Texas: The vote to oust SOPA posterboy Lamar Smith is tomorrow.

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SOPA changes name to CISPA

The latest attempt by Congress to try to regulate and control the Internet is no longer known as SOPA but CISPA: the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act. The SOPA-like bill would give companies the power to collect information on their subscribers and hand it over to the government and all they have to do is request it.

Texas info on voting locations 5/29/12:
Texas Redditors: The vote to oust SOPA posterboy Lamar Smith is tomorrow. GO VOTE, his opponents need your support! : politics
  • Profile picture of the author DaisySibyl
    I am curios if this will have a future. ACTA and SOPA were stopped. Now this? Yeah, right. Will they ever stop with this? Piracy cannot be stopped IMO.
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  • CISPA: Bill Text and list of supporting companies (including Facebook's letter of support)

    CISPA: The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act Heads For The Hill « TechFleece
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  • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
    The Congress really are Hollywood's Luddite bitches.
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  • Profile picture of the author raymol
    yeah, great. this means there will be a lot of protest than SOPA. when they will stop budging with this internet rules things?
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    That's the fun of it raymol - they aren't going to stop. Say what you want to say now - because a few years from now, we'll all have a list of subjects we are allowed to talk about - and another list of attitudes we're allowed to have about the things on the list. Anything else will mean persecution/prosecution.
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    • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
      Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

      we'll all have a list of subjects we are allowed to talk about - and another list of attitudes we're allowed to have about the things on the list. Anything else will mean persecution/prosecution.
      Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that what the Patriot Act did?
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      • Profile picture of the author HeySal
        Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

        Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that what the Patriot Act did?
        LOL - I was just thinking of that one:

        Patriot act due to expire so gov admin asks behind closed doors to have domestic clauses added to it - it gets passed, people are freaking because that is our habeas corpus and posse comentatus - so Admin swears he will veto it. It gets to his desk in a form of a nazi nightmare from hell - and he passes it.

        CISPA -
        Rinse and Repeat.

        I vote Ecuador:
        Better get your money out NOW. They've already made it legal to strip you of everything you own if you decide to leave.
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        Sal
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  • I'm thinking maybe they should at least come up with a catchier acronym...

    Like the Congressional Rape of Adult Privacy Act - CRAPA
    The bill didn't work disguised as 'piracy', try again. It didn't work as 'child protection', try again. So now they want to try it as 'terrorist security' - what's next?
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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by MoneyMagnetMagnate View Post

      I'm thinking maybe they should at least come up with a catchier acronym...

      Like the Congressional Rape of Adult Privacy Act - CRAPA
      The bill didn't work disguised as 'piracy', try again. It didn't work as 'child protection', try again. So now they want to try it as 'terrorist security' - what's next?
      Hopefully, what's next is that these Hollywood-licking fools will be voted out of office.
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      • Profile picture of the author Enfusia
        And we were gifted with apposing thumbs for this?

        What happened to the land of the free?

        Always remember: If you give up your liberties for security you will one day wake with neither.

        This is control disguised as ? Pick a flavor of the day.

        Patrick
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      • Profile picture of the author THK
        Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post

        Hopefully, what's next is that these Hollywood-licking fools will be voted out of office.
        You seriously believe there will be a government that would not be "Hollywood licking" or money sucking for that matter?
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        • Profile picture of the author Kay King
          Does anyone seriously believe there will NOT be more regulation of business online in the future?

          Currently, IMers seem to follow Wikileaks and Anonymous in their opinions of any proposed legislation - and I think that is self defeating in the end.

          Public sentiment will change as the scams and theft online continue to increase as they have in recent years. It's that change that is motivating large businesses to back some of this legislation.

          IMers need to keep a finger on the pulse of their customers instead of following leaders who may not have business interests in mind.

          Smart big online businesses are participating in crafting proposed bills because they've recognized just saying "no" is not going to work. IMers have to evaluate each law proposed from a business point of view - and I don't see that happening now.

