I Guess American Snacks Are An Acquired Taste...

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Foreigners taste some of America's favs...


  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by TLTheLiberator View Post

    Foreigners taste some of America's favs...
    ]
    Interesting. It makes me wonder how many other things we accept, that other people just think is weird. It can probably apply to anything.


    Thanks for posting.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Interesting. It makes me wonder how many other things we accept, that other people just think is weird. It can probably apply to anything.


      Thanks for posting.
      There was an article recently (I tried to find it...no luck) that listed ten American foods the rest of the world found odd. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were on the list. Blew my mind.


      Edit: Not the actual article I read, but close:
      http://nutrition.answers.com/diets/1...n-apos-t-stand
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

        There was an article recently (I tried to find it...no luck) that listed ten American foods the rest of the world found odd. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were on the list. Blew my mind.
        Yesterday, I was at my Auto-Erotic Asphyxiation Addiction Support Group meeting.

        We had a speaker that said that in a few countries, what we did...several times a day...was considered strange. Man, we just couldn't believe that some people were so closed minded.

        He had more to say, but we were choking him, so we couldn't understand it.
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        • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          He had more to say, but we were choking him, so we couldn't understand it.
          Shouldn't he have been choking himself?
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

            Shouldn't he have been choking himself?
            I was thinking the exact same thing....


            He should be. And that is the entire point. Everyone should be.

            We were just showing him how.
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            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
              Banned
              Not sure whether I really believe that site or not ...

              I mean, ok, I've heard of "peanut butter and jelly" (who hasn't?). But "biscuits and gravy"?! This isn't seriously a "thing", is it? (And why aren't they called "cookies" instead of "biscuits", anyway??).

              .
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              • Profile picture of the author ThomM
                Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                Not sure whether I really believe that site or not ...

                I mean, ok, I've heard of "peanut butter and jelly" (who hasn't?). But "biscuits and gravy"?! This isn't seriously a "thing", is it? (And why aren't they called "cookies" instead of "biscuits", anyway??).

                .
                Biscuits and gravy is great. Start with real buttermilk biscuits.
                Our Best Buttermilk Biscuits - Southern Living
                The gravy has to be a sausage gravy, which to break down to it's base is breakfast sausage in a white sauce.
                Here's the reason we have different meaning for the word biscuit
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit
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                • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                  Originally Posted by ThomM View Post

                  Biscuits and gravy is great. Start with real buttermilk biscuits.
                  Our Best Buttermilk Biscuits - Southern Living
                  The gravy has to be a sausage gravy, which to break down to it's base is breakfast sausage in a white sauce.
                  Here's the reason we have different meaning for the word biscuit
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit
                  Man ... I can't believe Biscuits and Gravy would make the list or Peanut Butter & Jelly sandwiches for that matter, but in two lists I saw, I at least agree with about half of them.

                  One List here American Foods Foreigners Find Gross - Business Insider (highlighted the ones I actually love)

                  1. Velveeta Cheese
                  2. Hershey's Chocolate
                  3. Red Vines
                  4. Supermarket Bread
                  5. Casseroles
                  6. Root Beer Floats
                  7. Twizzlers
                  8. Pop Tarts
                  9. Snow Cones
                  10. Beef Jerky
                  11. Corn Dogs
                  12. Biscuits and Gravy
                  13. American Bacon
                  14. Meatloaf



                  Another List here is fairly similar, but has some differences (ones I love are bolded) 10 American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand - Do You Agree?
                  1. Red velvet cake - The food coloring is a turn off and many think it is tasteless. A chocolate or vanilla cake is much more liked.
                  2. Grocery store bread - Considered to be too sweet and does not remain fresh for long. There's nothing like a fresh, hot, loaf of french bread.
                  3. Biscuits and gravy - Maybe only us Southerners know how to appreciate this savory dish. Foreigners cannot stomach the thought of sausage, flour, and milk together.
                  4. Peanut butter and jelly sandwich - (This one made me say whhatttt?) Many foreigners do not understand why Americans love this well-known, kid-friendly sandwich so much. (Umm... because it's awesome).
                  5. Grits - The taste and consistency is thought to be odd.
                  6. Chocolate - American chocolate is considered processed, not sweet enough, and tastes old. (I would think our chocolate is too sweet, wouldn't you?)
                  7. Bacon and eggs - The greasy bacon with the eggs doesn't seem suitable for breakfast. In several other countries, breakfast normally consists of fresh fruit and light bread such as a croissant.
                  8. Spray cheese - (Ok, I can see how this one is disliked.) This imitation cheese is completely processed and untraditional.
                  9. Casseroles - Too much sodium and this kind of meal-in-one is considered unappetizing.
                  10. Cereal - Too much sugar, refined carbs, and lack of nutrition.
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                  • Profile picture of the author alistair
                    Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                    3. Biscuits and gravy



                    Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                    7. Bacon and eggs
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                    • Profile picture of the author ThomM
                      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                      Man ... I can't believe Biscuits and Gravy would make the list or Peanut Butter & Jelly sandwiches for that matter, but in two lists I saw, I at least agree with about half of them.

