Advertising Help: Mistake 1

12 replies
Telling searchers the advantages of using the product or service when
the decision to buy has already been made to buy.

Your buyer already knows the advantages when you optimize for keywords on your website, advertise on Craigslist, advertise in the Yellow Pages, classified sections in newspapers, magazines, Yelp, Home Advisor etc.

Your buyer just needs to choose from who to buy.

Your job is to make that job easy and take them off the market.

You can do this by...

1 Alerting them to costly mistakes of getting that decision wrong

2 Common bad practices in your industry

3 Different grades available along with the levels of performance of each

4 Alerting to a new threat they aren't aware of and competitors aren't telling

5 An ingredient which only you talk about which causes superior performance without the negatives other common one's have

6 Give tips to achieve the desired end result easier, faster and with more certainty

7 List your steps taken to show the
level of certainty of desired result

8 Guarantee whatever real or perceived bad experience the buyer
has had or will have, won't happen with a clear penalty if it did.

Best,
Doctor E. Vile
#advertising #mistake
  • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
    Great advice.

    Out of curiosity Ewen it may help some of the folks on here if you have a screenshot of a sales path doing this spot on.

    When I picture this in my mind from situations I have seen it something like this.

    Person Google's "Buy product X with free delivery" of "Buy product X fastest shipping"

    People doing it wrong will run ads starting as though the consumer has not decided.
    Ads like "Compare product X to product Y" but the search terms indicate the decision is made and shipping is the issue.

    A smart sellers ad will read "Product X with free shipping to your door in 48 hours"
    The smart sellers page will only quickly summarize what they know the buyer already knows about the product. Just provide reassurance and trust in the form of a quick checklist, star rating, trust seals etc....

    At that point there should be minimal friction to purchase. They will only blow the sale if they make it hard for the visitor to perform what should be the simple task of paying for it.
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      The epitome of the exact opposite of what is being discussed here... sept it is so far in the other direction, it absolutely targets what is being discussed here.

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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Peter, possibly I'm thinking a fraction earlier in the buying cycle
        than what you mentioned.

        Say somebody has decided on a granite benchtop.

        One advertiser talks about the advantages of granite over marble.
        (wasted message)

        Another advertiser tells how to choose the right granite.

        Another advertiser takes it too far by calling out price first.

        The middle advertiser diverts the ready to buy people
        to him because the majority of ready to buy people
        in any market aren't very knowledgeable or if they are,
        can have their buying criteria re-set.

        Clearer?

        Best,
        Doctor E. Vile
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        • Profile picture of the author qu4rk
          Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

          Peter, possibly I'm thinking a fraction earlier in the buying cycle
          than what you mentioned.

          Say somebody has decided on a granite benchtop.

          One advertiser talks about the advantages of granite over marble.
          (wasted message)

          Another advertiser tells how to choose the right granite.

          Another advertiser takes it too far by calling out price first.

          The middle advertiser diverts the ready to buy people
          to him because the majority of ready to buy people
          in any market aren't very knowledgeable or if they are,
          can have their buying criteria re-set.

          Clearer?

          Best,
          Doctor E. Vile
          So, the message to these people is, "we know that you're ready to buy (implied), let us show you how make the final decision (verbalized)".

          Is that a fair summary Dr.?
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by qu4rk View Post

            So, the message to these people is, "we know that you're ready to buy (implied), let us show you how make the final decision (verbalized)".

            Is that a fair summary Dr.?
            Not sure if you have nailed it.

            Can you expand on it?

            Best,
            Doctor E. Vile
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            • Profile picture of the author savidge4
              As much as I agree with much that is being said here, there are points that I will have to disagree with. As I see it there are basically 3 steps or categories of site visitors. there is the educational group, there is the comparison group, and then there is the buying group.

              The educational group, the ones that think "Hey I want a marble bench top" and they go searching. They are quick to learn that there are different patterns and different thickness' and different bull nose patterns etc. I honestly don't think you can retain these people and move them into buyers. As much as we can educate these people to WHY our product is superior, we are without question creating more questions than answers. Almost by default, we are creating the need for further search inquires.

