50 Years Ago Today The World Mourned

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One of the worst days the country has ever had to deal with, my parents were big fans of the president. They still have newspapers of that day and look at them often.
#worst days
  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    It was definitely the day when the bubble burst - Not so much about who the president was but just the fact that it happened and all the conspiracy surrounding it.

    It definitely was a game changer.
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  • Profile picture of the author ConfusedJ
    Today is also the 50th anniversary of the death of the legendary C.S. Lewis, who was a much brighter man, and a much more positive influence on society, than any Kennedy.

    R.I.P., Mr. Lewis.
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    • Profile picture of the author KimW
      Originally Posted by ConfusedJ View Post

      Today is also the 50th anniversary of the death of the legendary C.S. Lewis, who was a much brighter man, and a much more positive influence on society, than any Kennedy.

      R.I.P., Mr. Lewis.
      As your name implies,you are clearly confused.
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        Kim,

        If I am correctly informed, CS Lewis, JFK, and Aldous Huxley died within the same hour. The very next day, Dr. Who was introduced to the world.

        Why is there no investigation into what is obviously a vast international conspiracy to hide the presence of aliens in our entertainment complex???

        Sorry... Eye wur kornfewzedd.


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      • Profile picture of the author ConfusedJ
        Originally Posted by KimW View Post

        As your name implies,you are clearly confused.
        The Kennedy's were, and still are, overrated white trash with money.
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        • Profile picture of the author KimW
          Originally Posted by ConfusedJ View Post

          The Kennedy's were, and still are, overrated white trash with money.

          I take it back, you are beyond confused.

          While you may want to lump them all together, this thread was about one Kennedy. JFK.

          Who was one of the greatest presidents this country has had.

          For you to enter this thread to trash him and his family is beyond bad taste.

          My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.

          John F. Kennedy

          Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.

          John F. Kennedy
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          • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
            Kim,

            Tsk. Do we have to re-post the "Please do not feed the trolls" sign?


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            • Profile picture of the author KimW
              Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

              Kim,

              Tsk. Do we have to re-post the "Please do not feed the trolls" sign?


              Paul

              Sorry Paul.
              Momentary Dementia seems to set in more frequently these days.
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  • Profile picture of the author marketingva
    I was three and I clearly remember being very frightened because my mother was screaming and crying. Thank goodness my father soon arrived home. General Motors closed for the day and sent everyone home. My mother was inconsolable.

    Bonnie
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by marketingva View Post

      I was three and I clearly remember being very frightened because my mother was screaming and crying. Thank goodness my father soon arrived home. General Motors closed for the day and sent everyone home. My mother was inconsolable.

      Bonnie
      I was seven. In school. Our teacher cried. We all cried. Although I'm not sure the kids really knew why.

      To many, Kennedy was a Rock Star. And, as further posts alluded to...maybe our memory is changed because he died young.

      I have noticed that celebrities and leaders that die younger, seem to be thought of in a more "pure" light.

      Had Elvis survived into old age...would he still be "The King"?

      Yeah, we do seem to attack the best of us.
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      I remember that day clearly. I think the most compelling thing of all was hearing Cronkite's voice crack when he finally announced that President John F. Kennedy was dead. Even at the ripe old age of 5, that was clearly "Significant."

      If you weren't around in the early 60s, you might not get why that was a big deal. Uncle Walter was our rock back then. "The most trusted man in America."

      Seriously. A network newsman earned that title. If you wonder why the older denizens of OT are so hard on the modern media, it's because we grew up with giants like Chet Huntley, David Brinkley, and Walter Cronkite. We know what the news could be.

      I remember the nastiness when Kennedy was running. "A Catholic as President? That's crazy. Why, they'll end up moving the Vatican to Washington, DC!"

      Yes. Really. That was one of the arguments against his candidacy.

      Kennedy was a lot like Truman, in one important way. He rose to the job when he sat in the chair. He was a much better President than anyone who knew him ever expected.

      We haven't had a President since who could inspire people the way he could.


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      • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
        Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

        We haven't had a President since who could inspire people the way he could.
        There hasn't been a President, Prime Minister or King - anywhere, who had the charisma and appeal that JFK had.

        And as you said, none have risen to the job like he did either.
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        Arguing with an idiot is like playing chess with a pigeon.
        It'll just knock over all the pieces, poop on the board, and strut about like it's won anyway.
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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          There hasn't been a President, Prime Minister or King - anywhere, who had the charisma and appeal that JFK had.
          I don't know about that. Thatcher was close, if not right up there. And even at the age of 95, Mandela can inspire people in ways that most politicians can only dream of. Indira Gandhi was similarly brilliant.

