how did you learn english?

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hi im from ph.. English is my second language and i want to be good at it. Can you tell me how did you learn english
  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    I learned it from my family. But as a second language, here's what I think you might do.

    Find some American TV comedies like Seinfeld, Mash, Friends, etc. If they've been translated to your native language, all the better. Just watch them in English. Buy the DVD sets. You'll pick up the language quickly, especially if you've watched them in your own language first language.

    If I were to watch Gilligan's Island in Swahili I'd pick up the language quickly because I've seen every episode many times.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ineedhelp2013
      Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post


      Find some American TV comedies like Seinfeld, Mash, Friends, etc.
      Thanks for your reply...But i guest that really take to much time.
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      • Profile picture of the author mohsinmallik
        Originally Posted by Ineedhelp2013 View Post

        Thanks for your reply...But i guest that really take to much time.
        Without spending time, how could you even think of learning a new thing. It is a basic requirement for you to understand a new language. It will take time to have grasp of the language.
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        • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
          Originally Posted by mohsinmallik View Post

          Without spending time, how could you even think of learning a new thing. It is a basic requirement for you to understand a new language. It will take time to have grasp of the language.
          As fewer and fewer things are being held sacred, expect some major changes on how education takes place. In the not too distant future, one may be able to just get get data directly uploaded into one's brain to learn languages instantly:
          Downloading Data Directly Into Your Brain? - Is This A Good Idea : Science Channel

          "More recently, a prominent British educator, Independent Schools Council chief Chris Parry, last year blithely predicted that within 30 years, students would be downloading lessons directly into their brains. Earlier this year, an organization called the Innerspace Foundation offered a prize for the first device that bypasses the need for traditional learning of information. "
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    • Profile picture of the author Thomas
      Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post

      Find some American TV comedies like Seinfeld, Mash, Friends, etc.
      I'd pepper it with a few non-American TV comedies too; otherwise, you might be inclined to believe "like", "totally", and "awesome" are the three most common words in the English language.
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      • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
        Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

        I'd pepper it with a few non-American TV comedies too; otherwise, you might be inclined to believe "like", "totally", and "awesome" are the three most common words in the English language.
        OMG aren't they?

        Dan
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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

        I'd pepper it with a few non-American TV comedies too; otherwise, you might be inclined to believe "like", "totally", and "awesome" are the three most common words in the English language.
        What do you listen to? Steriotypical hollywood teen girl movies? Oh my GAWWD! Gag me with a spoon!

        Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
        Originally Posted by Thomas View Post

        I'd pepper it with a few non-American TV comedies too; otherwise, you might be inclined to believe "like", "totally", and "awesome" are the three most common words in the English language.
        Thomas, that was like totally awesome, man! :p

        Terra
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    • Profile picture of the author yukon
      Banned
      Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post

      I learned it from my family. But as a second language, here's what I think you might do.

      Find some American TV comedies like Seinfeld, Mash, Friends, etc. If they've been translated to your native language, all the better. Just watch them in English. Buy the DVD sets. You'll pick up the language quickly, especially if you've watched them in your own language first language.

      If I were to watch Gilligan's Island in Swahili I'd pick up the language quickly because I've seen every episode many times.

      I swear this is true, & I'm not trying to disrespect anyone.

      My last off-line job I worked with an Asian guy & his name was "Otay Boatwheat" (translation problem?).

      His parents immigrated to the US & liked "The Little Rascals" TV show.

      He was a funny guy, I guess he didn't have an option with a name like that.
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  • Profile picture of the author taskemann
    I learned English from 3'rd grade to the 10'th grade in the elementary school and 2 years at high-school. But what's really funny is that I've learned more English from video games and TV than I've learned at school. :p
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  • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
    English is sort of my first language, but I guess my brain processes it a bit like a second language (long story).

    Anyway, I suggest that you learn English according to what is relevant to you. If it is for business, business English. If it is for shooting movies, English relevant to that. The fact is that even native speakers of English won't fully understand "shop talk" in fields outside of their areas of expertise.

    If you want to learn conversational English, then, yes, acquiring the scripts to sit-coms and learning what they mean could do wonders for your English. It tends to be only the most advanced speakers of English as a second language who can understand comedy. Comedy is not only full of slang, but cultural references as well.

    I speak more than one language, not so well, but still managed to land gigs interpreting so there you go. The other thing is to chat with friendly English speakers if you have the opportunity to do so. Beer might help for that.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jesse L
    If I were going to learn a new language I would give rosetta stone a try. They have had some great results and are well recognized.

