Giant 3D Printer Makes 10 Full Sized Houses In A Day!

by lanfear63 28 replies
BBC News - China: Firm 3D prints 10 full-sized houses in a day

Made in China so I expect they will be selling them in the larger Walmart stores. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

    BBC News - China: Firm 3D prints 10 full-sized houses in a day

    Made in China so I expect they will be selling them in the larger Walmart stores. :-)

    subject line should read Houses :-(
    I read about this recently...what makes it even cooler is that the 3D printer uses recycled materials such as concrete, so the homes are environmentally friendly.

    The bad news is, even more jobs will be lost in the future.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      First I've heard of this - it's amazing.
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
      Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

      The bad news is, even more jobs will be lost in the future.
      True, but progress requires change.
      And the good news is, the jobs created for people to design,
      manufacture, and maintain the printers will likely be higher paying?

      We just need to check the bottom of our houses to make sure that
      they weren't Made in China.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kurt
        Originally Posted by MikeTucker View Post

        True, but progress requires change.
        And the good news is, the jobs created for people to design,
        manufacture, and maintain the printers will likely be higher paying?

        We just need to check the bottom of our houses to make sure that
        they weren't Made in China.
        Hi Mike,

        This is part of a bigger problem, IMO. A recent report by Oxford University says that 49% of all jobs in the USA could be replaced by automation, robots and computer programs.

        How would any economy survive if half its jobs were eliminated?

        On the other hand, isn't the goal of automation to reduce our time spent working and give us more leisure and family time?

        Can automation make things so inexpensive that we don't have to work as much and still have a higher standard of living while having a viable economy? This should probably be the goal, just not sure it's possible.
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        • Profile picture of the author wahkeo
          Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

          Hi Mike,

          This is part of a bigger problem, IMO. A recent report by Oxford University says that 49% of all jobs in the USA could be replaced by automation, robots and computer programs.

          How would any economy survive if half its jobs were eliminated?

          On the other hand, isn't the goal of automation to reduce our time spent working and give us more leisure and family time?

          Can automation make things so inexpensive that we don't have to work as much and still have a higher standard of living while having a viable economy? This should probably be the goal, just not sure it's possible.
          Then I guess the only job is to operate the machine if automation will be the one to reduce working hours. The only big problem is, if they will imply that, then the companies would have to pay the operators a high sum of pay especially since so many people work their butt off just so they can pay bills after bills after bills. That's just my opinion tho. =p
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        • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
          Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

          Hi Mike,

          This is part of a bigger problem, IMO. A recent report by Oxford University says that 49% of all jobs in the USA could be replaced by automation, robots and computer programs.

          How would any economy survive if half its jobs were eliminated?

          On the other hand, isn't the goal of automation to reduce our time spent working and give us more leisure and family time?

          Can automation make things so inexpensive that we don't have to work as much and still have a higher standard of living while having a viable economy? This should probably be the goal, just not sure it's possible.
          Possible yes, probable no?
          Far too many people have far too much to lose if money loses power?

          Zero-Cost Economy - A blueprint to create general economic security in a Carefree economy

          And another consideration is that these printers tend to give-off
          a lot of harmful chemical vapors... If and when they become as
          common as computers, it could have devastating effects on the
          health of millions of people, who will not read the instructions any more
          than they do for pesticides-- or website Terms & Conditions?
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          • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
            Originally Posted by MikeTucker View Post

            Possible yes, probable no?
            <snip>

            And another consideration is that these printers tend to give-off
            a lot of harmful chemical vapors... If and when they become as
            common as computers, it could have devastating effects on the
            health of millions of people, who will not read the instructions any more
            than they do for pesticides-- or website Terms & Conditions?
            That could lead to a new industry for industrial-strength home-use air filters (or 3D printers to print them out).
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          • Profile picture of the author Kurt
            Originally Posted by MikeTucker View Post

            Possible yes, probable no?
            Far too many people have far too much to lose if money loses power?

