by ThomM
27 replies
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This is just amazing.
Shi Yan Ming stands just over 5 feet tall, yet from an inch away he can hit you harder and cause more damage then getting hit by a car going 30mph.
  • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
    Tiptoes very quietly away...

    Wouldn't want to make him mad!

    Sound like he packs a wallop!

    Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    Oh this is nothing. I'm finally perfecting a look I've worked on for years that will crush a very HUGE jerk without even laying hands on. It's called the "you're pissing off the old lady glare". Never messes up the nail polish.
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    Sal
    When the Roads and Paths end, learn to guide yourself through the wilderness
    Beyond the Path

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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    He CHEATED! It was more like 3 inches, and he continued through. So it is STILL great, but NOT as advertised.

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
    The only undefeated heavyweight champ Rocky Marciano had a vicious 6 inch punch.


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    "It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. -- Mark Twain

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  • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
    [DELETED]
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
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    "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Thanks so much for posting the link. The article is so dead on accurate, I wanted to post it in it's entirety.

      Enjoy....


      "Here are some observations:
      The kiai master was genuine in his belief that he was an unbeatable fighter. He was so certain that he put his money, health, and reputation publicly on the line. That is the genuine faith of a sure man.
      The kiai master’s students were genuine in their belief that their master was a powerful fighter. Any one of them could have just kicked him in the gut to prove a point, to defeat their teacher in a fair match. Instead, they found themselves thrown to the mat without being touched.

      There is some very interesting psychology going on here. It’s a fascinating exercise to put yourself into the shoes of those in the story. This is a textbook, real life case of the emperor’s new clothes - a mass delusion. Let’s go back to the dojo, before the kiai master was humiliated by defeat.


      *****
      Imagine you are the kiai master. You carry yourself with charisma and confidence. In a fight in your dojo, you spin your arms and your opponents tumble to the mat! You are unstoppable: you have seemingly magical abilities, and the evidence to prove it!

      *****
      Now imagine yourself as a student. You observe match after match where the kiai master defeats those around him without touching them! Finally, it is your turn to fight him, and you find yourself rolling on the mat just like everyone else. This kiai master is amazing!

      *****
      Finally, imagine yourself as a fresh onlooker. Are you convinced of these jedi-like powers? Can you see the bigger picture of what’s happening here? Is the emperor wearing clothes?



      Take a minute and think about this situation. What would you say to the kiai master? What would you say to the students? What would you expect their replies to be? Remember that they have never seen the kiai master be defeated, and they can show you the videos of his magical abilities. How could you settle the difference of opinion? How could you dissent from the opinion of so many students? What arrogance, to suggest they are all deluded!

      Suppose the kiai master invited you join his dojo and learn magical powers, for a reasonable fee? How would you respond?

      As an aside, I’d like to mention an even more interesting aspect of the story. You would think that after the master’s humiliating defeat, the students would have left. But no, this didn’t happen. The students stayed on, found all manner of excuses for why the master was defeated, and continued to study the magical kiai powers. Their faith didn't waver, despite contrary evidence.

      Now for the final reflection: think about what you’d say to the kiai students regarding their delusion. If they said the same kind of thing to you regarding one of your beliefs, could you give a better response than they can? I encourage you to seriously ponder this. Chances are, you and I both have some beliefs that aren’t true."


      I keep wanting to post on this, because I have 38 years of serious Kung Fu training.
      The ability to hit very hard over minimal distance is called Fa Jin in Chinese. It's all mechanical. Nothing mysterious, or mystical about it.

      You create momentum in the center of your body, it transfers to the end of a limb, and you end up with a very powerful blow, without much apparent movement.

      Great boxers know some of this. Muhammad Ali used it. It was obvious in his body movements. High end Tai Chi adepts have this ability. It uses momentum, not muscle.

      An expert can lay the palm of their hand on a big man's chest, and drop him with almost no movement, and no distance between the palm and the "opponent's" body. The better you are, the less movement is seen.

      To the uninitiated, it looks like magic. And some Kung Fu masters play on that. But the guy in this video? That's not what he's doing. He's delusional.

      At one point, he may have had real skills, but he confused "students playing along"...with real skill. There is a huge amount of superstition and nonsense in Kung Fu. Less of that in Karate. None in MMA. None in Boxing.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kurt
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Thanks so much for posting the link. The article is so dead on accurate, I wanted to post it in it's entirety.

        Enjoy....


        "Here are some observations:
        The kiai master was genuine in his belief that he was an unbeatable fighter. He was so certain that he put his money, health, and reputation publicly on the line. That is the genuine faith of a sure man.
        "Everyone has a plan 'till they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson
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        • Profile picture of the author bravo75
          Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

          "Everyone has a plan 'till they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson
          Aww, did Mike say that? God bless his little soul.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    I'd never heard of Kiai so I had to goog it.
    From Reiki to self-defense, the idea of "chi" has always been interesting.

    When growing up, I loved the Kung Fu TV shows with David Carradine
    and the Kiai master video reminded me of those shows. But, of course that was
    television, so I'm not surprised there's a psych element to it. And, probably
    some politeness from the Master's students.

    Dan
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    "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
    Well, hell. I was expecting an homage to the band/webcomic, "Pictures of You."
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    Stop by Paul's Pub - my little hangout on Facebook.

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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew Shelton
    I love how they actually scientifically measured it with the crash test dummy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Last night I watched 'Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight' on HBO. It had archival footage of Ali in action. Again, a thing of beauty to watch.

      I've never seen, in boxing or martial arts, the timing and snap on a punch like Ali could throw. There have been far tougher men, but a technician? Never have I seen his equal.

      When he throws a jab, his body is doing 1,000 things, all to create immense force at the tip of that punch.
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      • Profile picture of the author bravo75
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Last night I watched ‘Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight’ on HBO. It had archival footage of Ali in action. Again, a thing of beauty to watch.

        I've never seen, in boxing or martial arts, the timing and snap on a punch like Ali could throw. There have been far tougher men, but a technician? Never have I seen his equal.

        When he throws a jab, his body is doing 1,000 things, all to create immense force at the tip of that punch.
        You notice the body movement of Ali sometimes. He sort of rolls with the rhythm of his opponent.

        He demonstrates this clearly in the Ali/Foreman fight in round 5. He uses his opponents force and movement against him. He lets him come on and counters his body movement and rhythm by mimicking, flowing with the movement.

        By applying this tactic, he was able to find openings in his opponent that other pugilists simply weren't able to do.

        The phantom punch that felled Sonny Liston was also testimonial to this style of fighting. Catching the opponent by using his own body movement against him and finding an opening while the opponent is in the midst of an evasive motion. Leaves a fighter very vulnerable and Ali was a master of exploiting this vulnerability in fighters.

        This is actually more akin to aikido than boxing. You can't teach kids to fight like this, this is a gift.

        There is another fighter that applies similar tactics seemingly effortlessly and that is Manny Pacquiao. Manny is more of a martial artist than a boxer in my eyes.
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