              This for me is where a piece such as Mr. Lessard mentions becomes key. That little piece of "Viral" material that becomes an offline point of reference. Something to show the husband or wife, something to fall back on, well maybe there is in answer to this or that question there.

              Then the point comes that the end user understands what it is they want. Midnight black Italian marble with a rounded bullnose that is 2" ( 5.08cm ) thick, the next phase of comparison kicks in. People such as Mr. Lessard and myself are counting on the stickiness of the above mentioned piece and we are at that pointing hoping for that returned visit. IF NOT... as you may notice I have underlined a couple things above. These would be keyword points of entry. The first is less defined, and the second is VERY targeted.

              THIS is the point that a very strong USP falls into play. The fact that you have free delivery, and free in home measurements yada yada.. couple that with possible brand recognition ( they have been to your site before, and found it informative ) and you have more than a fighting chance to close the deal.

              The above process as I see it, is how a "Product" purchase is made. What I find to be interesting in the above process is many times as site owners, we tend to look at "Unique" visitors as a gauge to the success of our sites. But looking at the above suggested model, uniques are obviously required to sustain a business, but it is the "Repeat" visitors that will ultimately pay the bills.

              If you have a site that is not selling much look at the site data and see the unique/repeat ratio. I have found that having something in the 2:1 ( 2 uniques to 1 return ) or greater, ( 5:3 being an example ) is a good indicator, that you are catching traffic at both ends of the buying spectrum, and there should be an amount of success. IF you have a great amount of return visitors, and your conversions are low, this is a key indicator that your USP is poor or non effective - or that there is a price issue.

              Service based selling is a bit different. If you need a plumber... well you need a plumber. There is no education needed... a Solid USP and a solid call to action backed by an instant contact method is golden.

              There are kinks in all of this. Oziboomer's example would be one of those. Picture framing as an example could be a product, but can also be a service. I can go to the store and buy a frame, or I can have it done. those looking to get it done fall into the service category, and the "The Endurart Process" is obviously a GREAT USP.

              I personally am very familiar with using "Archival Quality" as a USP because of my large format printing arm of my business. The right combination of printer, ink and paper ( HP ) can produce prints that are tested and guaranteed for 100+ yrs. A better than great selling point.
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              • Profile picture of the author DABK
                I'm going to agree with you while disagreeing with you.

                All 3 groups, you're right about them, but you can get the educational group to return, buy from you.

                Because the educational group is made of 2 sub-groups:

                people who're searching for marble because they're writing a paper on it, they're out of info for their blog posts and are looking for posts/articles to pilfer, etc.

                people who are planning to use the product if something changes in their life or at some point x weeks/months/days into the future.

                What needs to change is something like getting a raise, paying off some loan, etc.

                Those people you can get back, assuming you have the right 'bait.'

                The trick is to have something on your site that works for all 3 groups.

                Dan Kennedy's site does this right.

                You could download a free gift worth some 600 bucks that you were told contains a lot of info, much of it actionable, and get 2 months of free membership, etc.

                At the same time, he had other things going on the home page (video, what we do, how we do, some events, testimonials).

                Yes, he's selling services too, not just products. But I think his homepage appeals to all 3 groups (though not in equal parts).

                Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

                As much as I agree with much that is being said here, there are points that I will have to disagree with. As I see it there are basically 3 steps or categories of site visitors. there is the educational group, there is the comparison group, and then there is the buying group.

                The educational group, the ones that think "Hey I want a marble bench top" and they go searching. They are quick to learn that there are different patterns and different thickness' and different bull nose patterns etc. I honestly don't think you can retain these people and move them into buyers. As much as we can educate these people to WHY our product is superior, we are without question creating more questions than answers. Almost by default, we are creating the need for further search inquires.

                This for me is where a piece such as Mr. Lessard mentions becomes key. That little piece of "Viral" material that becomes an offline point of reference. Something to show the husband or wife, something to fall back on, well maybe there is in answer to this or that question there.