                      One List here American Foods Foreigners Find Gross - Business Insider (highlighted the ones I actually love)

                      1. Velveeta Cheese
                      2. Hershey's Chocolate
                      3. Red Vines
                      4. Supermarket Bread
                      5. Casseroles
                      6. Root Beer Floats
                      7. Twizzlers
                      8. Pop Tarts
                      9. Snow Cones
                      10. Beef Jerky
                      11. Corn Dogs
                      12. Biscuits and Gravy
                      13. American Bacon
                      14. Meatloaf



                      Another List here is fairly similar, but has some differences (ones I love are bolded) 10 American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand - Do You Agree?
                      1. Red velvet cake - The food coloring is a turn off and many think it is tasteless. A chocolate or vanilla cake is much more liked.
                      2. Grocery store bread - Considered to be too sweet and does not remain fresh for long. There's nothing like a fresh, hot, loaf of french bread.
                      3. Biscuits and gravy - Maybe only us Southerners know how to appreciate this savory dish. Foreigners cannot stomach the thought of sausage, flour, and milk together.
                      4. Peanut butter and jelly sandwich - (This one made me say whhatttt?) Many foreigners do not understand why Americans love this well-known, kid-friendly sandwich so much. (Umm... because it's awesome).
                      5. Grits - The taste and consistency is thought to be odd.
                      6. Chocolate - American chocolate is considered processed, not sweet enough, and tastes old. (I would think our chocolate is too sweet, wouldn't you?)
                      7. Bacon and eggs - The greasy bacon with the eggs doesn't seem suitable for breakfast. In several other countries, breakfast normally consists of fresh fruit and light bread such as a croissant.
                      8. Spray cheese - (Ok, I can see how this one is disliked.) This imitation cheese is completely processed and untraditional.
                      9. Casseroles - Too much sodium and this kind of meal-in-one is considered unappetizing.
                      10. Cereal - Too much sugar, refined carbs, and lack of nutrition.
                      The only one I disagree with you on is grits
                      Whenever I go south I plan my stops around Waffle Houses. I absolutely love their eggs and grits. What I do is get sunny side up eggs and then mash them into the grits.
                      Originally Posted by alistair View Post






                      Good more for us
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                      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                        Originally Posted by ThomM View Post

                        The only one I disagree with you on is grits
                        Whenever I go south I plan my stops around Waffle Houses. I absolutely love their eggs and grits. What I do is get sunny side up eggs and then mash them into the grits.
                        Yeah ... I actually do like grits, but it was an acquired taste, and I don't buy them for eating at home. I first had them in Mississippi. Went to breakfast and grits were served with everything and I said leave the grits off. They flat out refused and brought my breakfast with grits. So, I ate them. lol. I've had them several times since and I like them ... just never think of it as a grocery staple to buy for home.
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                        • Profile picture of the author ThomM
                          I'll get them for home once in a while, but they're not a staple.
                          Of course now that we're talking about them
                          There use to be a place in Tampa that had that attitude.
                          They took it to a (good) extreme though.
                          If you ordered ham and eggs you would get ham, eggs, toast, grits, biscuits and gravy, extra biscuits, extra sausage gravy, extra sausage, and a pot of coffee. I think the place was run by a southern lady who really believed in southern hospitality
                          Dinners there had the same (feed one person a meal for 4) theme as breakfasts. All home made cooking too.
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                          • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                            Originally Posted by ThomM View Post

                            There use to be a place in Tampa that had that attitude.
                            They took it to a (good) extreme though.
                            If you ordered ham and eggs you would get ham, eggs, toast, grits, biscuits and gravy, extra biscuits, extra sausage gravy, extra sausage, and a pot of coffee.
                            lol ... sounds good but like too much food. I had never even heard of grits when I had breakfast in MS, so when I asked what they were and she told me, they didn't sound good. When she refused to eliminate them, I thought about being mad for just a second ... then said ... nah ... what's it going to hurt to give this a try?
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                  • Profile picture of the author LynnM
                    Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                    Casseroles - Too much sodium and this kind of meal-in-one is considered unappetizing.
                    .
                    Aren't casseroles are a staple around the world? Think carbonnade, Irish stew, stifado, bourguignon, cassoulet, stroganoff, tagine etc.
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                    • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
                      Originally Posted by LynnM View Post

                      Aren't casseroles are a staple around the world? Think carbonnade, Irish stew, stifado, bourguignon, cassoulet, stroganoff, tagine etc.
                      Hi Lynn, I was wondering about casseroles too. Boiling things in water has been around all over the world for yonks in varying degree's.

                      In fact in Winter it's one of my favourite comfort meals though I do like replacing the water with red wine which basically makes it a bourguignon.
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                      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                        Originally Posted by Richard Van View Post

                        Hi Lynn, I was wondering about casseroles too. Boiling things in water has been around all over the world for yonks in varying degree's.