    Amazon.com: Rosetta Stone English (American)...Amazon.com: Rosetta Stone English (American)... (not an affiliate link)
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  • Profile picture of the author affshow
    English is my second language.
    Listen to the radio
    Don't always have a pen in hand. Sometimes it helps to just listen.
    Watch English TV
    Children's programming is very useful for ESL learners.
    Watch movies
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  • Profile picture of the author stamim2003
    If anyone from family. Otherwise school teacher. Your eagerness.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ineedhelp2013
    OK guys thanks for your replies.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    English is a hard language to learn. Of course, whenever possible it is best to learn it in a culture that speaks it as a first language, since you can't separate a language and its culture. You start by reading books for children and advance in age levels of the books as you learn. If you have a copy in a native language as well as one in English it will help you to understand some of the idioms that seem strange to you.

    The suggestions for watching movies, too, are good suggestions.

    Speaking the language is almost a necessity for learning it well, so find a partner to speak it with. Do things together and make speaking in English a requirement during that time so you can start to learn to actually think in the language a little bit.
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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

      English is a hard language to learn. Of course, whenever possible it is best to learn it in a culture that speaks it as a first language, since you can't separate a language and its culture.<snip>
      I was meaning to touch on that. People whose first language is English might not actually understand each other very well, since the language, cultural references, slang, accent etc. can still be so different. In China, a Caribbean guy and I, though we're both native English speakers, found it easier to understand each other speaking Mandarin, LOL. Similarly, sometimes people from France and Quebec opt to speak to each other in English, since some people from France find Quebecois French hard to understand.
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      • Profile picture of the author Actonbarr
        Take spoken classes of English language.
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      • Profile picture of the author HeySal
        Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post

        I was meaning to touch on that. People whose first language is English might not actually understand each other very well, since the language, cultural references, slang, accent etc. can still be so different. In China, a Caribbean guy and I, though we're both native English speakers, found it easier to understand each other speaking Mandarin, LOL. Similarly, sometimes people from France and Quebec opt to speak to each other in English, since some people from France find Quebecois French hard to understand.
        Yeah, every language spoken in a vast number of regions is going to have dialects. I had a problem in Germany with High and Low German.

        I also had a problem with some of the Southern dialects when I was in Germany with my ex who was in the military.
        Conversation:
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    • Profile picture of the author taskemann
      Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

      English is a hard language to learn
      Did you know that English comes from the germanic language which they spoke in Germania during the Roman Empire? That's why English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish are so similar. Because they all come from the germanic language.

      So it's much easier for an "dutchman" or for someone from Scandinavia to learn English than it is for, let's say, a Spaniard. Just because the languages are so similar!
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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by taskemann View Post

        Did you know that English comes from the germanic language which they spoke in Germania during the Roman Empire? That's why English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish are so similar. Because they all come from the germanic language.

        So it's much easier for an "dutchman" or for someone from Scandinavia to learn English than it is for, let's say, a Spaniard. Just because the languages are so similar!
        Maybe, but Spanish DOES have a LOT of words that are near identical. And Danish has a VERY simple grammar even if they have things like gender in plurals.

        But yeah, many know they are germanic languages.

        Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author JustVisiting
        Originally Posted by taskemann View Post

        Did you know that English comes from the germanic language which they spoke in Germania during the Roman Empire? That's why English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish are so similar. Because they all come from the germanic language.

        So it's much easier for an "dutchman" or for someone from Scandinavia to learn English than it is for, let's say, a Spaniard. Just because the languages are so similar!
        There's a lot of French thrown in too! 1066 and all that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Barboza
      Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

      English is a hard language to learn.

      Really? I have always thought that English is a very easy language to learn. I learned it by myself mostly. I used books and dictionaries to learn vocabulary. I listened to music and watched videos in English.

      I suggest to op to find a learning pal on internet so you can speak on Skype.
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      • Profile picture of the author HeySal
        Originally Posted by Alex Barboza View Post

        Really? I have always thought that English is a very easy language to learn. I learned it by myself mostly. I used books and dictionaries to learn vocabulary. I listened to music and watched videos in English.

        I suggest to op to find a learning pal on internet so you can speak on Skype.
        You might just have a natural aptitude for it. If English was easy, you shouldn't have much problem with any other language either. You also don't say where you are from. If your culture has a lot of similarities to ours (or any English speaking culture) it will be that much easier for you to pick it up.
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        Sal
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        • Profile picture of the author Alex Barboza
          Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

          You might just have a natural aptitude for it. If English was easy, you shouldn't have much problem with any other language either. You also don't say where you are from. If your culture has a lot of similarities to ours (or any English speaking culture) it will be that much easier for you to pick it up.