          Bhutto tried, and I believe she had the charisma and character, but she was robbed of the opportunity.

          I don't think we lack for great leaders so much as constituents with vision.


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          • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
            Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

            I don't know about that. Thatcher was close, if not right up there. And even at the age of 95, Mandela can inspire people in ways that most politicians can only dream of. Indira Gandhi was similarly brilliant.

            Bhutto tried, and I believe she had the charisma and character, but she was robbed of the opportunity.

            I don't think we lack for great leaders so much as constituents with vision.

            Paul
            I'll grant you Mandela, as well as Ghandi (both Indira and Mahatmas) and Bhutto.

            Thatcher though, remains a divisive figure even after her death, and let's not forget that she was removed from office by her own party because of how unpopular she, or at least her policies, were.
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            • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
              Thatcher though, remains a divisive figure even after her death
              It's interesting that you'll grant me the two who were assassinated (Gandhi and Bhutto), or very likely to be (Mandela), and hold back the one who was left to live out her days (Maggie Thatcher).

              This is consistent with the tendency humans have of dealing harshly with our best and brightest.

              This isn't a shot, by the way. Just an observation about our proclivities as a species. As Richard Bach pointed out, we are not kind to our saviors...


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              • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
                Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

                It's interesting that you'll grant me the two who were assassinated (Gandhi and Bhutto), or very likely to be (Mandela), and hold back the one who was left to live out her days (Maggie Thatcher).

                This is consistent with the tendency humans have of dealing harshly with our best and brightest.

                This isn't a shot, by the way. Just an observation about our proclivities as a species. As Richard Bach pointed out, we are not kind to our saviors...


                Paul
                An interesting observation.

                Perhaps we tend to look upon someone who was taken from us before their time in a better light than someone who merely wears out their welcome.
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                • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
                  Perhaps we tend to look upon someone who was taken from us before their time in a better light than someone who merely wears out their welcome.
                  Almost certainly true, and a useful observation. Thank you.

                  That is different, though, from the habit we have of just killing off our most positive visionaries.

                  Historically speaking, it is relatively safe to be an outlier. It's okay to "defy" convention, as long as you don't successfully challenge it.


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                • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
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                  Originally Posted by whateverpedia View Post

                  Perhaps we tend to look upon someone who was taken from us before their time in a better light than someone who merely wears out their welcome.
                  I empathize. As a child, I never quite got over Bill and Ben being pulled from the TV schedules.
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  • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
    I remember the missile crisis and the assassination and I was only 5 or 6 at the time.

    Both times my cartoons were interrupted.

    I'm sure glad JFK handled the missile crisis the way he did and prevented the mad men from blowing up the world.
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    • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
      Originally Posted by TLTheLiberator View Post

      I'm sure glad JFK handled the missile crisis the way he did and prevented the mad men from blowing up the world.
      If I recall correctly*, Kruschev faced a similar predicament with his own hard line military advisers. They wanted war, and he was fully aware of what that would entail.

      So JFK, his brother RJK, as well as Kruschev all played a major part in defusing the situation, not JFK alone.

      *My memory of that event was formed long after the event, as I was actually born the day after the crisis ended.

      Obviously as well, as I was 12 months old (plus a few weeks) at the time of JFK's murder, I've no idea what I was doing at the time.
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  • Profile picture of the author KimW
    I was 9 years old and in the 4th grade.
    An announcement came over the loudspeaker system that the president had been assasinated.
    Most of us had no idea what that meant, but my Teacher, Mrs Anderson broke out in tears and the announcemnet continued to say that the rest of the school day was cancelled. We were all dismissed.

    There are less than a handful of such days that I remember as vividly.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Maschke
      Originally Posted by KimW View Post

      I was 9 years old and in the 4th grade.
      An announcement came over the loudspeaker system that the president had been assasinated.
      Most of us had no idea what that meant, but my Teacher, Mrs Anderson broke out in tears and the announcemnet continued to say that the rest of the school day was cancelled. We were all dismissed.

      There are less than a handful of such days that I remember as vividly.
      JFK was before my time, so I have to ask others what it was like.

      One fellow at work said everything came to a stop. Schools were closed, kids sent home and they weren't told why. They were told their parents would explain it when they got home.

      Also, he said the 911 attacks were nothing compared to the JFK assassination, as far as the impact it had on people anyway.

