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I have to admit that I have no clue about a lot of spelling and grammar principles. People learning English as a second language usually know more about it than I do. Most of the time, when they ask me questions about English grammar, I don't know the answer and make something up, "Passive what? No. It is better to make your stand than let others push you around."

The history of spelling and grammar is pretty funny. It used to be totally random until certain forms became widely adopted after authorities arbitrarily imposed them.
  • Profile picture of the author DianaHeuser
    Thunderbird,

    I have a real problem with the way people write the words "your" and "you're" on the forum. Very few people get it right, in my humble opinion of course.

    "It's your book" compared to "You're responsible".

    "You're" means "You are" and "Your" means it belongs to you.

    Ok. I am so glad I got that off my chest. I feel so much better now.

    Di
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    • Profile picture of the author sanhal
      Originally Posted by DianaHeuser View Post

      Thunderbird,

      I have a real problem with the way people write the words "your" and "you're" on the forum. Very few people get it right, in my humble opinion of course.

      "It's your book" compared to "You're responsible".

      "You're" means "You are" and "Your" means it belongs to you.

      Ok. I am so glad I got that off my chest. I feel so much better now.

      Di
      Yes, you're so right Di. I always thought that using "your" instead of "you're" was an American thing. I see it all the time and not only on the forum.

      Sandy
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      • Profile picture of the author DianaHeuser
        Originally Posted by sanhal View Post

        Yes, you're so right Di. I always thought that using "your" instead of "you're" was an American thing. I see it all the time and not only on the forum.

        Sandy
        Thanks Sandy

        I must admit that I felt a bit like Lynn Truss, of the "Eats, Shoots and Leaves" fame, while I was writing that. She classed herself as an apostrophe vigilante complete with balaclava and black marker pen.

        Sad to say, I was very keen to join her cause

        Di
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      • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
        Originally Posted by sanhal View Post

        Yes, you're so right Di. I always thought that using "your" instead of "you're" was an American thing. I see it all the time and not only on the forum.

        Sandy

        That's funny if you think that's bad. Have you been subjected textglish and "ur" yet? how about peeple who not only spell rong butjumblewordsandsentencestogether?
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    • Profile picture of the author JBorhez
      Originally Posted by DianaHeuser View Post

      Thunderbird,

      I have a real problem with the way people write the words "your" and "you're" on the forum. Very few people get it right, in my humble opinion of course.

      "It's your book" compared to "You're responsible".

      "You're" means "You are" and "Your" means it belongs to you.

      Ok. I am so glad I got that off my chest. I feel so much better now.

      Di
      Yes, your right.

      I also have a problem with the incorrect use of "to" and "too."

      I bet you do to.

      :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    The history of spelling and grammar is pretty funny. It used to be totally random until certain forms became widely adopted after authorities arbitrarily imposed them.
    No, not really. People will develop standard forms because language is instinctual and standard forms are necessary for communication. The printing press helped to standardize some things such as spelling because written language is not instinctual so it was exposure to written language that standardized spelling. However - when writing started, it was the standard form of the language that was being depicted by the written symbol because standard forms will always take precedence over localized colloquialisms, etc. If that weren't the truth, we'd never understand anything.

    When in school we learn proscriptive rules to keep language standard. While learning these "rules" we are actually learning descriptive rules, but attempting to reinforce them prescriptively to keep language from evolving too rapidly - which it can do in times of social upheaval. It also teaches the lower classes to speak on a level with higher classes to avoid class discrimination.
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    Sal
    When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
    Beyond the Path

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  • Profile picture of the author LarryC
    While you should learn the rules of grammar, especially if you create content online (as I do), it's inevitable that they will become increasingly flexible. There are several reasons for this:

    1) Globalization -as on the Warrior Forum, people from all over the world who speak different languages must communicate. You also have the different usages within languages (e.g. English -UK, America, Australia, etc.) -so which way is "right?"

    2) Popularity of abbreviations when texting, tweeting, etc. Younger people in particular don't have the patience for formal rules of grammar.

    3) The overall decline of text as a way to convey information vs. images and video.