                Then the point comes that the end user understands what it is they want. Midnight black Italian marble with a rounded bullnose that is 2" ( 5.08cm ) thick, the next phase of comparison kicks in. People such as Mr. Lessard and myself are counting on the stickiness of the above mentioned piece and we are at that pointing hoping for that returned visit. IF NOT... as you may notice I have underlined a couple things above. These would be keyword points of entry. The first is less defined, and the second is VERY targeted.

                THIS is the point that a very strong USP falls into play. The fact that you have free delivery, and free in home measurements yada yada.. couple that with possible brand recognition ( they have been to your site before, and found it informative ) and you have more than a fighting chance to close the deal.

                The above process as I see it, is how a "Product" purchase is made. What I find to be interesting in the above process is many times as site owners, we tend to look at "Unique" visitors as a gauge to the success of our sites. But looking at the above suggested model, uniques are obviously required to sustain a business, but it is the "Repeat" visitors that will ultimately pay the bills.

                If you have a site that is not selling much look at the site data and see the unique/repeat ratio. I have found that having something in the 2:1 ( 2 uniques to 1 return ) or greater, ( 5:3 being an example ) is a good indicator, that you are catching traffic at both ends of the buying spectrum, and there should be an amount of success. IF you have a great amount of return visitors, and your conversions are low, this is a key indicator that your USP is poor or non effective - or that there is a price issue.

                Service based selling is a bit different. If you need a plumber... well you need a plumber. There is no education needed... a Solid USP and a solid call to action backed by an instant contact method is golden.

                There are kinks in all of this. Oziboomer's example would be one of those. Picture framing as an example could be a product, but can also be a service. I can go to the store and buy a frame, or I can have it done. those looking to get it done fall into the service category, and the "The Endurart Process" is obviously a GREAT USP.

                I personally am very familiar with using "Archival Quality" as a USP because of my large format printing arm of my business. The right combination of printer, ink and paper ( HP ) can produce prints that are tested and guaranteed for 100+ yrs. A better than great selling point.
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                • Profile picture of the author savidge4
                  I agree with what is being said, BUT I believe there may have been some points that may have been poorly articulated on my part.

                  First off Dan Kennedy... he would be what I would consider to be a "Kink" People may be looking in a broad sense and come to his site. BUT the traffic regardless of how they get there to some point falls into that Very Targeted category. They aren't falling under educational, and it would be hard to say that they fall under comparison. That traffic as you stated with the right USP and product is extremely closable.

                  In comparison we look at Marble Countertops / Bench tops and you will find that more defined segmentation of visitor ( Educational - Comparison - Buyer ) You mention that some maybe looking to write a paper or get blog ideas etc. this is where the value of the Analytic side of the Unique vs repeat visitor comes into play. I find that with a purely product based site 80% of my BUYING traffic is a repeat visitor. That means that only 20% have never been to my site, and are finding me in their "buying" stage.

                  So let me lay out some basic site development principles I use to achieve this. I start a e-commerce site out with the obvious basic stuff needed, this includes product specific pages - the selling page. I develop a site to this level and get it listed in assorted search engines and develop some traction / traffic. These pages are specifically "Comparison" stage and "Buyer" stage pages. ( strong USP and intended to make the conversion )

                  As the site develops traffic, there are going to be products that obviously list better than others. I obviously work on increasing the traffic to the lessor hit products / keywords. The other aspect I start working on is the Educational aspect of products that have traction. This added step as I see it is an integral part in developing that Brand recognition that I mentioned earlier. So I start developing viral content ( "Find out the 10 questions to ask all framers" )

                  *** a quick side note to Oziboomer. When I was typing your CTA above I found myself instinctively typing "Find out the 10 questions you need to ask all framers" Something you may want to test ***

                  I start developing content that will educate on that specific product. As the example already given; marble, and all of its variations in color and pattern and thickness etc. I basically allow my sites reach and the data collected as such, to dictate the addition of educational content. What this does is pulls me out of the Buyers phase and expands my traffic base into the educational phase.

                  Again from my own personal experience it is repeat visitors that I am striving for, and this is the best smarter not harder system I have developed in getting those results. Allowing the actual site data to guide you in the addition of content as a reflection of interest in the actual product you have.

