Over and over I see this, why?

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I just read another post where the $ sign was placed after the number, al a 29$. Doesn't everyone know it should be $29? Does any country place their symbol for money following the number? I don't know of any, but then I have never looked.

This always drives me crazy. I know it is a short drive, but you would think that people that are making, or trying to make money using words, they would try to use them right. I see numerous WSO's etc that have the dollar symbol follow the number.

I was terrible in English in school. But since I grew older I try my best to do it right. I am sure I mess things up from time to time, maybe often. But I make sure I use their instead of there where appropriate, and other small items like that.

Sorry if I am being picayune. I know a lot of members are from other countries. But if they are working in the English language, you would think they would try to learn the basics. Words are the tools of our business, right?
  • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
    Does any country place their symbol for money following the number?
    Yes.

    Especially, countries where they do NOT have an internationally recognized/used symbol, just and abbreviation for their currency. That always goes AFTER the numbers. For people coming from such places the English way looks like "awkward"

    But you are right: if the sales letter is targeting English speakers - we should learn their way...
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

      Especially, countries where they do NOT have an internationally recognized/used symbol, just and abbreviation for their currency. That always goes AFTER the numbers. For people coming from such places the English way looks like "awkward"

      You know, it is like the competition between Microsoft and Apple.

      They both have operating systems that do basically the same thing.

      Apple has a "trash can" (?), and Microsoft has a "recycle bin". LOL

      Why the difference?

      Well, Corporate America loves to sue the competition, so they have to name their stuff differently. :rolleyes:

      Could you imagine the lawsuit, when Apple sues Microsoft over a "trash can"? LOL

      Apple Lawyers: "Judge. We believe that Microsoft should pay us royalties for using the term 'trash can' in its operating system."

      Judge: "I just received papers from Rubbermaid. They are filing a suit against Apple for trying to trademark Rubbermaid's primary product."

      Microsoft Lawyers: "Judge. We motion that you dismiss this case on the basis that the Rubbermaid vs. Apple lawsuit will take precedent over this case."


      As a child, I had always wondered why Americans put the dollar sign in front of the number, because after all, when we say $29, we say, "29 dollars".

      And they say we Okies are backwards. LOL
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      • Profile picture of the author joekoffi
        Originally Posted by tpw View Post

        when we say $29, we say, "29 dollars".
        That's as funny as PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor
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        • Profile picture of the author ThomM
          Originally Posted by joekoffi View Post

          That's as funny as PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor
          Actually PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page when it was created by Rasmus Lerdorf in 1995
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          • Profile picture of the author joekoffi
            Originally Posted by ThomM View Post

            Actually PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page when it was created by Rasmus Lerdorf in 1995
            Yes, you are right but that name is almost lost. I don't know the story behind the change but...
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    • Profile picture of the author JROC777
      Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

      Yes.

      Especially, countries where they do NOT have an internationally recognized/used symbol, just and abbreviation for their currency. That always goes AFTER the numbers. For people coming from such places the English way looks like "awkward"

      But you are right: if the sales letter is targeting English speakers - we should learn their way...

      Ah interesting I didnt know this but have noticed it from time to time as well. Who says you can't learn something new eveyday.
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  • Profile picture of the author alyssaamelia
    You're correct. I've noticed it from time to time as well, but I generally ignore it. If you are indeed targeting English speaking clients, then you should ensure that you know the basics.
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    And just to add to the confusion, the symbols for lower denominations are usually placed after the number e.g. 45ยข , 35p etc.

    But seriously, Tim -

    Originally Posted by timpears View Post

    This always drives me crazy.
    If you're really that sensitive, I wonder how you work up the courage to get out of bed each day.


    Frank
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    • Profile picture of the author timpears
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      If you're really that sensitive, I wonder how you work up the courage to get out of bed each day.
      I am a very sensitive guy.:p

      It is tough to get out of bed each day. Old age and health problems have a way of catching up with a fellow. But I seem to manage, so far.

      I know this was pretty petty. But I am glad I asked the question. I never thought I would get so many responses. But I learned something from it. So it was worth while, to me at least.

      Thanks everyone for your input.
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      Tim Pears

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  • Profile picture of the author Thomas
    Originally Posted by timpears View Post

    I just read another post where the $ sign was placed after the number, al a 29$. Doesn't everyone know it should be $29? Does any country place their symbol for money following the number? I don't know of any, but then I have never looked.
    Lots of countries do, Tim (including, I believe, parts of Canada).

    And, IIRC, more than 30 different currencies use the $ symbol too, so there's unlikely to be ANY international consistency with that symbol.

    Even within the SAME currency, it can vary widely. With the Euro, for example, the € symbol universally goes before the amount in Ireland and (I think) the Netherlands (like €100.50). Virtually everywhere else, it goes after (100,50€) and, in some countries, it even goes like this: 100€50. (Note the different usage of "," in place of "." too; another point of confusion for lots of peope!).

