The 'Scientific Accident That May Change The World'

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More Good News About The 'Scientific Accident That May Change The World'



See The Scientific Accident That May Change The World (Or At Least Your Battery Life)

http://www.upworthy.com/see-the-scie...your-battery-l
  • Profile picture of the author taskemann
    Oh... I thought is was the Powerpuff Girls
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    And I was hoping for the "how to get cows to produce chocolate milk" thing. Drat.
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    Sal
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
    This is one of those things that sounds simple and has potentially profound implications.

    Wow.
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    • Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

      This is one of those things that sounds simple and has potentially profound implications.

      Wow.
      I thought so too - potentially profound implications is right on the money - and these batteries would be tiny, efficient, and importantly - biodegradable.
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        MMM,
        I thought so too - potentially profound implications is right on the money - and these batteries would be tiny, efficient, and importantly - biodegradable.
        There's so much going on in areas like this that could change the world, if they just had a bit more funding or attention.

        I have a friend who's doing research in algaeculture, and the potential there is similarly mind-bending. And equally simple.

        Paul
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        • Profile picture of the author Kurt
          Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

          MMM,There's so much going on in areas like this that could change the world, if they just had a bit more funding or attention.

          I have a friend who's doing research in algaeculture, and the potential there is similarly mind-bending. And equally simple.

          Paul
          These algae lamps eat 150-200 times more CO2 than trees, and they produce light doing it.

          This Micro-Algae Lamp Absorbs 150-200 Times More CO2 than a Tree! (Video) : TreeHugger
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          • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
            Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

            These algae lamps eat 150-200 times more CO2 than trees, and they produce light doing it.

            This Micro-Algae Lamp Absorbs 150-200 Times More CO2 than a Tree! (Video) : TreeHugger
            This stuff is sooooo interesting.

            Some of the comments under that piece reminded me just how scientifically illiterate most people are. Which would be okay, if they didn't insist they knew more than they do.

            [sigh]


            Paul
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          • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
            Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

            These algae lamps eat 150-200 times more CO2 than trees, and they produce light doing it.

            This Micro-Algae Lamp Absorbs 150-200 Times More CO2 than a Tree! (Video) : TreeHugger
            Some of those comments under the story are pretty funny. Looks like those "lamps" were photoshopped into the picture though.
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            • Profile picture of the author Kurt
              Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

              Some of those comments under the story are pretty funny. Looks like those "lamps" were photoshopped into the picture though.
              I agree the lamps are probably photoshopped. And there's alot of criticism of these lamps. Maybe it's BS. But the point is that science is capable of doing great things.

              I didn't link to the best article though. I was in a hurry and copy/pasted the wrong URL. If you want more info, I'm sure you guys know how to find Google.
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              • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
                Kurt,
                I'm sure you guys know how to find Google.
                We look that up on Bing, right?


                Paul
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              • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
                Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

                I agree the lamps are probably photoshopped. And there's alot of criticism of these lamps. Maybe it's BS. But the point is that science is capable of doing great things.

                I didn't link to the best article though. I was in a hurry and copy/pasted the wrong URL. If you want more info, I'm sure you guys know how to find Google.
                I'd never heard of the lamps before, so my comment wasn't related to the efficacy or usefulness of them. I actually figured it was a legit invention because you posted it.

                It's too bad they used an obviously faked picture, because that leaves room for speculation as to whether the whole thing is a hoax. It's not like there isn't precedent for that online.
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          • Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

            These algae lamps eat 150-200 times more CO2 than trees, and they produce light doing it.

            This Micro-Algae Lamp Absorbs 150-200 Times More CO2 than a Tree! (Video) : TreeHugger
            These algae lamps would be a great idea - if China needed to copy anything, they need to put these badboys in downtown Beijing - they could kill two birds with one stone, instead of actually killing birds, and everybody else with the pollution.
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Yeah, when I was a kid, some people mused how big a farad capacitor would have to be. Farad is the BASE measurement. Yet it was to be over FOURTY years before I saw even a 1 farad capacitor. IT was probably about .5sf in size! This claims to be a FAR higher capacity in a smaller space.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Steve,

      Funny you mention that. I saw one recently, at BestBuy. I think that was the fastest double-take I've ever done that didn't involve a very tall redhead.

      Asked the guy there what consumer device could possibly require a Farad capacitor. Seems they use them on Very Big Speakers.

      Pretty sure you don't want to get too close to one of those speakers...


      Paul
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    • Profile picture of the author David Maschke
      Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

      Yeah, when I was a kid, some people mused how big a farad capacitor would have to be. Farad is the BASE measurement. Yet it was to be over FOURTY years before I saw even a 1 farad capacitor. IT was probably about .5sf in size! This claims to be a FAR higher capacity in a smaller space.