          There is a difference between protecting personal privacy and providing transparency in business conducted online. At some point in the future, IMers who focus on their own "personal rights" will lose out to concern for the safety of consumers.

          I think before long there will be a change in the general IM attitude toward regulation as more people running honest small businesses online decide it's smarter to support well written laws than to argue against every bill.

          Don't know if this bill is well written or not - haven't read it yet. But I doubt many complaining about it have read it either.

          kay
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          • Profile picture of the author Kay King
            "there was a time when we could say what we wanted (within reason)
            But "within reason" is widely interpreted.

            There was a time when you could sell magic potions and snake oil offline to consumers and claim your potion cured every disease. Regulations were added when consumer complaints grew.

            That's part of what we are seeing online. The idea of "safety" is one consumers will buy into.
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            Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world will change forever for that one dog.

            I wish offended people would react like fainting goats and quietly tip over.
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  • Where TPP Goes Beyond ACTA -- And How It Shows Us The Future Of IP Enforcement | Techdirt

    ACTA and TPP have much in common. That's no coincidence, since they are both born of a common desire to move away from multilateral forums like WIPO that are relatively open to scrutiny, to invitation-only groups negotiating behind closed doors. That lack of transparency has allowed all kinds of extreme measures to be proposed without any countervailing arguments being heard about why they are neither fair nor sensible.
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    Well....10 years time we'll look back and say to ur children.."there was a time when we could say what we wanted (within reason) before the regulations told us what to say and think"

    Big companies/politicains rule and we simply follow.
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      Originally Posted by sloanjim View Post

      Big companies/politicains rule and we simply follow.
      we've allowed that to happen. We voted for the politicians.
      We allowed "big" government and big corps to take over.

      I don't think we should not have done that. I believe we should have less government, not more.

      but I'm probably the minority. I don't expect government to fix everything that is wrong. I have a brain, free will , and a conscience, and don't follow blindly just because.

      Too many people follow blindly.

      Too many people don't ask questions.

      Too many people are apathetic and don't care as long as their own needs are met.

      and that is why we have bloated governments and big corps, running the show.

      And it will never change, unless we change.
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  • Profile picture of the author l@ttemonarck
    I think they just revised their act to CISPA and the content of that SOPA bill
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  • Interesting...I thought I would toss this in for comment - what do you think?
    Think he can do it?

    This Internet provider pledges to put your privacy first. Always. | Privacy Inc. - CNET News
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

    I sure am glad the the bureaucrats are too stupid to make it work, aren't you?

    I am soooo pleased that a loose-knit group of kids can pretty much bring down any site they please.

    I don't think the bureaucrats understood the ramifications of letting the technology genie out of the bottle.

    The internet is an extension of humankind's intelligence. I don't think they have the wherewithal to police it.
    They do it just fine in some socialist countries, why does everyone assume it can't be done here, too?

    I have nothing against businesses wanting to protect their property.

    I have EVERYTHING against using that excuse to lie to me and persecute me for what I say and believe.

    My allegiance is to the US Constitution and a constitutionally run government -- not corporate interest.



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    Sal
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  • A anti-incumbent SuperPAC is considering targeting Lamar Smith this election cycle - let's convince them to do it. Contact info is at the bottom of the press release -
    Campaign for Primary Accountability - Texas Watchdog: Houston Super PAC Aims to Defeat Texas Congressmen
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  • Revealed: CISPA -- Internet Spying Law -- Pushed by For-Profit Spy Lobby

    Defense industry contractors are lobbying for the cyber security bill in Congress that would expand the government's ability to access information about online activity.

    Revealed: CISPA -- Internet Spying Law -- Pushed by For-Profit Spy Lobby | Civil Liberties | AlterNet
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    I'm hoping that Oregon is in line with voting no. I'm glad that they are p.o.ed at the feds right now. Federal gov tried to grab (read:steal) a whole crapload of land in OR and OR has just decided they aren't going to shut it down, fed wishes or not. There are a lot of states getting p.o.ed at the feds right now - especially since it was revealed we are not acting as a sovereign nation anymore. I'm thinking states are getting ready to turn them off. The power grab has gotten to be absolutely nightmarish.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      Sal - I think people in many states would agree with you...but doubt it will happen.