    Again, grammar still counts, but it will never count the way it once did. I'm not saying this is good or bad, just the way it is.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    Language is always evolving, Larry. Grammar is important in many aspects. We subconsciously make many notes about people because of their grammar. Those who use non-standard or just incorrect grammar are seen as being inferior in social rank or intelligence. (That's in English - in some countries if you step outside of your class's grammar, you can be seen as extremely offensive as well.)

    Whatever changes you see going on now will become stable parts of the language later - and even standard. For example "ain't" was at one time standard language which later evolved out of standard speech and now when used marks it's user as having poor education or low social stature. To those in a geographic location where people use it as their standard speech, those who frown on it are seen as pompous outsiders who may experience mistrust from that sector.
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    Sal
    When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
    Beyond the Path

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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    I always like it when threads like this pop up because I get to swoop in and say things like, every body shood right like me bee cause eye right more betterer than ewe. Annie one can sea who kin right the gooderest a round hear.

    Yeah, okay, so I'm easily amused. You got something against making your own fun?
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    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

      <snip>
      Yeah, okay, so I'm easily amused. You got something against making your own fun?
      I make my own fun all the time. If you only hear one person laughing in a room full of people, it's probably me laughing at my own jokes.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
        Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post

        I make my own fun all the time. If you only hear one person laughing in a room full of people, it's probably me laughing at my own jokes.
        Then you're my kind of people, no matter what kind of lines Sal writes for us!
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    I am a writer and a skilled proofreader and editor, despite only having one functioning eye. I find bad spelling and grammar extremely annoying because to me it says the person doesn't care enough about their work to check it.
    Lots of people don't even use spell check!
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    • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
      Originally Posted by laurencewins View Post

      I am a writer and a skilled proofreader and editor, despite only having one functioning eye. I find bad spelling and grammar extremely annoying because to me it says the person doesn't care enough about their work to check it.
      Lots of people don't even use spell check!
      but why are so many spell checks in usa, for wont of a better word, english?
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Connell
      Originally Posted by laurencewins View Post

      ...Lots of people don't even use spell check!
      But look what happens when you rely too heavily on spell check...

      Tip: read it out loud.

      Spell Checker
      Eye halve a spelling chequer
      It came with my pea sea
      It plainly marques four mu revue
      Miss steaks eye kin knot sea

      Eye strike a quay and type a word
      And weight four it to say
      Weather eye am wrong oar write
      Is shows me strait a weigh

      As soon as a mist ache is maid
      It nose bee fore two long
      And eye can put the error rite
      It’s rare lea ever wrong

      Eye have two run this poem threw it
      Eye am shore yore pleased two no
      It’s letter perfect awl the weigh
      My chequer tolled me sew
      “Anon”
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      • Profile picture of the author Gayla
        I've been writing in some capacity for over 13 years now. I found developing my online personality around my Southern accent. It has helped in the times when I wasn't quite certain of proper punctuation or grammar use. If I thought too much on a certain statement I'd simply choose an alternative.

        Using my 'online Southern accent' is all fine and good in most cases, but there are those times when I needed to clean up my act a bit more and write a professional letter, update my resume and LinkedIn. In fact, it was the updating my LinkedIn the last time that had me searching for a grammar and punctuation tool that was actually qualified to get the job done. That's when I found Grammarly.com. I love it! In fact, I loved it so much, I have been granted permission to give away a handful of free memberships.

        The memberships are around $40 per quarter and $95 a year. If you're interested in a free membership send me a private message and we can go from there.

        These are review memberships and naturally they're giving them out to help spread the word about their service, but I'm sure you'll find it to be one of those services you want to share.

        It's perfect for students writing essays or academic papers - professionals writing memos, proposals and even emails - those learning English - authors, writers, bloggers and even job applicants or the unemployed looking to improve their resume and write quality cover letters.

        Cheers
        Gayla
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        • Profile picture of the author Magnus Koenig
          Yeah, we better make sure of our spelling and grammar especially when posting articles, our resume, and other reports on our LinkedIn profile. Potential clients and partners might see it and get turned off if they'd see that we have incurred misspellings and grammatical errors.
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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by Karen Connell View Post

        But look what happens when you rely too heavily on spell check...

        Tip: read it out loud.