            Zero-Cost Economy - A blueprint to create general economic security in a Carefree economy

            And another consideration is that these printers tend to give-off
            a lot of harmful chemical vapors... If and when they become as
            common as computers, it could have devastating effects on the
            health of millions of people, who will not read the instructions any more
            than they do for pesticides-- or website Terms & Conditions?
            50% may not be probable, but what about 25%? How about 15%? And what if new advancements are made and the 50% becomes 70%?
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            • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
              Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post

              I think an assembly line of 3D printers -- both giant and small -- that print different kinds of material would be required for a skyscraper. There are 3D printers for many kinds of materials nowadays, and it is really only just beginning. If this could be done with waste-products, that would be amazing. Has there ever been a science fiction story in which construction workers have become obsolete?

              He brought up legitimate questions, based on the information provided with regards to constructing skycrapers. It is by exploring such question that viable solutions and innovations can be arrived at.
              The "Shape of Things to Come" got close! That H.G. Wells film showed us what we could achieve if we ditched borders and money!

              And constructed skyscrapers quickly by putting 10 story walls up using a giant machine!


              Shane
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

          Hi Mike,

          This is part of a bigger problem, IMO. A recent report by Oxford University says that 49% of all jobs in the USA could be replaced by automation, robots and computer programs.
          Kurt. They will be replaced by jobs doing something else.

          I see it as a huge move forward. And a new need for other services, that we haven't even thought of yet.

          And this technology will spin off other technologies that will require trained technicians.

          I believe this for to reasons;

          That's the way it's always worked out in the past.
          The alternative is unacceptable. (to me at least)
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          • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Kurt. They will be replaced by jobs doing something else.

            I see it as a huge move forward. And a new need for other services, that we haven't even thought of yet.

            And this technology will spin off other technologies that will require trained technicians.

            I believe this for to reasons;

            That's the way it's always worked out in the past.
            The alternative is unacceptable. (to me at least)
            Exactly, and that's why Pimping (a noble and time honored profession) makes sense. It is immune from any possible scenario as Kurt suggested and why we continue to do it.
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Well, cement isn't THAT good! 1 story, maybe 2 or 3, OK. But SKYSCRAPERS? Better think of having OTHER things as well. ALSO, there have to be allowances made for electricity, gas, water, airconditioning, etc.... What they show in the pictures appear to be nothing more than simple shelters.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

      Well, cement isn't THAT good! 1 story, maybe 2 or 3, OK. But SKYSCRAPERS? Better think of having OTHER things as well. ALSO, there have to be allowances made for electricity, gas, water, airconditioning, etc.... What they show in the pictures appear to be nothing more than simple shelters.

      Steve
      Why do you always seem to diminish posts made by others? You always post about what you find wrong with something, and rarely about the postives of the posts.

      BTW, using recycled concrete is a very big deal for the environment.

      If you did a little research you'd find that these buildings are designed to easily allow for electrical, windows and plumbing systems, etc. to be added after the main structure has been created.
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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

      Well, cement isn't THAT good! 1 story, maybe 2 or 3, OK. But SKYSCRAPERS? Better think of having OTHER things as well. ALSO, there have to be allowances made for electricity, gas, water, airconditioning, etc.... What they show in the pictures appear to be nothing more than simple shelters.

      Steve
      I think an assembly line of 3D printers -- both giant and small -- that print different kinds of material would be required for a skyscraper. There are 3D printers for many kinds of materials nowadays, and it is really only just beginning. If this could be done with waste-products, that would be amazing. Has there ever been a science fiction story in which construction workers have become obsolete?

      Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

      Why do you always seem to diminish posts made by others? You always post about what you find wrong with something, and rarely about the postives of the posts.

      BTW, using recycled concrete is a very big deal for the environment.