      States now rely on the fed govt for aid in so many ways - they administer federal programs...have countless aid and support for road and bridges and every little project their minds can think of.

      Only a handful of states (and oregon might be one) would be willing or able to give up all of the handouts in order "do things our way". Sad, but true.
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      Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world will change forever for that one dog.

      I wish offended people would react like fainting goats and quietly tip over.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    Kay - right now there are 28 states that are ammendment 10 conscious. The federal dole is the only hold they have any longer. People and state governments are completely fed up and severely angry. Several states are now working on ways to cut the fed without disturbing their own economy. I'm thinking those states might start working on trade agreements between themselves and just let the rest get sucked under the federal bus.

    I'm hoping they get it sussed out real fast at any rate. We need to turn the fed off as fast as possible.
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    Sal
    When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
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  • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
    Time for a reboot?

    The White House on Wednesday shocked lawmakers and advocacy groups by announcing that President Obama would veto a proposed national cybersecurity bill known as CISPA if it reaches his desk in its current form.


    More...


    White House Veto Threat Scrambles CISPA’s Prospects | TPM Idea Lab
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    • Profile picture of the author TDogger
      Originally Posted by TLTheLiberator View Post

      The White House on Wednesday shocked lawmakers and advocacy groups by announcing that President Obama would veto a proposed national cybersecurity bill known as CISPA if it reaches his desk in its current form.
      Are you talking about the same president that has a long history of saying one thing in public, but doing something else behind the scenes? Isn't this the same guy who vehemently opposed almost all of Bush's policies, yet is still using them under his administration?
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      • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
        Originally Posted by TDogger View Post

        Are you talking about the same president that has a long history of saying one thing in public, but doing something else behind the scenes?

        Isn't this the same guy who vehemently opposed almost all of Bush's policies, yet is still using them under his administration?


        What Bush policies are you talking about?


        If you notice, he's certainly not promoting the Bush/GOP 'economic' agenda.


        He wanted to close down G-Bay but congress - from both sides of the isle, would not allow it.

        Some of Bush's foreign policy positions are OK.


        I'm talking about someone in the middle of an election year.


        To say the least...

        It would not be helpful to his reelection efforts if he signed anything remotely connected to that bill - in any form.


        TL
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        "It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. -- Mark Twain

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  • Why You Should Care About and Defend Your Privacy

    Why You Should Care About and Defend Your Privacy
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  • House OKs CISPA cybersecurity bill despite veto threat

    House OKs CISPA cybersecurity bill despite veto threat - Technology & science - Security - msnbc.com

    Gee...that didn't take long...a couple of hours to decide?
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    I saw the thread title and was going to post that I just got an email saying the house passed it.
    It's up to the senate to stop this.
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    • Originally Posted by KimW View Post

      I saw the thread title and was going to post that I just got an email saying the house passed it.
      It's up to the senate to stop this.
      That, and try to make the Whitehouse look like the bad guys by trying to 'endanger our national security' by 'supporting cyber-terrorism' with a veto...

      or whatever spin they'll put on the ball...it's in their court...


      I feel like a song cue...:rolleyes:
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  • House passes CISPA bill - Keith Perine and Jennifer Martinez - POLITICO.com

    The final tally was 248-168, enough to pass the measure but not enough to override the threatened veto. Forty-two Democrats broke with the White House to vote for the bill, and 28 Republicans voted against it.

    FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 192
    http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2012/roll192.xml
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  • Profile picture of the author Big Rob
    Hmmm.

    To Canada, where they make Molson, Boars Head meats and legal weed?

    Have to adjust to the cold and learn how to say "Ay?" and "Aboot"

    Or to Ecuador, Cheap housing, american dollars and cheaper domestic help?