                  This starts playing on the fundamental idea that I have with websites and its pages specifically. Each page has a function. A sales page does just that sell. A squeeze page does just that, squeezes. A informational page gives just that information. I think trying to draw multiple function out of any single pages detracts from the intent, and will dilute the overall effectiveness.

                  Originally Posted by DABK View Post

                  I'm going to agree with you while disagreeing with you.

                  All 3 groups, you're right about them, but you can get the educational group to return, buy from you.

                  Because the educational group is made of 2 sub-groups:

                  people who're searching for marble because they're writing a paper on it, they're out of info for their blog posts and are looking for posts/articles to pilfer, etc.

                  people who are planning to use the product if something changes in their life or at some point x weeks/months/days into the future.

                  What needs to change is something like getting a raise, paying off some loan, etc.

                  Those people you can get back, assuming you have the right 'bait.'

                  The trick is to have something on your site that works for all 3 groups.

                  Dan Kennedy's site does this right.

                  You could download a free gift worth some 600 bucks that you were told contains a lot of info, much of it actionable, and get 2 months of free membership, etc.

                  At the same time, he had other things going on the home page (video, what we do, how we do, some events, testimonials).

                  Yes, he's selling services too, not just products. But I think his homepage appeals to all 3 groups (though not in equal parts).
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            • Profile picture of the author qu4rk
              Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

              Not sure if you have nailed it.

              Can you expand on it?

              Best,
              Doctor E. Vile
              Dr. Vile, I see that you've posted mistake #2, but I still don't have a solid understanding of mistake #1. I posted this:

              So, the message to these people is, "we know that you're ready to buy (implied), let us show you how make the final decision (verbalized)".
              What I mean is that:

              1) You know they are ready to buy due to where the ad is placed.
              2) You're moving away from benefits of using the product/service ... not really mentioning them.
              3) You're showing them the best way of how to make the final purchasing decision.
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              • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                1) You know they are ready to buy due to where the ad is placed.
                (Are you referring to the buyer is placing an ad?)

                2) You're moving away from benefits of using the product/service ... not really mentioning them.
                (No. It's the sequence where you show you understand
                what the buyer is going through first)

                3) You're showing them the best way of how to make the final purchasing decision.
                (Correct)
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        • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
          Much and falls in line with the processes I use.

          All of my client sites on any page always have a lead magnet available for download that will address the questions that the client through their years of experience have noted where a concern to their prospects and needed to be dealt with to either close off the sale or re-set their buying criteria.

          The lead magnet also helps to set my clients up as experts in their field as they are now educators first, sellers second.

          Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

          Peter, possibly I'm thinking a fraction earlier in the buying cycle
          than what you mentioned.

          Say somebody has decided on a granite benchtop.

          One advertiser talks about the advantages of granite over marble.
          (wasted message)

          Another advertiser tells how to choose the right granite.

          Another advertiser takes it too far by calling out price first.

          The middle advertiser diverts the ready to buy people
          to him because the majority of ready to buy people
          in any market aren't very knowledgeable or if they are,
          can have their buying criteria re-set.

          Clearer?

          Best,
          Doctor E. Vile
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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

    5 An ingredient which only you talk about which causes superior performance without the negatives other common one's have
    In my offline business there have been surveys done in the US regarding primary reasons people sought out a Custom picture framer and one of the prominent reasons given was to conserve or protect their photographs, artworks etc for future generations to enjoy.

    We created a brand that encompassed the methods used to protect people's pictures and was fortunate enough to get an article published on the process in the leading industry publication, Picture Frame Magazine.

    "The Endurart Process"

    Endurart - Your Best Choice Today to Enjoy Your Pictures Tomorrow

    We use this to great effect and frequently talk and refer to the process when quoting or prospecting for leads.

    Ideally we'd like to license the use of the brand and offer some training and insurance program for others in the industry who would use the process.

    If someone walks away from a consultation with us and then seeks pricing from competitors using the same process the competitors have a hard time discrediting our methods or they scramble to say

    "We can do something similar"

    ... but they can't use the brand and we often end up being selected to do the job.
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