Create system restore points regularly.
    6. Run Windows updates regularly.
    7. Don't download anything you're not sure is virus free. Type the name of the software and the word "reply" at Google to find forum threads about that software from people who have downloaded it. Free stuff and porn are the most virus laden items.

    If your hard drive crashes and you have made recovery disks, it's relatively easy to replace the hard drive and reload the software that originally came with your computer. A crashed hard drive usually makes a "click ... click ... click" noise that comes from the hard drive.

    I know that stuff might sound a bit overwhelming to some but most of it is not that hard once you've done it once. Otherwise your alternative is to hire someone to do it for you or just buy new computers regularly.

    Good Luck!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3437117].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tony Tikos
    Install antivirus and spyware software programs. You can choose a commercial product like Norton's Anti-Virus and spyware suite, or a free antivirus solution like Avast! Antivirus. Note that Avast is only free for home use. Options for free spyware software include Windows Defender, Ad-Aware and Spybot Search and Destroy. Keeping these software programs up to date creates a protective shield for your computer that keeps your computer humming along happily without viruses that can clog up the works and make it run slowly or even destroy files.

    Protect electrical components. Put all your computer components on a UPS (uninterruptible power supply) that has a strong surge protector to prevent shorting out delicate computer components. Some power companies offer rental services for whole house UPS systems that will protect all your household electrical components.
    Clean and protect your computer from dust. Even in the cleanest environment, computers can develop dust buildup. Shut off your computer and disconnect it from the power supply. Gently wipe down the outside of your computer, especially around the fan. Occasionally clean the inside of your computer as well. If you are uncomfortable with doing this cleaning yourself, find a computer technician to provide a proper cleaning.

    Run routine diagnostics. Schedule routine disk defragmentation and disk cleanup processes. These tools are usually found in system tools under accessories. Whenever your computer seems sluggish, these are the first tools you should use.
    Uninstall unused software programs. Legitimate software programs and web surfing can lead to a build up of unnecessary software programs that bog down your computer. Routinely review the programs on your computer and remove any programs that you don't need. This frees up storage space on your computer and makes it run smoother.

    Add RAM. If you find your computer is not up to speed after maintenance and uninstalling programs, increase the RAM on your computer. This low cost investment can add useful life to your computer. Consider upgrading to at least 1 gigabyte of RAM, or more if you have memory slots available. Crucial.com offers a scanner tool that lets you know your current memory and your upgrade options.

    Add extra storage. If digital pictures and videos are eating up your available hard drive space, add an external storage device or new hard drive. By shifting these items off your primary hard drive, you free up sace that can allow your computer to run faster. After you copy your files to a new location, delete them from your hard drive and then run disk cleanup and a system defragmentation. This step should make your computer last longer and keep money in your pocket.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[3438545].message }}

Trending Topics