Americans: University student or a college student?

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I have a question for the American warriors here,
which way do you call your University/college student?

When I watch American TV series, I remember they
call them college students. When I read books
regarding to business, they also call them college degree.

But Stanford is called a University rather than
Stanford College.

So which one is correct? Or do you use both?
  • Profile picture of the author ButterflyGarden
    Most people use "college student" regardless if the student attends a University or a College.
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Schenk
    Yes, we use either college student or university student interchangably eventhough college and university are not the same thing.

    A university is a school with more than one college in it - college of arts and music, college of medicine, college of law, college of science.

    For example, a college usually concentrates in one area of study. There used to be a small arts and music college in Cincinnati, called Edgecliff College. Eventually it was purchased by Xavier University and became the Arts and Music College of Xavier University.

    :-Don
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  • Profile picture of the author Markus Mar
    Thanks Don, fantastic explanation, I would've clicked on Thanks twice if I could
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  • Profile picture of the author adeleadams
    Don very well explained there. Thanks a heaps for that
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  • Profile picture of the author John Henderson
    In the UK, students working for their first degree are called "under-graduates" whereas those who are working for a masters or a PhD are called "post-graduates".

    However, I've heard Americans use the term "graduate student" -- is this what Brits would call a "post-graduate"? :confused:
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    • Profile picture of the author byronhbrown
      To help you clear that confusion I will be putting the following definition for College and University:

      College - educational institution or a constituent part of an educational institution. Usage varies in English-speaking nations. A college may be a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, an institution within a federal university, an institution offering vocational education, or a secondary school.

      University - an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects. A university is a corporation that provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education.
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    • Profile picture of the author Sarah S
      Originally Posted by John Henderson View Post

      In the UK, students working for their first degree are called "under-graduates" whereas those who are working for a masters or a PhD are called "post-graduates".

      However, I've heard Americans use the term "graduate student" -- is this what Brits would call a "post-graduate"? :confused:
      Yes, graduate students are those who are continuing their education after having already obtained their undergraduate degree.
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      • Profile picture of the author McGruff
        College Student, University Student, Politically Indoctrinated...they all work
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        • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
          Whilst we are at it, I have just finished a John Grisham novel.

          What is a co-ed?

          Dan
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          • Profile picture of the author Markus Mar
            Originally Posted by jimbo13 View Post

            Whilst we are at it, I have just finished a John Grisham novel.

            What is a co-ed?

            Dan
            Co-ed is short for coeducation,
            means it's a school that's open to both sexes.
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  • Profile picture of the author Meonthe
    Originally Posted by Markus Mar View Post

    I have a question for the American warriors here,
    which way do you call your University/college student?

    When I watch American TV series, I remember they
    call them college students. When I read books
    regarding to business, they also call them college degree.

    But Stanford is called a University rather than
    Stanford College.

    So which one is correct? Or do you use both?
    I think it's a good idea to quote a few lines from a publication of EducationUSA:

    "Degree-granting institutions in the United States can
    be called by any of these terms, and colleges and institutes
    are in no way inferior to universities. As a general
    rule, colleges tend to be smaller and usually offer only
    undergraduate degrees, while a university also offers graduate
    degrees."
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  • Profile picture of the author kjblitz
    College Students...that's what they call us...
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  • Profile picture of the author Sunfyre7896
    I agree. Most people use the term "college." I know that most colleges are actually called the University of, or (x) University, but there are plenty like Boston College that go by "College." I think it's just that people got used to saying that since it's easier. People do say that "he got his degree from a university," though. In the general sense, I believe it's easier to say college, and in a more in depth way, you can say university if applicable.
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