                        In fact in Winter it's one of my favourite comfort meals though I do like replacing the water with red wine which basically makes it a bourguignon.
                        Boiling things in water or wine ... I don't consider a casserole. Some traditional American style casseroles with be tuna casserole (noodles and tuna and sauce), where it's all baked together. A pot pie, which I love, would also be a casserole.

                        The New England Boiled Dinner (corned beef, cabbage, potatoes and carrots) is not a casserole. Roast beef with potatoes and carrots roasted in with it is not a casserole. Pork Roast with Sauerkraut is not a casserole.

                        American casseroles are usually, rice, potatoes or noodles with some kind of meat and sauce, all mixed together and baked, like these Casserole Recipes - Allrecipes.com
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                        • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                          Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                          Boiling things in water or wine ... I don't consider a casserole. Some traditional American style casseroles with be tuna casserole (noodles and tuna and sauce), where it's all baked together. A pot pie, which I love, would also be a casserole.

                          The New England Boiled Dinner (corned beef, cabbage, potatoes and carrots) is not a casserole. Roast beef with potatoes and carrots roasted in with it is not a casserole. Pork Roast with Sauerkraut is not a casserole.

                          American casseroles are usually, rice, potatoes or noodles with some kind of meat and sauce, all mixed together and baked, like these
                          Casserole Recipes - Allrecipes.com
                          I am officially hungry

                          I like everything you mentioned. My all time fav is roast beef, corned beef and cabbage ...
                          followed by tuna casserole ( which by all rights should be disgusting - but somehow isn't )
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                        • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
                          Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                          American casseroles are usually, rice, potatoes or noodles with some kind of meat and sauce, all mixed together and baked, like these Casserole Recipes - Allrecipes.com
                          Ahh, I see. Thanks. Still looks very nice though.

                          Here and I think most of Europe, France at least tend to very slowly simmer for several hours meat of some description and veg to your liking in water or wine or combination of. I tend to buy a nice French bread or crusty bread and have it with that.

                          The New England Boiled Dinner (corned beef, cabbage, potatoes and carrots) is not a casserole. Roast beef with potatoes and carrots roasted in with it is not a casserole. Pork Roast with Sauerkraut is not a casserole.
                          Same over here. The New England one looks more like a boiled roast dinner and the Roast beef and Pork sound like what we'd call a roast dinner. Not casserole's to me either. Here you eat the meat and veg still in the water/wine. This is a beef bourguignon.

                          Is that what you might call a stew? We sometimes refer to it as that too.

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                          • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                            Originally Posted by Richard Van View Post

                            Ahh, I see. Thanks. Still looks very nice though.

                            Here and I think most of Europe, France at least tend to very slowly simmer for several hours meat of some description and veg to your liking in water or wine or combination of. I tend to buy a nice French bread or crusty bread and have it with that.

                            Same over here. The New England one looks more like a boiled roast dinner and the Roast beef and Pork sound like what we'd call a roast dinner. Not casserole's to me either. Here you eat the meat and veg still in the water/wine. This is a beef bourguignon.

                            Is that what you might call a stew? We sometimes refer to it as that too.

                            To keep it simple, I call a bourguignon, bourguignon. It really is a distinctive meal unto itself. What I call stew would be any combination of meat and vegetables cooked in a thinner gravy (flour based) like chicken stew and beef stew or chicken and dumplings would be a stew if the chicken is cooked in a gravy. A Beef Stroganoff is cooked in a thickish sauce, but unlike a traditional gravy, it's base is sour cream and it's often served over rice or noodles, unlike a real stew, and since the noodles or rice is not cooked along with the meat and sauce, it wouldn't be a casserole either. I think of a stew as a thickish soup, served in a bowl
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                            • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
                              Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                              To keep it simple, I call a bourguignon, bourguignon. It really is a distinctive meal unto itself. What I call stew would be any combination of meat and vegetables cooked in a thinner gravy (flour based) like chicken stew and beef stew or chicken and dumplings would be a stew if the chicken is cooked in a gravy. A Beef Stroganoff is cooked in a thickish sauce, but unlike a traditional gravy, it's base is sour cream and it's often served over rice or noodles, unlike a real stew, and since the noodles or rice is not cooked along with the meat and sauce, it wouldn't be a casserole either. I think of a stew as a thickish soup, served in a bowl
                              Yes you're right, a bourguignon is exactly that. I think basically what we call a casserole, which can be any combination of meat and veg, is what you'd call and we also often call a stew. Like you say though there's a fine line between casseroles/stews and a thick soup.

                              Thinking about it I think I'm confused.

                              Oh who cares, they all taste jolly nice!
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                          • Profile picture of the author LynnM
                            Originally Posted by Richard Van View Post


                            Is that what you might call a stew? We sometimes refer to it as that too.