      I was quite shocked. People really never go into details like that when talking about what it was like that day.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kurt
        Originally Posted by David Maschke View Post

        JFK was before my time, so I have to ask others what it was like.

        One fellow at work said everything came to a stop. Schools were closed, kids sent home and they weren't told why. They were told their parents would explain it when they got home.

        Also, he said the 911 attacks were nothing compared to the JFK assassination, as far as the impact it had on people anyway.

        I was quite shocked. People really never go into details like that when talking about what it was like that day.
        The day after JFK was killed was the only time in Las Vegas history that the Strip casinos closed.
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        • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
          Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

          The day after JFK was killed was the only time in Las Vegas history that the Strip casinos closed.

          But the mighty NFL did not postpone or cancel its games that following Sunday and received a lot of criticism.
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  • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
    I love his inauguration speech.
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    • Profile picture of the author whateverpedia
      Originally Posted by TLTheLiberator View Post

      I love his inauguration speech.
      His final speech, which was never delivered, is also worth a read.

      Trade Mart Speech, 1963 . JFK . WGBH American Experience | PBS
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      David,
      Also, he said the 911 attacks were nothing compared to the JFK assassination, as far as the impact it had on people anyway.
      That's probably true for a lot of folks. It's hard for most of us to identify with such large numbers of victims as individuals. I wouldn't say it was less of an impact, by any means, but it was different.

      Kennedy had a charisma that made people feel a connection with him. After FDR, Truman, and Ike, he was a very different sort of President. That was part of the "Camelot" mythology, and made the assassination much more immediate and personal.

      To put it in perspective, consider that most of the nation thought of JFK as "Jack." And you can't imagine the heartbreak so many people felt watching John Jr salute his father's casket as the caisson passed.

      Very different indeed.


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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Well, I was still too young to have really looked at anything JFK did when he did it, but from most of what I have heard, and what I saw him say recently, I think he probably had wide appeal. I might have voted for him. And he won the popular vote by .1%, or about 120K votes.

    I have heard SO many rumors about what his plans were, etc.... I wonder if ANY were true. Some would have changed the US for the better. A few conspiracy theories say that he was killed because they would ALSO limit the government's power.

    As for the part about being catholic, there were a LOT of catholics! They were NOT looked down on. HECK, probably better than half of Massachusetts was catholic, and he was from there. Of course, historically, there HAS been a profile of the president, and catholic was about the only way that JFK violated that. The profile called for a protestant. But Catholics, Atheists, Jewish people, etc... voted for protestants. Some protestants think little of other protestants but STILL don't care enough to hurt an election. HECK, ROMNEY was a MORMON, and people still considered HIM a viable candidate!

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Steve,
      As for the part about being catholic, there were a LOT of catholics! They were NOT looked down on.
      Wow. You never tire of insisting on things you don't know about, do you?

      It's not talked about a lot in the history of American electoral politics, but Catholics weren't trusted politically in a lot of the country at that time. The Pope was too much like a religious dictator for the taste of many people in the US back then.

      I was raised Catholic, and was very active in our parish. I heard all about it.

      As far as how things are now... what does that have to do with it? When Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he famously remarked that Democrats were signing away the South for 50 years. He was, if anything, a bit on the conservative side with that projection. Not much, I think, but a bit.
      historically, there HAS been a profile of the president, and catholic was about the only way that JFK violated that.
      How about age? At 43, Kennedy was the second youngest President to be elected in US history.

      FDR? 51.
      Truman? 60.
      Eisenhower? 62.

      The age range over all of the American Presidents at the time they took office spanned from 42 (Theodore Roosevelt) to 69 (Ronald Reagan). JFK was very near the low end of that range.

      Kennedy took office from a predecessor (Ike) who was nearly 30 years his senior, an incredibly distinguished man, and someone the entire world trusted. (I suspect that even our enemies could have been persuaded to wear an "I Like Ike" button.)

      Kennedy's age was a huge issue in the campaign. The only way he got past that was having served 2 terms as a US Senator, and his military service. Even then, it was a near thing for many people.

      Then there was the source of Daddy's money - bootlegging - and Joe Sr's known connections to organized crime.

      JFK was well outside the "usual" parameters for a US Presidential candidate at the time he ran. He won based on two things: Joe's money and his own charisma. Once he was in office, though, the rest was on him. And his personal leadership ability was something special.

      It was John's vision, and not Joe's money, that put a man on the moon and brought him back home safely.


