6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America

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You probably already know about the Vikings...but there are quite a few fascinating little history tips contained in this story your history teacher may have failed to mention...:rolleyes:

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America | Cracked.com



*and just because it's a 'Cracked' story, doesn't mean it couldn't be credible...:p
  • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
    We are taught all of that in England.

    Must be an American thing to tell you otherwise.

    Dan
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    • Originally Posted by jimbo13 View Post

      We are taught all of that in England.

      Must be an American thing to tell you otherwise.

      Dan
      Items like the massive plague, and the earlier settlements assimilating into native cultures, and even the part about Squanto - I think I must have forgotten the fact that he had been enslaved and sent to Spain, and picked up the other languages finally returning to the Americas...that in itself is quite a tale of experience...and an enlightening clue of the situation that befell the native populations. I was very surprised to read the population estimates being so high before it happened.

      These incidents in American history were taught in elementary, or preparatory school in England?

      I was curious in reading this list, if the American plagues were well known of in Europe, and if the "next generation" of settlements was predicated on that knowledge, or just lucky circumstance.
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      • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
        Sorry I forgot to put the smiley face behind my sentance. I was being facetious.

        I thought it was an interesting link you put up.

        I have never heard of the plague and it is plausible just like the Black Death was in Europe.

        Thing is if you go round London many graveyards have steps up to them from the pavement (sidewalk)

        What many don't know is the reason. It is because so many people died during the BD they had to be buried quickly and so were layed on top of each other maybe 6 deep then covered with earth.

        So with that in mind would there not be countless millions of skeletons littered across the US for archeologists to find and people going from East to West to have stumbled upon?

        Any ideas?

        Dan
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        • Profile picture of the author Kay King
          I was taught Columbus wasn't as bright as he was given credit for - and had no idea what it was he had found. That the "pilgrim" stories were more legend than truth, etc....that Squanto had previous experience with the "whites" and that pilgrims would not have survived without the knowledge shared by some native Americans.

          The "plague" I was taught about was the massive epidemics of smallbox AND measles that killed the native population. The diseases were brought by European explorers and Indians had no resistance. I remember studying Indian civilization, social customs and culture - and several other things mentioned in the article.

          I know textbooks have been changed to be politically correct in recent years - but I can't believe no one learns some of this stuff in school today.
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        • Originally Posted by jimbo13 View Post

          Sorry I forgot to put the smiley face behind my sentance. I was being facetious.

          I thought it was an interesting link you put up.

          I have never heard of the plague and it is plausible just like the Black Death was in Europe.

          Thing is if you go round London many graveyards have steps up to them from the pavement (sidewalk)

          What many don't know is the reason. It is because so many people died during the BD they had to be buried quickly and so were layed on top of each other maybe 6 deep then covered with earth.

          So with that in mind would there not be countless millions of skeletons littered across the US for archeologists to find and people going from East to West to have stumbled upon?

          Any ideas?

          Dan
          Interesting point - given the habit of many native tribes to have funeral pyres, would they have created massive pyres? Or was there enough time to dispose of the dead? Bones that are buried will survive for longer periods, but what of bones left exposed to the elements and the animals and insects? And would the animals be subject to being infected? Probably not...but if the villages were as large and as agrarian and not nomadic as they supposed - where are they? I have heard of, and read about large tribes before, but nothing as large as this suggests, and since it is mostly up to the tribal interpretations and stories...did everything happen so fast there was no apparent preparation for a next generation? And how did the ones who survived, survive? It certainly leaves a lot to the imagination...

          I guess my question would be, if it is not just conjecture, and could be supported by evidence - why would it still be suppressed? What's the motive?
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    Excellent read. I always wondered what the real story was after learning of the ruins in Illinois. Something wasn't right between our narratives and those ruins. The fact that so little is being publicized about that settlement is a sure clue that there is a major part of that history that we aren't supposed to know. They are also hiding a big bit of truth about ruins in the Grand Canyon. When the truth is scary for a gov - we need to really need to start digging to find out what it is.
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  • Profile picture of the author bhl2506
    I've read about some of this before, but this article puts it in perspective.
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    • Profile picture of the author TimPhelan
      Excellent article! Thanks MMM.
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      • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
        Thank you Mr. Hatch!

        That was truly educational and enlightening. Er, I mean 3M.

        Sorry, Mr. Hatch was my hot unconventional high school history teacher that I haven't thought of in years, and you just reminded me of him.

        Seriously though, what a great find!

        Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    The Japanese probably also visited the US West coast in the 400s AD (?).

    Polynesians surely discovered America, unless we can believe they visited every island in the Pacific, yet somehow never bumped into either the N or S America continents.

    Clovis arrow heads are thought by some to be European and brought by Europeans during the ice age before Asians crossed the Bering straight and became Native Americans. They were named after a town in New Mexico where they were first discovered, but that's the farthest West they've been found. And the farther East you go, the more common they are. There's tons of Clovis arrowheads around the Chesapeake.