                            All the same to most of us, although according to Delia (national cooking treasure for those of you outside the UK), a stew is generally done on top of the cooker: Slow progress: Delia on casseroles - from Delia Online

                            I'm fairly familiar with US cooking terms, but had no idea a casserole meant something different to what the rest of the world considers it to be (or the UK at least).
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                            • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                              Originally Posted by LynnM View Post

                              I'm fairly familiar with US cooking terms, but had no idea a casserole meant something different to what the rest of the world considers it to be (or the UK at least).
                              Americans tend to think of casseroles as a put a bunch of sh&t in a pot and bake it all together. They are touted as the quick and easy meals for working mothers, etc. There's a lot of cheapo, crappy tasting, quick casserole instant mixes like Hamburger Helper kind of stuff, where you cook some macaroni, crumble up and cook some hamburger, add in that lousy Helper stuff and put in pot and bake. It's really awful.

                              There are a quite a few really good recipes for casseroles, but I think the American "fast and easy" box mix variety is awful.
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                              • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
                                Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                                Americans tend to think of casseroles as a put a bunch of sh&t in a pot and bake it all together. They are touted as the quick and easy meals for working mothers, etc. There's a lot of cheapo, crappy tasting, quick casserole instant mixes like Hamburger Helper kind of stuff, where you cook some macaroni, crumble up and cook some hamburger, add in that lousy Helper stuff and put in pot and bake. It's really awful.

                                There are a quite a few really good recipes for casseroles, but I think the American "fast and easy" box mix variety is awful.
                                That and the casserole recipes found on the back of some soups like cream of chicken. Can of tuna, cream of chicken soup, milk, can of peas, bake. Nasty!!


                                Terra
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                                • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                                  Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

                                  That and the casserole recipes found on the back of some soups like cream of chicken. Can of tuna, cream of chicken soup, milk, can of peas, bake. Nasty!!

                                  Terra
                                  Yeah. Throw a can Cream of Chicken or Cream of Mushroom soup over anything and bake it and it's a casserole. lol

                                  There is one that I do like. Brown chicken pieces, cover with Cream of Mushroom soup and bake. Serve over egg noodles. Really good.
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                                  • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
                                    Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                                    Yeah. Throw a can Cream of Chicken or Cream of Mushroom soup over anything and bake it and it's a casserole. lol

                                    There is one that I do like. Brown chicken pieces, cover with Cream of Mushroom soup and bake. Serve over egg noodles. Really good.

                                    Hmmm, maybe I'll try that next time the grandkiddies are over.


                                    Terra
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              • Profile picture of the author HeySal
                Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                Not sure whether I really believe that site or not ...

                I mean, ok, I've heard of "peanut butter and jelly" (who hasn't?). But "biscuits and gravy"?! This isn't seriously a "thing", is it? (And why aren't they called "cookies" instead of "biscuits", anyway??).

                .
                Cookies and biscuits over here are two different things.
                Cookies here are the sweet tasty treats. Biscuits are more of a yeastless bread. When you think of biscuits and gravy, your comparison would be Yorkshire pudding and gravy.

                When I was in Germany, we Americans often used jars of peanut butter for part of the rent money. That and booze. We'd get about 4 times what it cost at the commissary. I never used my liquor rations (10 bottles a month if I remember right), so I'd buy a couple bottles of Seagram's for $1.70 a bottle and get 20 marks for it as rent - and we traded peanut butter for 20 marks, too. Made our rent affordable for those of us who didn't get to live on base. The Germans were crazy about peanut butter.

                Now with all the chemical stuffing in our food and GMOs, I imagine none of it really tastes all that good to anyone else.
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                • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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                  Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

                  Cookies here are the sweet tasty treats. Biscuits are more of a yeastless bread. When you think of biscuits and gravy, your comparison would be Yorkshire pudding and gravy.
                  Ah, now that sounds a bit more plausible. Thank you, Sal - I was thinking of the sweet kind (what "biscuits" means over here) and wondering how anyone would put gravy on them.

                  Yes, Yorkshire pudding and gravy makes complete sense.
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                  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
                    Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                    Ah, now that sounds a bit more plausible. Thank you, Sal - I was thinking of the sweet kind (what "biscuits" means over here) and wondering how anyone would put gravy on them.

                    Yes, Yorkshire pudding and gravy makes complete sense.
                    Yeah, BISCUIT is a kind of false friend that makes british and American seem almost like two different languages at times. A biscuit can be doughy or flaky is generally soft, and has a consistent taste that can be kind of mildly sweet. They are used almost like a nice addition to a meal or even as a replacement for bread. Although they aren't bread, they can easily be used like bread. They are also generally round and relatively tall. Cookies tend to be bigger around and shorter and can be soft to somewhat hard, and are generally sweet. They are generally considered as a kind of dessert or treat.

                    You have to be careful sometimes. Ask for a chip in the US, and you generally WON'T get your standard pomme frites. HECK, ask for pomme fites(apparently a common term throughout europe), and most Americans will just say "HUH?"!