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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

        Steve,Wow. You never tire of insisting on things you don't know about, do you?

        It's not talked about a lot in the history of American electoral politics, but Catholics weren't trusted politically in a lot of the country at that time. The Pope was too much like a religious dictator for the taste of many people in the US back then.

        I was raised Catholic, and was very active in our parish. I heard all about it.
        Well, my mother was catholic and tried raising me so. As kurt's quote of jacke said, some, and probably MOST, catholics weren't that attentive to what the pope wanted. HECK, I don't even think my mother followed the dietary dictates, etc...

        And there WERE a lot of catholics. BESIDES, many protestants ALSO aren't that pious. And catholics are probably more likely to vote for the catholic.

        As far as how things are now... what does that have to do with it? When Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he famously remarked that Democrats were signing away the South for 50 years. He was, if anything, a bit on the conservative side with that projection. Not much, I think, but a bit.
        I wasn't talking about THAT. I was talking about things like the gold standard. As I said, I don't know if ANY of those rumors were true, let alone which ones. ALSO, it is said he was going to withdraw from vietnam.

        How about age? At 43, Kennedy was the second youngest President to be elected in US history. Kennedy's age was a huge issue in the campaign.
        Well, that still isn't violating it, but I never heard that was a problem.

        The only way he got past that was having served 2 terms as a US Senator, and his military service. Even then, it was a near thing for many people.
        Well, it seems MOST presidents go the route of "public service", often as a representative, senator or leader of some sort. That might be a good question for a quiz show. "Who was the last president that wasn't a vice president, governor, senator, or representative at some time before he was first elected as president?" Granted, MANY have tried to break that pattern. Some got CLOSE! But I can't remember the last to succeed, not that I have really been watching. I DID spot check some I wasn't sure of though. MOST were governors.

        Then there was the source of Daddy's money - bootlegging - and Joe Sr's known connections to organized crime.
        Yeah, I wouldn't have even thought talking about that here would be allowed. One wonders how rich they would be without prohibition. But I WISH that meant much in presidential elections. At least one senator was publicly accused of murder and a coverup, and there was evidence, yet he kept getting reelected.

        Steve
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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          Ken,
          The walking dead in Chicago had a little to do with his election.
          Quite possibly.

          I'm not convinced Nixon's campaign was all that clean, for that matter.

          We could get into the whole "Daley as a crook"/Chicago Machine thing, or the Teamsters connection, but that would step right over the line into real politics. No way that would stay civil for long.

          Too much of that is still going on to categorize it as history...

          Steve,
          As kurt's quote of jacke said, some, and probably MOST, catholics weren't that attentive to what the pope wanted.
          Possibly true. Even if it were, that didn't have much impact on what the anti-Catholic crowd thought.
          I wouldn't have even thought talking about that here would be allowed.
          Why? It's not political in any sense, and it's historical fact. Even the family doesn't deny it, as far as I've ever heard. They mostly just didn't talk about it.


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          • Profile picture of the author seasoned
            Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

            Why? It's not political in any sense, and it's historical fact. Even the family doesn't deny it, as far as I've ever heard. They mostly just didn't talk about it.
            Simply because it doesn't sound good, and is tied to a political figure. Yeah, they couldn't really deny it. So far as I know, the family got most of the money through three different paths. The first path, that certainly made the others possible, is I think the money from the bootlegging. People went to INCREDIBLE lengths to get booze, and it was illegal, so I am sure it cost a veritable FORTUNE.

            Steve
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            • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
              Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

              Simply because it doesn't sound good, and is tied to a political figure. Yeah, they couldn't really deny it. So far as I know, the family got most of the money through three different paths. The first path, that certainly made the others possible, is I think the money from the bootlegging. People went to INCREDIBLE lengths to get booze, and it was illegal, so I am sure it cost a veritable FORTUNE.

              Steve
              At one time Dad had the smallest bank in the USA.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Jackie had a great line about JFK being catholic. She said something like, "I don't know why people make such a big deal about Jack being catholic. He's so bad at it."
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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    I remember the day he died. I was in school and they sent us home early. I came home and my mother had one of her regular migraines and was in bed, so she wasn't aware. I hated to have to tell her with a migraine and all.

    JFK did what no other before him had done. He inspired the young to give a damn about politics. Had it been many of the before or after presidents, I would have thought nothing more about it except that it was cool to get out of school early. But not with JFK. He was the first president that made me care about politics. The first one that inspired me. After he died, I went back to not giving a damn about politics for a long time.
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