      If you did a little research you'd find that these buildings are designed to easily allow for electrical, windows and plumbing systems, etc. to be added after the main structure has been created.
      He brought up legitimate questions, based on the information provided with regards to constructing skycrapers. It is by exploring such question that viable solutions and innovations can be arrived at.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kurt
        Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post


        He brought up legitimate questions, based on the information provided with regards to constructing skycrapers. It is by exploring such question that viable solutions and innovations can be arrived at.
        My comments weren't limited to this single post of his. There's a definite trend of negativity from seasoned with many posts that he doesn't make. You say he's curious. I say it's a need to put things down and try to find what's wrong with something.

        There's ways to ask questions that don't have the negative connotation seasoned often uses. So sorry, I don't agree with your opinion. He could have easily asked "I wonder why?". There's plenty of ways to have curiosity without putting things down. I highly doubt you use seasoned's approach with your son.

        He didn't just comment about skyscrapers. I answered his other concerns, in case you missed it.
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        • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
          Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

          My comments weren't limited to this single post of his. There's a definite trend of negativity from seasoned with many posts that he doesn't make. You say he's curious. I say it's a need to put things down and try to find what's wrong with something.

          There's ways to ask questions that don't have the negative connotation seasoned often uses. So sorry, I don't agree with your opinion. He could have easily asked "I wonder why?". There's plenty of ways to have curiosity without putting things down. I highly doubt you use seasoned's approach with your son.

          He didn't just comment about skyscrapers. I answered his other concerns, in case you missed it.
          I've noticed long and sustained trend of you putting down Seasoned. He often presents details to back-up his stances, not just flinging ad hominems like a monkey flinging feces. Why don't you just leave him alone? If he's a contrarian of sorts, that's his right. Contrarians have a useful place in society as well.
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          • Profile picture of the author Kurt
            Originally Posted by thunderbird View Post

            I've noticed long and sustained trend of you putting down Seasoned. He often presents details to back-up his stances, not just flinging ad hominems like a monkey flinging feces. Why don't you just leave him alone? If he's a contrarian of sorts, that's his right. Contrarians have a useful place in society as well.

            I think a better question is why seasoned has to have such a negative attitude towards other posts and ideas that aren't his? One can be a contrarian without being negative, so let's focus on the logical fallacy of being "non-sequitor".

            However, saying things like "What they show in the pictures appear to be nothing more than simple shelters" about a wonderful advancement isn't contrarian, it's negative. It's a put down of the system, an attempt to minimalize the achievement. It's the system that is cool, and as a prototype, the output will only get better.

            I read the same post he did. I had some of the same questions he had. I took 5 minutes and used Google and found the answers. Going by his comments, he seemed to assume that electricity and plumbing weren't planned for. A little more research would show that they are being accounted for.

            Plus, tell a homeless person that these structures are "nothing more than...".

            To answser your question directly, my hope is that seasoned will realize that he doesn't need to put things down to build himself up and that it has the opposite affect in some of us. Believe it or not, it could actually helpful for him to realize that some of us would have greater respect for him if he showed greater respect for ideas, topics and posts he doesn't make. It's OK to say something is "good" or "cool" once in a while to balance things out. And this is a cool idea.

            Seasoned is very helpful when it comes to computer and tech problems. However, his negativity about other matters not only potentially discourages some from making posts, it hurts him as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author wahkeo
    Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

    BBC News - China: Firm 3D prints 10 full-sized houses in a day

    Made in China so I expect they will be selling them in the larger Walmart stores. :-)

    subject line should read Houses :-(
    if these will be implemented in the United States, I hope they won't cost too much.

    There's a possibility that people might lose their jobs because of this, but I doubt it. It might cost too much to use such printer.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Good luck not having any rebar in those concrete walls.
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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by yukon View Post

      Good luck not having any rebar in those concrete walls.
      I wonder how many kinds of materials a single giant 3D printer could be made to print out. It would involve switching cartridges and printing heads I guess.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    I'm thinking the shipping cost would be more than the value of the house so I seriously doubt China will be 3D printing houses that are sold in the US.