    Have to learn spanish, live in the mountains, and never try Pizza Huts Crown crust.

    Hmmm. Much to Ponder
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    • House Fast-Tracks CISPA Vote, Passes it with Horrible New Amendments

      House Fast-Tracks CISPA Vote, Passes it with Horrible New Amendments | GamePolitics

      Pushing the bill through at mach 10 is bad enough, but what's worse are the amendments that Rep. Ben Quayle (R - AZ) managed to get added. These amendments make CISPA infinitely worse than it already was. Here is what TechDirt says the amendments add to CISPA:
      Previously, CISPA allowed the government to use information for "cybersecurity" or "national security" purposes. Those purposes have not been limited or removed. Instead, three more valid uses have been added: investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals, and protection of children. Cybersecurity crime is defined as any crime involving network disruption or hacking, plus any violation of the CFAA.

      Basically this means CISPA can no longer be called a cybersecurity bill at all. The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a "cybersecurity crime". Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all. Moreover, the government could do whatever it wants with the data as long as it can claim that someone was in danger of bodily harm, or that children were somehow threatened—again, notwithstanding absolutely any other law that would normally limit the government's power.
      The Electronic Frontier Foundation has a lengthy write-up on the other amendments that made it into CISPA here. https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/0...veillance-bill

      Finally, if you want to stop this bill, visit the ECA's Action Page to send your elected representatives a letter strongly expressing your opposition to CISPA. http://action.theeca.com/p/dia/actio...ction_KEY=5863

      Ultimately this is a setback for opponents of CISPA, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the this bill will make it to law. In order for it to pass it has to make it through the Senate, and then the President has to sign it into law. The White House has already promised to veto CISPA. Let's see if they keep their word.
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    • Profile picture of the author TimPhelan
      Originally Posted by Big Rob View Post


      Or to Ecuador, Cheap housing, american dollars and cheaper domestic help?

      Have to learn spanish, live in the mountains, and never try Pizza Huts Crown crust.

      Hmmm. Much to Ponder
      I vote Ecuador:

      The Best Place to Retire Overseas on a Budget - Yahoo! Finance
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  • Profile picture of the author flowbee77
    ughh, I hate politicians. I should run for office but then again, I would probably hate myself as soon as I got elected.
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  • https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/04/security-99

    April 25, 2012 | By Dan Auerbach
    Security for the 99%

    The House of Representatives kicked off their “cybersecurity week” yesterday with a hearing titled "America Is Under Cyber Attack: Why Urgent Action is Needed." Needless to say, the rhetoric of fear was in full force. A lot of topics were raised by members of Congress and panelists, but perhaps the most troublesome theme came from panelist and Former Executive Assistant Director of the FBI Shawn Henry, who repeatedly urged that good cybersecurity means going on the offensive:
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  • CISPA Is Ridiculously Hideous (And It Just Passed The House)

    Total surveillance of the people is what Congress ultimately wants, so it is no surprise that this is apparently a top legislative priority for them -- even at a time when 1 out of every 2 recent college graduates face unemployment. Even at a time when our total public debt is above $15 trillion.

    CISPA Is Ridiculously Hideous (And It Just Passed The House) - Business Insider


    How bad is CISPA in its current form? Here's some analysis from Techdirt: "Up until this afternoon, the final vote on CISPA was supposed to be tomorrow. Then, abruptly, it was moved up today—and the House voted in favor of its passage with a vote of 248-168. But that's not even the worst part. [...] Previously, CISPA allowed the government to use information for 'cybersecurity' or 'national security' purposes. Those purposes have not been limited or removed. Instead, three more valid uses have been added: investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals, and protection of children. Cybersecurity crime is defined as any crime involving network disruption or hacking, plus any violation of the CFAA."