                    Steve
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                    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                      Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

                      Yeah, BISCUIT is a kind of false friend that makes british and American seem almost like two different languages at times. A biscuit can be doughy or flaky is generally soft, and has a consistent taste that can be kind of mildly sweet. They are used almost like a nice addition to a meal or even as a replacement for bread. Although they aren't bread, they can easily be used like bread.
                      TADA .... Biscuits and Gravy (often served with scrambled eggs)



                      Plain Southern Buttermilk Biscuits



                      ... and to add confusion, some people (not me) call this a biscuit. I call it a cookie.



                      Biscuit

                      Let's start with the biscuit. In the UK, your biscuit might be topped with chocolate or have currants in it. You might dip it in your cup of tea, or have one (or two or maybe three) as a snack after lunch. If you were in the US, however, you might put bacon and eggs on it or smother it in gravy and have it for breakfast. Or you might put a piece of chicken on it and have it for dinner.

                      Oxforddictionaries.com notes this difference, giving two definitions for the word. But how did these two very different meanings come to be? According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the word biscuit comes originally from the Latin biscotum (panem), which means bread 'twice baked', which would explain the hard, crunchy quality of a British biscuit. An American biscuit is more like what the Brits would call a scone (and an American scone is something else entirely), and the pronunciation is another matter entirely. It's unclear how these two different foods came to have the same word, and we can only speculate about the influence of the French language in the southern United States.
                      Cookie

                      The word cookie opens up a whole other can of worms. In the UK, a cookie is a soft, squishy, moist biscuit (for lack of a better word). British cookies tend to be bigger and more substantial than a British biscuit. In the US, a cookie covers both what the British would call a biscuit and a cookie. The word comes from the Dutch koekje, meaning 'little cake,' and could have been popularized in the US due to early Dutch colonization, though we don't know for sure.

                      So you've got it, right? A British biscuit is an American cookie and an American cookie is a British cookie and an American biscuit is a British scone and an American scone is something else entirely. Simple! Now, what would you like with your tea?

                      Biscuit vs. cookie: a transatlantic debate | OxfordWords blog
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                      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
                        Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                        TADA .... Biscuits and Gravy (often served with scrambled eggs)



                        Plain Southern Buttermilk Biscuits



                        ... and to add confusion, some people (not me) call this a biscuit. I call it a cookie.

                        You're right about the cookie v. biscuit deal. I was talking about standard biscuits, but we DO have dog biscuits. They are a traditionally hard item that is called a biscuit. Some companies call some hard, generally somewhat flavorless items biscuits. I generally don't like those and don't think about them.

                        And you have things like oreos that have a special kind of hardness. With a little pressure, they crumble.

                        Steve
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              • Profile picture of the author rondo
                Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                Not sure whether I really believe that site or not ...

                I mean, ok, I've heard of "peanut butter and jelly" (who hasn't?). But "biscuits and gravy"?! This isn't seriously a "thing", is it? (And why aren't they called "cookies" instead of "biscuits", anyway??).

                .
                American biscuits are similar to scones.
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                • Profile picture of the author seasoned
                  Originally Posted by rondo View Post

                  American biscuits are similar to scones.
                  Not to any scone I remember seeing!

                  Steve
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                  • Profile picture of the author rondo
                    Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

                    Not to any scone I remember seeing!

                    Steve
                    I meant British (and Australian) scones Steve.

                    "an authentic English or Scottish scone—pronounced as though there were no e at the end—is much like an American baking-powder biscuit." Slate

                    Andrew
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                    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
                      Originally Posted by rondo View Post

                      I meant British (and Australian) scones Steve.

                      "an authentic English or Scottish scone--pronounced as though there were no e at the end--is much like an American baking-powder biscuit." Slate

                      Andrew
                      I, as I think MOST Americans do, pronounce scone as "SKOHN"(OH like in "Oh my god"). Kind of like stone, with a K sound where the T sound would be. Is that wrong?

                      That article is HARD to follow!

                      But no one bothered to challenge the original poster's description of American scones as "dry bland ass triangles of nothing."
                      TRUE! Pretty good description in MY book!

                      American scones are different, and that difference can be a beautiful thing. An American scone does not need jam or clotted cream--or any filling, really: It's a self-contained snack (though an extra smear of butter never killed anyone ... at least not right away). It's pleasantly sweet, and it has wiggle room for all sorts of additions: spices, fruits, nuts, even chocolate. A wise baker will not overload an American scone with extra goodies, nor will she shy away from them. Freed of cultural baggage and expectations of authenticity, the American scone is flexible in shape and content.
                      HUH? FIRST it all but states they are dry and tasteless. THEN, it says they are feathery and tasty!

                      Still, I have seen some pastry similar to biscuits, but otherwise haven't. Biscuits are even used for some pastries, etc...