      Steve

      I was thinking the same thing. When I was reading this, I was wondering how big of a capacitor this could be made into. The ability to capture a lightning bolt and store that immense energy would change the world overnight. It would be the holy grail of cheap, instant and renewable energy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Science is really amazing. Graphene is amazing. I hope that graphene research like this lowers the cost of living eventually, since it might help lower energy costs.
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  • World's Strongest Material: Top 10 Uses : Discovery News

    Graphene is strong, lightweight, conducts electricity and resists rust.
    Graphene is the world's new wonder material. It's the thinnest electronic material ever invented, consisting of a layer of carbon atoms just a single atom thick -- the atoms are arranged in a hexagonal pattern. It weighs almost nothing, coming in at only 0.77 grams for a square meter.
    ANALYSIS: Now Nanotubes Can Be Spun into Spools of Wires

    But it's no lightweight. Graphene is 100 times stronger than steel of the same thickness. It conducts both heat and electricity better than copper, and has outstanding optical and mechanical properties. If it could be produced on an industrial scale, graphene might revolutionize fields such as electronics and even body armor. Recently, the European Union awarded the Finnish company Nokia a $1.3 billion research grant to commercialize graphene. What follows are 10 areas in which graphene could make a huge difference -- some sooner than you think.
    This stuff is beginning to sound too good to be true...
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  • Profile picture of the author jay walters
    I hope this technology would be improve to a higher level. I believe this would have a great impact in our history.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    I have to confess - as much as I love some areas of science, when it comes to technology, I just don't get it. I'm taking everyone's word for it that the batteries are exciting.

    When it comes to the algae research -and bacteria, now that stokes my pipe. There's a bacteria that eats plastic. Very soon we might be able to get rid of all the plastic clogging up our landfills and start working on that palstic island in the middle of the ocean. By that time we might just be making plastic from hemp so plastic would become biodegradable. Just getting rid of the plastic pollution can save whole ecosystems. And don't even get me started on the oil munching variety of bacteria. There's also the bacteria that produce gold, but considering the human greed factor that has put us in the mess we're in, I think maybe we have enough gold already.
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Sal,

      I must be missing something. GMO foods are bad, but GMO bacteria are okay? In the wild???

      Genetically modified micro-organisms are among the most potentially dangerous things humans have ever invented. They make anything Monsanto & Co have done look benign - even benevolent - by comparison.

      Think "Ice 9."


      Paul

      PS: AIUI, the "gold producing" bugs don't create gold. They just eat compounds that contain gold and ... "excrete" ... the purer material.
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      • Profile picture of the author HeySal
        Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

        Sal,

        I must be missing something. GMO foods are bad, but GMO bacteria are okay? In the wild???

        Genetically modified micro-organisms are among the most potentially dangerous things humans have ever invented. They make anything Monsanto & Co have done look benign - even benevolent - by comparison.

        Think "Ice 9."


        Paul

        PS: AIUI, the "gold producing" bugs don't create gold. They just eat compounds that contain gold and ... "excrete" ... the purer material.
        First, yes - the elements for gold have to be present for the bacteria to produce it - but, hey - it's still the bacteria that turn those elements into the useable form - same with silver and a few other metals.

        Second - - plastic eating bacteria was not GMO - it was FOUND. I'm sure some idiot will try to GMO a few of these types of bacteria, but, in actuality - all we have to do is get the stuff that's naturally extant to breed into quantities sufficient to take care of the messes.
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        Sal
        When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          Sal,
          Second - - plastic eating bacteria was not GMO - it was FOUND.
          Okay, that's weird. How would something like that evolve? What's its normal diet?


          Paul
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          • Profile picture of the author HeySal
            Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

            Sal,Okay, that's weird. How would something like that evolve? What's its normal diet?


            Paul
            They found it eating plastic in the Sargasso Sea - an area that's pretty muchly void of nutrient's. At the time they aren't sure what's going on with the by-product produced and if the by product is "green" or poisonous. It does strip phosphorus, but that could be reintroduced, it seems. Not sure what it's normal diet is. Maybe it is eating the plastic because there's not much else to eat there. Bacteria is pretty adaptable. Just have to watch and see what they find out and if we can actually use it for our benefit.
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            Sal
            When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
            Beyond the Path

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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Many years ago I was involved with CDC and the Crays. One of our biggest problems was cooling the boards. The solution was a blood plasma substitue called fluorinert. Later, it was replaced with liquid nitrogen.

    A lot of scientists came and went during that time. One of them expressed concern about mixing fluorinert and liquid nitrogen. Two days later we urgently and physically relocated the equipment.

    An new bacteria was found inside the tubes. Later, it was determined that the mixture separated bacteria from normal blood cells and that was a stepping stone to solve AIDS.

    Jeffery 100% :-)
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    In the minute it took me to write this post.. someone died of Covid 19. RIP.
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