    Let's put this into perspective for you:

    - If the government suspects you are a genuine "bad guy," like a cyberterrorist, human trafficker, drug kingpin, etc... they can already seize all of this online activity information about you. It's called obtaining a warrant. CISPA does away with that. It supercedes ALL existing federal privacy laws. As Techdirt's Leigh Beadon put it, "Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all. Moreover, the government could do whatever it wants with the data as long as it can claim that someone was in danger of bodily harm, or that children were somehow threatened—again, notwithstanding absolutely any other law that would normally limit the government's power."

    - Online banking and trading: dead as we know it. Who is going to use online banking services, knowing that anyone from a local police department snoop, to a federal spy agency, to even random private companies might be watching your every trade, and your purchase history, without a warrant or court involvement of ANY kind.

    - The 'adult entertainment' industry: dead as we know it. Big Brother is watching you. If CISPA becomes law, which it appears on the fast-track to do, who will watch knowing that others are watching you.

    - Online health databases and discussion forums such as WebMD: dead as we know it. Who will ask intimate health questions, knowing that your identity is not even semi-anonymous any more?

    - Online suicide helplines, depression forums, political discussion communities: dead as we know it. Same reason as above.

    - Legitimate criticism of the government: dead as we know it, especially if you are a "job seeker" who doesn't want any blemishes on your record to get in the way of surviving.

    - Online communities like Reddit: dead as we know it. So much for the semi-anonymous, crowdsourced hivemind brilliance of multi-million user social communities.

    - Facebook: dead as we know it (although they don't seem to care). Who will use the service, knowing that countless other companies could be watching and logging every profile and photo you view, every message you send or receive, and every connection you've ever made...

    Again, allow me to stress the fact that CISPA enables snooping without a warrant or court involvement. It is absolutely ludicrous insanity. The minds behind this in Congress should be forced to resign, immediately -- they are acting in the interests of weird lobbying groups and defense contractors. They aren't acting in the interests of Internet users, the economy, nor even the health of the Internet itself.

    For those hoping President Obama will wave his veto pen and make this nightmare go away: remain vigilant. He also issued a veto threat on NDAA, and then reversed that, signing it into law on New Year's Eve with almost no media attention given to it. This President, and all future Presidents, now have the ability to order the U.S. military to imprison American citizens, without trial nor access to an attorney.
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  • Microsoft backs away from CISPA support, citing privacy

    Microsoft has been counted as a supporter of CISPA since the beginning. Now the company tells CNET any new law must allow "us to honor the privacy and security promises we make to our customers" and protect "consumer privacy."

    Microsoft backs away from CISPA support, citing privacy | Security and Privacy - CNET News
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  • Ben Franklin would say our online liberty is the same as liberty itself

    Summary: It's a fine line to walk. Rather than great thinkers like Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin, we're stuck with the 112th U.S. Congress.

    Ben Franklin would say our online liberty is the same as liberty itself | ZDNet
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    • Posted: 2 May 2012
      Right now, the Avaaz website is under massive attack.

      An expert is telling us that an attack this large is likely coming from a government or large corporation, with massive, simultaneous and sophisticated assaults from across the world to take down our site.

      We were expecting this. Our people-powered campaigning has been fearless, and we've taken on the world's worst actors head-on, in ways that genuinely hurt them - from the Syrian and Chinese regimes to Rupert Murdoch, Big Oil and organized crime. The Syrian dictatorship called our campaigner 'the most dangerous man in the world', and a UK inquiry recently revealed emails between Murdoch's news corporation and top levels of government saying the Avaaz campaign against Murdoch was their biggest concern. Many wondered when these people would come after us.

      And it's begun. We have urgent campaigns on oceans, forests and Syria we need to run, but the attack has been going on for 36 hours straight, threatening our ability to keep campaigning. Because of top-notch security, our site is still up, but it's not enough. We need to show these actors that when they attack Avaaz, they're messing with people. And people-power can't be intimidated or silenced, it only grows stronger. Use the tool to the right to donate to an Avaaz defence fund to take our security to the next level, and show our attackers that whatever they throw at us only makes us stronger.

      *note: I am only relaying information - this is not a solictation for donations. That is entirely your decision.

      http://www.avaaz.org/en/index.php
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        Every post about an attack comes from the Avaaz site - which is up and running fine...and, by the way, needs donations.

