Raccoons: Smart As Monkeys, Smarter Than Some People

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Raccoon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Intelligence
Only a few studies have been undertaken to determine the mental abilities of raccoons, most of them based on the animal's sense of touch. In a study by the ethologist H. B. Davis in 1908, raccoons were able to open 11 of 13 complex locks in fewer than 10 tries and had no problems repeating the action when the locks were rearranged or turned upside down. Davis concluded they understood the abstract principles of the locking mechanisms and their learning speed was equivalent to that of rhesus macaques.[64] Studies in 1963, 1973, 1975 and 1992 concentrated on raccoon memory showed they can remember the solutions to tasks for up to three years.[65] In a study by B. Pohl in 1992, raccoons were able to instantly differentiate between identical and different symbols three years after the short initial learning phase.[65] Stanislas Dehaene reports in his book The Number Sense raccoons can distinguish boxes containing two or four grapes from those containing three.[66]"
  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    You think THIS is something? SQUIRRELS may be roughly as smart!

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

      You think THIS is something? SQUIRRELS may be roughly as smart!

      Steve
      I never thought about squirrel intelligence, but it makes total sense. I guess I've vaguely wondered how they remember where they put food. The answer is that squirrels make maps:

      Squirrels can be deceptive

      Researchers recently reported that the rodents put on elaborate shows of deceptive caching to thwart would-be thieves. The behavior increased in a lab experiment after squirrels observed humans stealing their peanuts. The researchers called the finding a sign that squirrels can interpret intentions of others, though it could just be a case of learned behavior. Other studies have shown the critters make three-dimensional maps to recall where they cache their nuts. And squirrels in California will cover their fur in the scent of rattlesnakes to mask their own scent from predators.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

      You think THIS is something? SQUIRRELS may be roughly as smart!

      Steve
      There was a famous squirrel that was a master spy. He teamed up with a moose. They even had a TV show depicting their exploits.

      But this was a Flying Squirrel. They may be different from ordinary squirrels.
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      One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

      Terence Fletcher: "There are no two words in the English language more harmful than Good Job." Whiplash.
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      • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        There was a famous squirrel that was a master spy. He teamed up with a moose. They even had a TV show depicting their exploits.

        But this was a Flying Squirrel. They may be different from ordinary squirrels.
        Don't be silly -- they're actors.
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        • Profile picture of the author socialentry
          Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post

          Don't be silly -- they're actors.
          So was Chuck Norris
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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        There was a famous squirrel that was a master spy. He teamed up with a moose. They even had a TV show depicting their exploits.

        But this was a Flying Squirrel. They may be different from ordinary squirrels.

        YEAH! Unfortunately, the moose kept pulling dangerous things out of a hat. He should have listened to the squirrel. 8-(

        Steve
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

          YEAH! Unfortunately, the moose kept pulling dangerous things out of a hat. He should have listened to the squirrel. 8-(

          Steve
          "Watch me pull a rabbit out of a hat!"
          "Again?"
          (Something missing here)
          "Are they friendly spirits?"
          "Friendly! Just listen"

          Rocky J. Squirrel & Bullwinkle J. Moose. (Maybe one "J" is off)
          That's a memory fragment from 55 years ago.
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          One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

          Terence Fletcher: "There are no two words in the English language more harmful than Good Job." Whiplash.
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          • Profile picture of the author seasoned
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            "Watch me pull a rabbit out of a hat!"
            "Again?"
            (Something missing here)
            "Are they friendly spirits?"
            "Friendly! Just listen"

            Rocky J. Squirrel & Bullwinkle J. Moose. (Maybe one "J" is off)
            That's a memory fragment from 55 years ago.
            YEAH, but it was always a lion or some such. After "AGAIN?", the squirrel says, at least I think often... "That trick NEVER works!".


            Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
    Listen up kids... this is where the Wayback Machine came from.
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    OK, MAYBE I was wrong. It HAS been a LONG time:


    Steve
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