        Spell Checker
        Eye halve a spelling chequer
        It came with my pea sea
        It plainly marques four mu revue
        Miss steaks eye kin knot sea

        Eye strike a quay and type a word
        And weight four it to say
        Weather eye am wrong oar write
        Is shows me strait a weigh

        As soon as a mist ache is maid
        It nose bee fore two long
        And eye can put the error rite
        It’s rare lea ever wrong

        Eye have two run this poem threw it
        Eye am shore yore pleased two no
        It’s letter perfect awl the weigh
        My chequer tolled me sew
        “Anon”
        WOW! Talk about the telephone game! I KNOW it is a mistake, but HOW can a mist ache? And two nos can be pleased by yore? What about the PRESENT? Does it depress them? Why would presents depress anyone?

        Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author asahi123
    usually english language is second language,obvisouly problems will come when we communicate. reading newspaper helps to solve your problems to correct your grammer.
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    People who claim to be good at spelling and grammar and English is their first language also have problems with spelling and grammar.
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  • Profile picture of the author roseca
    most of the people have problem in English, some are good in speaking and some of the people having bad written English.no one is perfect but its in our hand to improve our self by practicing.
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  • Profile picture of the author carlpond
    English is not my first language, but my communication skills has been developed in my college years and up till now. Learning English the right way I mean correct and proper English is hard, but as time passes by, I'm getting the hang of it.
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  • Profile picture of the author zdorian
    it's pointless to watch for grammar on the internet
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post

    The history of spelling and grammar is pretty funny. It used to be totally random until certain forms became widely adopted after authorities arbitrarily imposed them.
    I doubt that. Latin script is a relatively new invention, and most languages probably spelled phonetically, FOR THAT LANGUAGE. English is often said to be bad in that respect, but it has a LOT of loan words. ALSO, oddly, English is like the only language that REALLY has TH! The german word, "theater", for example, could JUST as easily be spelled "teater". It is pronounced like "tay-ahter". Maybe theater is a loan word from english. So TH usually sounds like T, unless it is in ENGLISH.

    And there ARE odd things, like replacing U with V, and misunderstandings, like replacing an etsett(sp?) with a B. NEEDED things, like replacing it with ss, or replacing a ringed a with AA.

    AARHUS is NOT spelled AARHUS, but how could I spell it CORRECTLY here? OK, OK, there IS a multikey entry, but I forget that. 8-(

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    Originally Posted by vlcm View Post

    I think using its, it's and their, they're, and there correctly is a must. It bugs me when people get those wrong.
    How about to, too, and two? Or flair and flare? Or except and accept? Or right and write? Or more and moor? Or plate and plait? Or break and brake? Or blue and blew? Or threw and through? Or toe and tow? Or dew and do? Or you and ewe and u? Or wood and would? Or slough and slew?
    Or pane and pain? Or...



    Aw, I'm just messin' with ya.
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    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

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  • Profile picture of the author dagaul101
    Grammar changes over time, a few years ago, some of the Internet lingo would have been scoffed at by purists, and I am certain in a few hundred years, most of the slangs might be unrecognisable to us
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    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
      Originally Posted by dagaul101 View Post

      Grammar changes over time, a few years ago, some of the Internet lingo would have been scoffed at by purists, and I am certain in a few hundred years, most of the slangs might be unrecognisable to us
      Zuaibtr?

      That is an "english" sentence that one day may be uttered in the absence of any grammar/spelling.

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author chrislangley
    It's fascinating looking at history when something becomes popular there is always an authority that crops up to demand certain standards, we can see that happening with the Internet, the government are all about regulating it for their own tax benefits
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    • Profile picture of the author MaxxC
      With the popularity of modern forms of person to person communication - like text messaging-, I can understand why some people have 'modified' the language due to limited time and space available to them, on their devices.
      I refer here to corruptions, or shortcuts, like :
      ur = your / you're
      gr8 = great
      cre8 = create
      b4 = before

      I do not agree, support or encourage this, but I can live with these shortcuts, when they're used for private communication between peers.
      I also admit and expect that misspellings/typos e.g. "thier" for "their" will occur.

      However, when any text is reasonably expected to be exposed to public scrutiny, like bulletpoints of a sales letter, calls to action, I expect the author would at least preview it before publishing.

      Here's an example, if someone writes "thier" when they should write "they're",
      that would be too erroneous to be labelled as either typo or mispelling.
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