        The only "expert" saying it's "likely a govt or big corp" - is Avaaz. Ya think?

        Five posts in a row about it? Clearly there isn't the outcry you are hoping for here.
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        • Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

          Every post about an attack comes from the Avaaz site - which is up and running fine...and, by the way, needs donations.

          The only "expert" saying it's "likely a govt or big corp" - is Avaaz. Ya think?

          Five posts in a row about it? Clearly there isn't the outcry you are hoping for here.
          I'm not sure I'm quite following the "five posts in a row" - the only time I have posted a link regarding Avaaz is #27 which is a link to a stop CISPA petition. Avaaz has a lot of protest causes other than that they petition for. For me, I did note I wasn't condoning donations, only relaying that they say they are under attack, for what or by whom was undetermined when I looked at their site...

          I put the info in here, because the CISPA petition was the only connection I had to Avaaz as a link. There is no indication it has anything to do with that cause directly...if that was inferred, sorry for any misunderstanding...
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          • Profile picture of the author Kay King
            I undestand - but when I looked what I see is that every claim of an "attack" leads directly back to Avaaz claiming "an attack". I saw multiple references that "an expert" said "it must be govt or big corp attacking"....but the "expert" seems to be from Avaaz. I find it a bit suspicious - but that's just me.

            The number of posts is not important and I shouldn't have mentioned it. Seems you are very intent on CISPA (and I understand that) but it's not the popular cause SOPA was.

            The dyslexia of public opinion - it flows on quickly to the next cause and can only sustain outrage for a limited time. Sad, but true.
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            Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world will change forever for that one dog.

            I wish offended people would react like fainting goats and quietly tip over.
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            • Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

              I undestand - but when I looked what I see is that every claim of an "attack" leads directly back to Avaaz claiming "an attack". I saw multiple references that "an expert" said "it must be govt or big corp attacking"....but the "expert" seems to be from Avaaz. I find it a bit suspicious - but that's just me.

              The number of posts is not important and I shouldn't have mentioned it. Seems you are very intent on CISPA (and I understand that) but it's not the popular cause SOPA was.

              The dyslexia of public opinion - it flows on quickly to the next cause and can only sustain outrage for a limited time. Sad, but true.
              CISPA is just SOPA - same problem, different day...I'm not trying to be a soapbox, but I also don't want to see it swept under the dyslexic rug of public opinion, so when I see updates I think might be pertinent, I add them here, but I don't have be the only one banging the drum...:rolleyes: anyone can play....
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  • SOPA supporters meet in secret to strangle Internet freedom & online speech

    Behind closed doors, big SOPA supporting corporations are negotiating a massive trade agreement called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and sneaking in an intellectual property chapter that will strangle online speech and choke off Internet freedom. There is zero transparency as 'they' don't want us, or Congress, to know what's in the TPP IP section so we don't go all ninja netizens again like we did to stomp out SOPA/PIPA.
    By Ms. Smith on Mon, 05/14/12 - 1:11pm.

    Privacy and Security Fanatic: SOPA supporters meet in secret to strangle Internet freedom & online speech
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    • U.S. House - District 21 - GOP Primary
      279 of 279 Precincts Reporting - 100%
      Max Runoff Cands=2
      Name Party Votes Vote %
      Smith, Lamar (i) GOP 52,383 77%
      Mack, Richard GOP 10,104 15%
      Morgan, Richard GOP 5,866 9%

      Umm...where were you guys??? :rolleyes: Did you forget to set your clocks? :p


      btw: U.S. House - District 21 - Dem Primary
      274 of 274 Precincts Reporting - 100%
      Name Party Votes Vote %
      Duval, Candace Dem 9,518 61%
      Boone, Daniel Dem 6,068 39%
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    And that is why we will never see freedom again. People are too stupid to vote out those that oppose it.
    Signature

    Sal
    When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
    Beyond the Path

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