                      But, whatever. I haven't ACTUALLY been in Australia or Great Britain. I CAN tell you that americans, and those abroad misunderstand even their shared language. I saw a video once, for example, that is like MANY others I have seen from various countries, where the Australians said THEY considered thongs to be a type of sandal and Americans didn't. That isn't true. Their understanding, of American, is likely a newer use of the term. When I was a kid, the use of the term for sandals was COMMON. And I have seen Americans say the same sorts of things, etc.... English is a huge language. I believe most agree that it is the largest, with nearly a million words. And most words have a LOT of meanings.

                      Anyway, the internet is GREAT for conveying words. It can't really convey feelings, nuance, tastes, smells, texture, etc...

                      Steve
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                      • Profile picture of the author rondo
                        Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

                        I, as I think MOST Americans do, pronounce scone as "SKOHN"(OH like in "Oh my god"). Kind of like stone, with a K sound where the T sound would be. Is that wrong?
                        We pronounce it 'sconn', but as they aren't really the same thing I wouldn't say either is wrong at all.
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                      • Profile picture of the author rondo
                        Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

                        When I was a kid, the use of the term for sandals was COMMON.
                        Really? That's weird.
                        But what's even more weird is that New Zealander's call them Jandals.
                        http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=jandal
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        • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Yesterday, I was at my Auto-Erotic Asphyxiation Addiction Support Group meeting.

          We had a speaker that said that in a few countries, what we did...several times a day...was considered strange. Man, we just couldn't believe that some people were so closed minded.
          Huh. That'll be those repressed Frenchies, I'll bet.


          ..
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          • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
            Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

            Huh. That'll be those repressed Frenchies, I'll bet.


            ..
            Yup, look at Suzannes no.7.

            7. Bacon and eggs - The greasy bacon with the eggs doesn't seem suitable for breakfast. In several other countries, breakfast normally consists of fresh fruit and light bread such as a croissant.
            Honestly. Anyone that doesn't go all wobbly kneed at the smell of bacon cooking is either a member of 2 specific religions, a vegetarian, a vegan or completely loopy.
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            • Profile picture of the author LynnM
              White gravy is a strange concept - over here it's brown. Anything runnyish, white and containing flour is sauce.
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              • Profile picture of the author seasoned
                Originally Posted by LynnM View Post

                White gravy is a strange concept - over here it's brown. Anything runnyish, white and containing flour is sauce.
                HERE it is generally brown ALSO! Gravy IS a kind of sauce. As I described earlier, it isn't quite a liquid like water, and isn't as thick as syrup. And I said it could contain SOME stock. If it contained a fair amount of stock, we would call it a stew.

                Steve
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        • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Yesterday, I was at my Auto-Erotic Asphyxiation Addiction Support Group meeting.

          We had a speaker that said that in a few countries, what we did...several times a day...was considered strange. Man, we just couldn't believe that some people were so closed minded.

          He had more to say, but we were choking him, so we couldn't understand it.
          I thought it was you I saw hanging around there.

          I wanted to join myself but the fees were too high, money for old rope in my opinion.
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        • Profile picture of the author David Beroff
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Yesterday, I was at my Auto-Erotic Asphyxiation Addiction Support Group meeting.
          So... is the ultimate goal of the group to engage in this more...? Or less?
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      • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
        Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

        There was an article recently (I tried to find it...no luck) that listed ten American foods the rest of the world found odd. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were on the list. Blew my mind.
        Edit: Not the actual article I read, but close:
        10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand - Nutrition.Answers.com
        I'd have to agree with most "foods" on that list, but not liking bacon and eggs is just...weird.

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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

        There was an article recently (I tried to find it...no luck) that listed ten American foods the rest of the world found odd. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were on the list. Blew my mind.


        Edit: Not the actual article I read, but close:
        10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand - Nutrition.Answers.com
        Quick, QUICK, *****QUICK*****! Peanut butter is apparently AMERICAN, and was made by a person that was in the SAME business as ANOTHER person in ANOTHER land that made ANOTHER odd type of product of a similar consistency for the SAME REASON!!!!! Here is a HINT! BOTH are known for being in SANDWICHES!!!!!! WHAT were the "inventors"? WHY DID they do it? WHAT was the other country? WHAT was the other product?










        GIVE UP YET?






        SOME MIGHT GET IT!





        DID YOU GET IT?





        1.DOCTORS!
        2. To provide inexpensive nutrition
        3. Australia
        4. VEGEMITE!

        I love this song:


        Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
        Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

        There was an article recently (I tried to find it...no luck) that listed ten American foods the rest of the world found odd. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were on the list. Blew my mind.


        Edit: Not the actual article I read, but close:
        10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand - Nutrition.Answers.com
        Crunchy peanut butter to a...

        European like myself is a savory spread to be put on bread or toast only. In fact I add lots of black pepper to mine and sometimes double up with Marmite, a savory yeast extract spread. To put it with chocolate is abhorrent and adding jelly to it is yuk.