    There's fossil and DNA evidence that shows that Australian aborigines colonized S. America something like 40,000 years ago.
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    Pretty good story and I know this guy's credentials are impeccable. We should all completely disbelieve everything we were ever taught and believe this guy. For sure.

    Jack O'Brien is the Editor in Chief of Cracked.com.

    (now don't get me wrong I have always loved that magazine) but it just CRACKS me up how eager people are to believe anything different from what the man has ESTABLISHED. I am one of them but I am beginning to see that truth as we know it may be lies (so what else is new) and more relevant, the lies that we know may be the truth - but maybe not. Whose to say if we were fooled before or being fooled now - probably both.

    It's all "Maya" - "Illusion" so put whatever spin on it you want to. Believe whatever you want.

    You are all cracked. ehehehehehe




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    • Originally Posted by Patrician View Post

      Pretty good story and I know this guy's credentials are impeccable. We should all completely disbelieve everything we were ever taught and believe this guy. For sure.

      Jack O'Brien is the Editor in Chief of Cracked.com.


      Well, I know a lot of what is written at Cracked in a style akin to the likes of The Onion, or the Lampoon - (and of course Mad) - but they do sometimes offer things that are food for thought...:rolleyes:

      *What happened to the girl in the tin-foil hat?
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      • Profile picture of the author LarryC
        Originally Posted by MoneyMagnetMagnate View Post

        Well, I know a lot of what is written at Cracked in a style akin to the likes of The Onion, or the Lampoon - (and of course Mad) - but they do sometimes offer things that are food for thought...:rolleyes:

        *What happened to the girl in the tin-foil hat?
        It's an interesting article, but he should have included some scholarly references.
        I've heard some of it before, but nothing nearly that extreme (e.g. that plagues were the main cause of Native Americans being wiped out).

        I've come to be skeptical of everyone. I certainly don't trust the mainstream media or history books. But alternative info is just as likely to be distorted.
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  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    If you mean me, I wish I knew.

    ... I really wish I knew.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexander Smith
    I love Cracked dot com
    They always have really entertaining articles to read
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      When I was a child we used to find Indian artifacts all the time when the fields were tilled. Never found a bone - but found many arrowheads and was amazed at how finely made they were.
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  • Profile picture of the author krenisis
    Aren't threads about any type of politics forbidden?
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    • Originally Posted by krenisis View Post

      Aren't threads about any type of politics forbidden?
      This article doesn't raise political questions - it raises historical and societal ones, that could have had political implications. :rolleyes: As LarryC pointed out, without proper reference and footnotes, at best it would be an interesting alternative theory based on conjecture to consider.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    Here's my point of view when I consider this article.

    About 8 thousand years ago someone was mining copper in Michigan. They have no clue who it was because there are no legends and not ONE bit of evidence to tell who and how outside of stone tools in the mines. It would have taken a pretty large camp, and means of transport (probably water in that area) to sustain the mines -- but there is no evidence of either a camp or any transport.

    There are ruins being discovered along the Mississippi and in Illinois, etc that were from a pretty large society. Why these are not more publicized, I'm not sure. Either they are still new enough to still be being excavated or they don't think we need to really know about it.

    I have a friend who is a treasure hunter - not an amateur, but a very well established guy. He was in the Grand Canyon area for around a year. Shots were fired. He's not talking -will not say a WORD about what is there. He did point me to some interesting history though. Around 100 years ago a man working for the Smithsonian was in the Grand Canyon area. He found what he claimed to be artifacts so astounding it would change our whole perception of US history. Suddenly, the Smithsonian knows nothing about this guy - says he never worked there, yadda yadda. But they missed a newspaper article in their cover-up.

    More? An archaeologist found "giant" skeletons of a couple of people that were around 8 - 9 feet tall. He gave them to the Smithsonian and they disappeared never to be seen again. A little later some photoshopped crap of 40 ft skeletons started showing up on line almost like a disinformation attempt. He did have pics of the skeletons. They had artifact accessories (hats, spears, etc) that almost looked Viking - or Asian.

    Why is the Smithsonian trying to hide things? The photographer of the largest crystals in the world (selenite, Mexico) contacted me around 5 or 6 years ago (I have the article on my newsletter archives still) - the Smithsonian was trying to force him to donate his pics. He refused and I got an awesome world premier of those pictures. But what is with the Smithsonian?

    The same guy I know that went to the Grand Canyon and had the trouble with "authorities" being upset about info possibly being released, gave me another bit of info. He found some very interesting gold artifacts in WY. He tried to get one of the official authorities to deal with him on these, but they just told him it was impossible that he found them where he did and would not even look at them. He found them 10 feet underground. He says that there are a LOT of artifacts that could really change our minds about history that just get melted down for the metals because the authorities refuse to acknowledge them.

    There are also a lot of stone artifacts being found UNDER volcanic layers. Again - authorities refuse to acknowledge them -- they just say it's impossible for them to be there. Period. End of story.