    Even If they sold a machine to print the houses it wouldn't pass building codes in the US.
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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by yukon View Post

      I'm thinking the shipping cost would be more than the value of the house so I seriously doubt China will be 3D printing houses that are sold in the US.

      Even If they sold a machine to print the houses it wouldn't pass building codes in the US.
      Right now it probably wouldn't, but could 3D printing systems be developed that meet building code requirements? It is still early in their development. I had the impression that you were once involved in developing 3D printing software?
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    I'm looking at the size and figuring that unless many were linked together they wouldn't make a full home - other than the new "tiny homes" that have become trendy with minimalists. But....there's already companies here that sell structures of that size for office buildings, shops, etc. -- more or less little mobile units for people that need space, but not a full building.

    As far as jobs - recycling needs people to recycle. What if they make a move to make these things in hempcrete? Farmers needed. Farmers need farmhands, so we're looking at both technical and non-technical jobs. What concerns me is that our technology must make jobs for people with all levels of education. Not everyone can be a scholar. When you can get farmers/farmhands, recyclers, manufacturing all together on projects like this one, that's a good thing not a bad thing. The hazard of working around the machines if they are putting off some harmful waves of some sort is a concern - but if you ever have been where they are building your computer boards, or in a plastic injection plant, those are not one tad better for anyone. If it's a machine that can be programmed that will run on it's own after you push the button, you can put it in a "clean room" where the operator could watch through windows and control it from outside of the room. Other filters might be necessary, but it should be doable sustainably with the right tweaks. We just have to tell China to shove and build our own. Then, we should be doing that with a lot of things anyhow.
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  • Profile picture of the author ErinWalsh
    I think this is one of the better uses of a 3D printer I've seen. The top of the list is prosthetic limbs for amputees.

    If the 3D printer can make sturdy homes at low cost to the consumer, the poor in China may be able to afford homes. They're designed with the ability to add plumbing and electricity so I see no down side to these houses.
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    • Profile picture of the author thunderbird
      Originally Posted by ErinWalsh View Post

      I think this is one of the better uses of a 3D printer I've seen. The top of the list is prosthetic limbs for amputees.

      If the 3D printer can make sturdy homes at low cost to the consumer, the poor in China may be able to afford homes. They're designed with the ability to add plumbing and electricity so I see no down side to these houses.
      I don't have much of a clue what's going on in China, but I gather that there are a lot of empty developments there. Some predictions of these developments are dire, others say that these "ghost cities" will become "thriving metropolitan areas."
      Satellite Pictures Of Chinese Ghost Cities - Business Insider

      I don't know what the poor in China can afford, but the rich in China are buying up vast chunks of real estate in Vancouver. I recall how when I had to contact homeowners on well-to-do street in Vancouver, advising them of an impending film shoot on the street, I had to tell them in Mandarin more than in English because trying to talk to them in English was futile for a lot of them.

      What I do seem to be seeing is that China is becoming the world's hotspot for new inventions with practical applications, that has been the US's place for so long.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hightower
    After seeing the following post on facebook, I came here to do a search for 3D printing. Thank you lanfear63 for starting this thread.
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    'Made-In-China' Era
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    All the best,
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Blades
    What they show in the pictures appear to be nothing more than simple shelters.
    There are billions of people who would love to have just one of those simple shelters

    I remember growing up poor, worrying where we were going to live once our eviction notice was up. One of these shelters would have been a godsend
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    • Profile picture of the author Kurt
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Kurt. They will be replaced by jobs doing something else.

      I see it as a huge move forward. And a new need for other services, that we haven't even thought of yet.

      And this technology will spin off other technologies that will require trained technicians.

      I believe this for to reasons;

      That's the way it's always worked out in the past.
      The alternative is unacceptable. (to me at least)
      Logic 101 states that the past does not equal the future. Because it's "always worked out in the past", even if true, doesn't mean it always will.

      And because something is "unacceptable" isn't much of an argument either, and is unacceptable to me.

      It is also illogical to assume that because I pointed out some concerns that I don't support the tech.
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