        Hershey bars is awful sickly sweet, fake chocolate, in fact candies I have tasted here are far to sweet compared with what I was used to. They also taste synthetic in many cases

        Biscuits with white gravy is an abomination.

        Having sweet pancakes WITH a savory breakfast is unreal to us Euro's.

        American bacon is the fatty rind we cut off our rashers of bacon.

        Potato chips are called crisps in the UK and we have so many different flavors I have lost count. Corn chips are reserved for Mexican Restaurants.

        I could go on but their is a lot of stuff I do like in the US or have come to like.
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        • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
          Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

          Crunchy peanut butter to a...

          European like myself is a savory spread to be put on bread or toast only. In fact I add lots of black pepper to mine and sometimes double up with Marmite, a savory yeast extract spread. To put it with chocolate is abhorrent and adding jelly to it is yuk.
          That is sacrilegious!!

          My favorite treat...




          Yum, Yum!


          Terra
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          • Profile picture of the author lanfear63
            Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

            That is sacrilegious!!

            My favorite treat...




            Yum, Yum!


            Terra
            Your so evil! How could you post such an abomonation
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            • Profile picture of the author ThomM
              Hershey bars is awful sickly sweet, fake chocolate, in fact candies I have tasted here are far to sweet compared with what I was used to. They also taste synthetic in many cases
              About the only (US) candy I like is the peanut butter cups Terra posted. I will admit I prefer making them myself with real chocolate and real peanut butter.
              I think my absolute favorite candy would would be chocolate covered cherries from Germany with the cherries soaked in Kirschwasser.

              Another candy(?) that I make and enjoy is two slices of banana with peanut butter in the middle coated with melted chocolate. This is the peanut butter I use.
              http://ilovepeanutbutter.com/index.p...beesknees.html
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              • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
                Banned
                Originally Posted by ThomM View Post

                About the only (US) candy I like is the peanut butter cups Terra posted. I will admit I prefer making them myself with real chocolate and real peanut butter.
                I think my absolute favorite candy would would be chocolate covered cherries from Germany with the cherries soaked in Kirschwasser.

                Another candy(?) that I make and enjoy is two slices of banana with peanut butter in the middle coated with melted chocolate. This is the peanut butter I use.
                The Bee's Knees - Peanut Butter Jars
                I'd forgotten that I used to eat banana and peanut butter sandwiches and loved them. As for American chocolate, that's not real chocolate. Tastes awful. I love a good dark chocolate, with Godiva Truffles or most Godiva chocolate being a favorite.
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                • Profile picture of the author seasoned
                  Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                  I'd forgotten that I used to eat banana and peanut butter sandwiches and loved them. As for American chocolate, that's not real chocolate. Tastes awful. I love a good dark chocolate, with Godiva Truffles or most Godiva chocolate being a favorite.
                  Quick, QUICK, *****QUICK*****! WHAT country hosts the parent of Godiva chocolates, in 1962 to 2007? What country hosts the CURRENT parent?








                  HAVE YOU FIGURED IT OUT YET?




                  NEED A HINT?





                  PURCHASED by an ICONIC company!





                  CAMPBELLS, in the US!!!!!!!!!!

                  TURKEY!!!!!!

                  Steve
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                  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
                    Banned
                    Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

                    Quick, QUICK, *****QUICK*****! WHAT country hosts the parent of Godiva chocolates, in 1962 to 2007? What country hosts the CURRENT parent?

                    HAVE YOU FIGURED IT OUT YET?

                    NEED A HINT?

                    PURCHASED by an ICONIC company!

                    CAMPBELLS, in the US!!!!!!!!!!

                    TURKEY!!!!!!

                    Steve
                    Campbells sold it thankfully, because I wouldn't trust Campbell's to maintain the original quality of this fine chocolate, considering that their main focus is cheap and not very tasty foods, like Campbell soups.

                    On December 20, 2007, Campbell announced that it entered into an agreement to sell Godiva to Yıldız Holding based in Istanbul, Turkey, which is the owner of √úlker group and the largest consumer goods manufacturer in the Turkish food industry. The acquisition was completed on March 18, 2008, for $850 million.[10]
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                    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
                      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

                      Campbells sold it thankfully, because I wouldn't trust Campbell's to maintain the original quality of this fine chocolate, considering that their main focus is cheap and not very tasty foods, like Campbell soups.
                      I WILL admit that Campbells main product line is a type of food made to stretch, They even reduced the water to reduce bulk and shipping costs. But that doesn't mean it was bad or inferior. BESIDES, they maintained the quality for about 45+ years! It is also only 1 of about 7 company like brands that I knew of. One other was godiva. You think a TURKISH company is better? No offense to the turks, just saying....

                      Steve
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                      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
                        Banned
                        Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

                        I WILL admit that Campbells main product line is a type of food made to stretch, They even reduced the water to reduce bulk and shipping costs. But that doesn't mean it was bad or inferior. BESIDES, they maintained the quality for about 45+ years! It is also only 1 of about 7 company like brands that I knew of. One other was godiva. You think a TURKISH company is better? No offense to the turks, just saying....