    There is a lot more to history than we will ever be "allowed" to know. That's one of the thrills I get from my niche. I get to talk to the people who do the finding that the authorities refuse to verify.
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    • Profile picture of the author highhopes
      Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

      Here's my point of view when I consider this article.

      About 8 thousand years ago someone was mining copper in Michigan. They have no clue who it was because there are no legends and not ONE bit of evidence to tell who and how outside of stone tools in the mines. It would have taken a pretty large camp, and means of transport (probably water in that area) to sustain the mines -- but there is no evidence of either a camp or any transport.

      There are ruins being discovered along the Mississippi and in Illinois, etc that were from a pretty large society. Why these are not more publicized, I'm not sure. Either they are still new enough to still be being excavated or they don't think we need to really know about it.

      I have a friend who is a treasure hunter - not an amateur, but a very well established guy. He was in the Grand Canyon area for around a year. Shots were fired. He's not talking -will not say a WORD about what is there. He did point me to some interesting history though. Around 100 years ago a man working for the Smithsonian was in the Grand Canyon area. He found what he claimed to be artifacts so astounding it would change our whole perception of US history. Suddenly, the Smithsonian knows nothing about this guy - says he never worked there, yadda yadda. But they missed a newspaper article in their cover-up.

      More? An archaeologist found "giant" skeletons of a couple of people that were around 8 - 9 feet tall. He gave them to the Smithsonian and they disappeared never to be seen again. A little later some photoshopped crap of 40 ft skeletons started showing up on line almost like a disinformation attempt. He did have pics of the skeletons. They had artifact accessories (hats, spears, etc) that almost looked Viking - or Asian.

      Why is the Smithsonian trying to hide things? The photographer of the largest crystals in the world (selenite, Mexico) contacted me around 5 or 6 years ago (I have the article on my newsletter archives still) - the Smithsonian was trying to force him to donate his pics. He refused and I got an awesome world premier of those pictures. But what is with the Smithsonian?

      The same guy I know that went to the Grand Canyon and had the trouble with "authorities" being upset about info possibly being released, gave me another bit of info. He found some very interesting gold artifacts in WY. He tried to get one of the official authorities to deal with him on these, but they just told him it was impossible that he found them where he did and would not even look at them. He found them 10 feet underground. He says that there are a LOT of artifacts that could really change our minds about history that just get melted down for the metals because the authorities refuse to acknowledge them.

      There are also a lot of stone artifacts being found UNDER volcanic layers. Again - authorities refuse to acknowledge them -- they just say it's impossible for them to be there. Period. End of story.

      There is a lot more to history than we will ever be "allowed" to know. That's one of the thrills I get from my niche. I get to talk to the people who do the finding that the authorities refuse to verify.
      Interesting stuff Sal, I have read of such findings before,
      Jonathan Carver`s take on the copper mines discovered supposedly before the big copper mines starting point in history.

      Wisconsin's Ancient Copper Miners
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  • That is the kind of speculative discussion I was hoping may arise Sal and highhopes, the ones that offer alternatives to what we have been told -

    How can we be sure? All the facts aren't in on many questions...the world is a jigsaw puzzle.

    Even simple finds like: Kennewick Man

    Mysteries abound...they make life 'interesting'...:rolleyes:

    I have read articles too about the 'orientals' in the Colorado, and the Grand Canyon region. The copper mines are new to me, but huge ancient city civilizations that died off 'suddenly' are know of too...it's all interesting stuff...:rolleyes:

    There must be tons of interesting finds that 'surfaced', then were buried or forgotten about by the general populace...


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  • Profile picture of the author dallas playboy
    Take a look at Jack O'Brian's photo on Cracked.Com ; Does he look like a guy that's
    a historian? I think Chocise, Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, must be rolling over in their graves
    at all the pale-faces believing this guys bull****.
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    • Profile picture of the author Heidi
      I heard about Cahokia and Monk's Mound just last year. Did some digging and found these incredible ruins have been known about since our founding fathers. The reason we did not learn about these in school and that it is only now "coming out" has to do with Manifest Destiny. Not all Native American tribes were created equal; however, Manifest Destiny helps us understand why we termed them ALL "savages." It puts much of this into perspective as to why we did not learn this in school.

      Archaeologists in Ohio and Illinois know quite a bit about these ruins. They have all formulated their own opinions, but they all agree that a great civilization of Native Americans formed advanced societies with knowledge of the solar system and mathematics. And, yes, the Iroquois stuff I also researched and found to be true.

      If you are the least bit curious, go find out for yourselves (simply Google Cahokia). I am angry that I have been cheated out of my own understanding of my nation's history for so long. Our family is planning a trip to view many of the ruins for ourselves and are making it a priority to learn as much as we can. We have also robbed the Native Americans of an understanding of their own history.

      FYI, I don't agree with everything in the link to the article in the OP's post; however, if you do the research for yourself, you will find much of it to be true.
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