    Originally Posted by timpears View Post

    ...you would think that people that are making, or trying to make money using words, they would try to use them right.

    But if they are working in the English language, you would think they would try to learn the basics.
    Maybe YOUR way is wrong?

    In this case, I'm pretty sure "the basics", as you're thinking of them, are correct in a small number of countries (like the US, the UK, Ireland, Australia, etc.), but there are at least 120 countries where, though it may be the official (or the de facto official) language, English is still in very significant usage, encompassing, according to some estimates, as much as 2 billion people.

    To many of them, the American "way" looks weird and wrong.
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    • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
      Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

      To many of them, the American "way" looks weird and wrong.
      And we didn't even mention the really wrong (American) way of writing the dates!

      The "normal" way is either
      yy/mm/dd
      or
      dd/mm/yy

      It's a logical decreasing/increasing order of the units.

      But mm/dd/yy... complete nonsense for everybody else but Americans, LOL
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      • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
        Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

        And we didn't even mention the really wrong (American) way of writing the dates!

        The "normal" way is either
        yy/mm/dd
        or
        dd/mm/yy

        It's a logical decreasing/increasing order of the units.

        But mm/dd/yy... complete nonsense for everybody else but Americans, LOL
        I've been using the yyyymmdd form for years.

        I also use military (24-hour) time.

        Makes organization easier. Plus, it also helps discourage people from using my computer. ("What time is 16:35?") LOL.
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      • Profile picture of the author pdrs
        Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

        And we didn't even mention the really wrong (American) way of writing the dates!

        The "normal" way is either
        yy/mm/dd
        or
        dd/mm/yy

        It's a logical decreasing/increasing order of the units.

        But mm/dd/yy... complete nonsense for everybody else but Americans, LOL
        Not total nonsense - if you say a date outloud you usually say August Fifteenth, Nineteen Eighty Four (for example) - so: 08/15/1984 or mm/dd/yyyy

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        • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
          Originally Posted by pdrs View Post

          Not total nonsense - if you say a date outloud you usually say August Fifteenth, Nineteen Eighty Four (for example) - so: 08/15/1984 or mm/dd/yyyy

          i only use day month year, it is part of my culture so needs to be preserved

          it would be disrespectful to change

          bill gates has a lot to answer for
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          • Profile picture of the author seasoned
            Originally Posted by oncewerewarriors View Post

            i only use day month year, it is part of my culture so needs to be preserved

            it would be disrespectful to change

            bill gates has a lot to answer for
            For wahtever reason:

            Japanese yyyy.mm.dd
            Europe: dd/mm/yyyy
            US : mm/dd/yyyy

            It WOULD be nice if europe and the US made it clear which they used! What about a date like 1/12/2011? Is that last january, or next december?

            Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author timpears
        Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

        And we didn't even mention the really wrong (American) way of writing the dates!

        The "normal" way is either
        yy/mm/dd
        or
        dd/mm/yy

        It's a logical decreasing/increasing order of the units.

        But mm/dd/yy... complete nonsense for everybody else but Americans, LOL
        Yes, in the forty odd years I have lived in the USA, I have never understood that one. They should be in order of hierarchy. The USA way of doing it doesn't make sense. But I have learned to do it that way after all these years.
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        Tim Pears

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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

          And we didn't even mention the really wrong (American) way of writing the dates!

          The "normal" way is either
          yy/mm/dd
          or
          dd/mm/yy

          It's a logical decreasing/increasing order of the units.

          But mm/dd/yy... complete nonsense for everybody else but Americans, LOL
          This is one reason I've adopted military dating for most purposes, especially on checks, etc. where the date may become important data.

          For example, I'm writing this September 28, 2011. I would write the date as 28Sept2011.

          With handwriting barely above chicken scratch, I've also add a dash '-' across the letter Z and the numeral 7 to avoid confusion with 2 and 1. 0 gets a '/', O does not.

          TMI?
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      • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
        Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

        And we didn't even mention the really wrong (American) way of writing the dates!

        The "normal" way is either
        yy/mm/dd
        or
        dd/mm/yy

        It's a logical decreasing/increasing order of the units.

        But mm/dd/yy... complete nonsense for everybody else but Americans, LOL
        Looks wrong to you, right to us. Just like driving on the "wrong" side in the UK but they think we drive on the "wrong" side.

        I grew up in Latin America but I've been in the US for over 20 years so I'm use to it now.
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        • Profile picture of the author timpears
          Originally Posted by Alan Petersen View Post

          Looks wrong to you, right to us. Just like driving on the "wrong" side in the UK but they think we drive on the "wrong" side.
          I was in The Bahamas a while back, and they drive on the left like we do in the UK (where I am from). But they mostly drive cars built in the states, so it is like driving a postal delivery vehicle with the wrong side drive. Pretty weird if you ask me. But it seems to work for them. Although when my taxi driver has to move out so far to see if he can pass, that can be a little frightening.
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          Tim Pears

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      • Profile picture of the author mywebwork
        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

        If you're really that sensitive, I wonder how you work up the courage to get out of bed each day.
        LOL, love it! The global economy is collapsing, war in the middle east, natural disasters and THIS is what you worry about? Great comment Frank!

        Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

        Lots of countries do, Tim (including, I believe, parts of Canada).
        Correct, in Quebec this is quite common, probably due to the large European influence here.

        Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

        And we didn't even mention the really wrong (American) way of writing the dates!

        The "normal" way is either
        yy/mm/dd
        or
        dd/mm/yy

        It's a logical decreasing/increasing order of the units.

        But mm/dd/yy... complete nonsense for everybody else but Americans, LOL
        Love it again! This has always confused me, especially in Canada where we tend to use both methods. I often try putting a number higher than 12 into a field just to make sure I'm not entering the day into the month field. The US method makes no sense whatsoever.

        A lot of great comments on this thread!

        Bill
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        • Profile picture of the author Charlotte Jay
          Originally Posted by mywebwork View Post




          Love it again! This has always confused me, especially in Canada where we tend to use both methods. I often try putting a number higher than 12 into a field just to make sure I'm not entering the day into the month field. The US method makes no sense whatsoever.

          A lot of great comments on this thread!

          Bill
          Americans not making sense? Whodda thunkit?
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        • Profile picture of the author ameerulislam10
          Originally Posted by mywebwork View Post

          LOL, love it! The global economy is collapsing, war in the middle east, natural disasters and THIS is what you worry about? Great comment Frank!



          Correct, in Quebec this is quite common, probably due to the large European influence here.



          Love it again! This has always confused me, especially in Canada where we tend to use both methods. I often try putting a number higher than 12 into a field just to make sure I'm not entering the day into the month field. The US method makes no sense whatsoever.

          A lot of great comments on this thread!

          Bill
          For this reason sometimes I feel like spelling the month (29-Sep-2011). No one would get confused with that.
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  • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
    We can make it even worse. In many (most) European and South American countries it is customary to use a comma rather than a . in writing monetary sums. $3.73 becomes 3,75$.
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    • Profile picture of the author Harvey Segal
      I agree it's strange.

      That's my cents two.


      .
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    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
      Originally Posted by mikemcmillan View Post

      We can make it even worse. In many (most) European and South American countries it is customary to use a comma rather than a . in writing monetary sums. $3.73 becomes 3,75$.
      NO, it is WORSE than that! They SWITCH them! So 1.000.000,00!

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Charlotte Jay
    It only takes about a fraction of a second for my brain to figure that out, so it doesn't really bother me.

    Writing dates gets confusing sometimes. I've been in the US for almost 16 years, but every now and then I will write dd/mm/yy and get periodic moments of panic when driving on the right hand side of the road :O
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Baker
    I think most people will use there own common sense and understand that whether the dollar sign is at the beginning or the end of the amount they will know it is the common sign for dollar. I don't think anyone else here would ever find that hard to understand.
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    "Common sense is very uncommon." -- Horace Greeley
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael D Forbes
    Is the right hand actually the left hand in the southern hemisphere? They can't get the sun to ride in the correct part of the sky down there either.
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  • Profile picture of the author powerstrike
    sometimes it's a typo error as I believe $ before the amount is a worldwide standard
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  • Profile picture of the author RHert
    What can I say, I was born in America and I still can't get the mm/dd/yy thing. I always have to ask someone which comes first.
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  • Profile picture of the author philipf
    I've read once that if the article you are reading has typographical/grammatical errors, it denotes that the article or the writer is not true in what they are saying.
    for example, if the article is used to sell a product, it is more likely that the product is ineffective/flawed/scam.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Baker
    Typically most English based websites will use the American version. But yeah it can be quite confusing for those of us who implement either of the other two on a day to day basis.
    Perhaps HTML 6 should have some code in it to determine which country the user is from and display the calendar version for that specific region.
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Originally Posted by timpears View Post

    I just read another post where the $ sign was placed after the number, al a 29$. Doesn't everyone know it should be $29? Does any country place their symbol for money following the number? I don't know of any, but then I have never looked.

    This always drives me crazy. I know it is a short drive, but you would think that people that are making, or trying to make money using words, they would try to use them right. I see numerous WSO's etc that have the dollar symbol follow the number.

    I was terrible in English in school. But since I grew older I try my best to do it right. I am sure I mess things up from time to time, maybe often. But I make sure I use their instead of there where appropriate, and other small items like that.

    Sorry if I am being picayune. I know a lot of members are from other countries. But if they are working in the English language, you would think they would try to learn the basics. Words are the tools of our business, right?
    Well, for US dollars, at least on the internet, I try to say $12.34USD And the $ prefix is NOT an american syntax, it has to do with it being dollars. Canada, Ausralia, etc... do the SAME thing!

    Steve
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