                        Steve
                        I've always considered Campbell's soup to be inferior, especially if used as food. lol. I don't eat any canned soup, but the only Campbell's soup I'll use is the Cream of Mushroom or Cream of Chicken as a sauce base only.

                        Sure ... why not the Turks, if they know how to continue to make and market Godiva as a luxury, premium chocolate? Campbells is not known for either luxury or premium foods. In fact, that's why they sold it. Said it was outside of their "comfort zone."
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            • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
              Originally Posted by lanfear63 View Post

              Your so evil! How could you post such an abomonation
              It was quite simple, actually.


              Terra
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          • Profile picture of the author discrat
            Man I guess Peanut Butter is an American thing.

            One huge Spoon of Crunchy Peanut Butter and a big glass of ice cold milk is my midnight main stable for a snack
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            • Profile picture of the author Kurt
              Originally Posted by discrat View Post

              Man I guess Peanut Butter is an American thing.

              One huge Spoon of Crunchy Peanut Butter and a big glass of ice cold milk is my midnight main stable for a snack
              I eat at least 2-3 peanut butter sandwiches a week. Often, it's a PB, banana and honey sandwich with a glass of milk, which is about as nutritious ( and tastey) as you can get.
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    • Profile picture of the author ThomM
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Interesting. It makes me wonder how many other things we accept, that other people just think is weird. It can probably apply to anything.


      Thanks for posting.
      What I noticed in the video was the reasons they thought them weird.
      Twinkies "That's not cream"
      Kool-aid, "Add a cup of sugar?"
      Fruit Loops, "more sugar"
      Twizzlers, "same ingredients as fruit loops"
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by ThomM View Post

        What I noticed in the video was the reasons they thought them weird.
        Twinkies "That's not cream"
        Kool-aid, "Add a cup of sugar?"
        Fruit Loops, "more sugar"
        Twizzlers, "same ingredients as fruit loops"
        Yeah, it's amazing what fresh eyes can illuminate.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    I have no respect for the culinary tastes of anyone that doesn't like root beer floats.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alfred Shelver
    9. Snow Cones
    I think someone ate the yellow snow .,, always a bad idea If I Learned one thing from American documentary TV or as some call it Jackass NEVER EAT THE YELLOW SNOW.
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    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
      Originally Posted by Alfred Shelver View Post

      I think someone ate the yellow snow .,, always a bad idea If I Learned one thing from American documentary TV or as some call it Jackass NEVER EAT THE YELLOW SNOW.
      Snow cones are made of ARTIFICIAL snow. It is actually SHAVED ICE.

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author Alfred Shelver
        Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

        Snow cones are made of ARTIFICIAL snow. It is actually SHAVED ICE.

        Steve
        I know just being facetious, My kids love snowcones we have a Disney snow cone maker always at hand, however for us Africans who mostly have never even seen snow wouldn't be too difficult to trick em
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  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Peanutbutter actually isn't that bad. Natural can be messy though. Jelly is basically a kind of stabilized jam that is made more consistent. SANDWICHES were made by the BRITISH!!!!!!!

    Biscuits are nice, and gravy often is ALSO! A biscuit, in the AMERICAN context, is UNIQUE! It isn't a cookie, cake, roll, etc... Gravy is a slightly thickened broth, thickened to a thin syrup consistency, that MIGHT have SOME stock in it.

    NOW, as to the others?

    Twinkies "That's not cream" YEAH, she's right. They'll feed people ANYTHING!
    Kool-aid, "Add a cup of sugar?" "
    Fruit Loops, "more sugar" "
    Twizzlers, "same ingredients as fruit loops" To a degree, RIGHT, "

    As to the others?

    1. Velveeta Cheese It was made to have a consistency and stability. Bad, but well....
    2. Hershey's Chocolate HEY! What's bad?
    3. Red Vines See twizzlers!
    4. Supermarket Bread OK, consistency and stability. Bad, but well....
    5. Casseroles This is a METHOD more than a taste
    6. Root Beer Floats Based on a british drink,
    7. Twizzlers See twizzlers
    8. Pop Tarts Again, the cheap base to try to have a quick breakfast. Bad, but well....
    9. Snow Cones Actually, not that bad. YEAH, it has sugar and likely artificial flavor, but the consistency, and flavor to flavoring is great.
    10. Beef Jerky This was based on an American Indian idea! Actually, a GREAT idea! Tasty, healthy, quick, and nutritious. What's the problem?
    11. Corn Dogs Bad, but well....
    12. Biscuits and Gravy SEE ABOVE!
    13. American Bacon OK, so it has a lot of nitrites. Other than that, what's the problem?
    14. Meatloaf AGAIN, more a method than a dish.

    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author rondo
    Froot loops were big in Australia when I was a kid. I ate them all the time!

    Andrew
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