          I am Colombian and have always lived here. But I have been very interested in learning English since I was a little kid so I think that made a difference
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Well, it is my native language, but I DO know how I got a larger vocabulary, etc... and acquired OTHER languages. I don't know that much about the philipines, but the language IS based on an alphabet that is based on the latin one, so you have a LITTLE bit of a headstart. ALSO, from what I understand, there are a lot of people there that speak english. If your media has subtitles, USE THEM! Listen to programs from america, britain, etc.... Look on the internet. Try to ALWAYS have related reading material, or audio. It is best to have BOTH!

    Language is a HABIT! If you try to conciously translate everything, it will be slow, error laden, etc.... So you want to be exposed enough that you can just want to speak english, and you do. By exposed, I mean in the way you would learn to play a piano. Just hearing isn't enough, but it gives you an idea of what is correct, and an ear for hearing it. and playing the piano is a habit ALSO. People don't generally think of each key stroke, etc...

    MOST spoken classes are bad for MANY reasons. For ONE, they are setup for a person that is above average and has a certain base. FEW are that good, and NOBODY has that base, so it ends up slowing down EVERYONE, and most don't do well. A POOR learner, with guided instruction based on where THEY are at could likely learn over 3 times as fast. They won't be studying needless things(Because they don't have that base.), and will concentrate on things that need work(Because their deficiencies will be acertained.).

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Geordie John
    I learned my English mostly from these weird Geordie people i grew up with. They speak kind of funny...
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  • Profile picture of the author ImWendy
    When I was little, my parents knew very little English. I learned to speak English by watching Sesame Street and other children's shows. By the time I started kindergarten, I spoke better English than my parents and I speak Spanish fluently as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author bablu19
    The chat with the people who know to speak english is the best way to learn the language.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    I learned by living and growing up in The United States.
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    • Profile picture of the author yukon
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      Originally Posted by Michael Ten View Post

      I learned by living and growing up in The United States.

      That always worked for me, I thought it was easy to learn.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

    Get yourself an American significant other.
    Lololololol. Yes. This will help you learn English FAST!!! SUPER FAST! Lololol. Seriously, it probably really would. I hope learning English would not be your prime motivation. There are MANY wonderful wonderful wonderful women that speak GREAT English.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lou Diamond
    Hello,
    I am 53 years old born in the United States and still trying to learn the English language.
    Being raised in New York has not helped the situation.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheMango
    Banned
    english is my second language too. :-)
    first I learned some at school.

    but the main thing that made me good at it was by... watching tv, and listening to music

    though my voice still "shakes" a bit when I talk. but my writing is good :-) and for the interwebs, that is what is important :-)

    I started watching the sitcom "friends" when I was about 10 or so (I am only 17 :-))

    but actually now I think american shows, is the best tv. true story :-D
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  • Profile picture of the author gabysanchez225
    The pillars of learning a language are speaking reading writing and listening. Do all of them as often as possible. Knock out 2 or 3 at once and transcribe an audiobook or a TV show. Good luck!
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    • Profile picture of the author Fabianner
      I learnt English language from my school and college. It was there in my school curriculum. It is my second language.
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  • Profile picture of the author Samker
    Simply, "Cowboy" movies...
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  • Profile picture of the author newqueenoftheweb
    I learned English by watching Sesame Street and reading the English version of Reader's Digest. Children's TV programs are easy to follow as they are spoken in simple language. Reader's Digest is not only entertaining and informative but an easy read as well. With this method, by the time I actually got to live in England at the age of 23, I was very fluent and had also completed a translator's course.
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  • Profile picture of the author ianbirch
    You can have my misses....you would,nt get a chance to speak though...she never shuts up.lol
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  • Profile picture of the author adamzanber
    There are two easy ways watch alot of english programs and speak with people daily.
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  • Profile picture of the author danielotc
    i moved to a english speaking country. besy way to learn a new language
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  • Profile picture of the author danielotc
    spanish is next
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  • Profile picture of the author kungz13
    I learn it (mostly) from video games when i was a kid, especially rpg games genre that contain lot of conversations in many situation in the game, i use my local - english dictionary to understand the game storyline until i finish the game.

    I tried another game and i repeat this method until i automatically don't need my dictionary anymore, well a little bit nerdy but trust me it works, and it was very much fun
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  • Profile picture of the author superdubaus
    In my opinion forum posting may be good source to learn English, I remember when I was join a forum and my English was not so good that time, I don't make proper sentence and the forum members tell me to learn English.
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