Impact your business by understanding trust.

15 replies
There was an interesting thread here that asked
"are you relying on personality over process."

My answer is that I rely on REAL trust over both personality and process.

Most of us here want to either sell something or help others sell something.
Most of us are trying to sell it via the internet using calls, emails and automation.
We could all seriously impact our businesses if we truly understood trust
and how most of the popular methods are at complete odds with real trust thus
dramatically hurting our results.

Most of us try to sell by using examples of our work, testimonials and the like.
We develop scripts and processes.
The consumer recognizes from a mile away how impersonal these are
and worse nothing about doing it this way builds real trust.

What is real trust or what you could call emotional trust versus logical trust.
Real trust has nothing to do with your track record.
It has nothing to do with testimonials.
Has nothing to do with getting the script just right.
Real trust is an emotion that either gets triggered or not
and you can trigger it by doing things differently.


Before I continue, lets examine REAL trust.

What do most consider their most valuable possession?
For those that have them, it's their kids.
Imagine you and the wife want to go out on Friday.
You have a choice.
Hire Jane, a 16 year old with almost no babysitting experience.
Just a kid but you know Jane, you know her family, you know her story.
You can pretty much imagine Jane running into a burning building
to save your kids can't you?

Now imagine a 35 year old professional that just moved to town.
You don't really know anything about her except you have heard
that she has 10 years experience in child care.
She knows nothing about your story and you know nothing of hers.

Who will you choose?
You can bet it will be Jane.

Now think of that one guy you would trust with your life.
The guy you would call to hide you if someone was trying to kill you.
The one that would show up with a shovel at 4am in the desert to
help you hide the body.

99% of the time that ONE friend is often to others the biggest screw up you know.
That one friend is generally the one that your spouse hates you hanging out with.
How come you would not call your accountant?
It's because you know that friends story and he yours. Even though he is a screw up there is a real trust connection that defies logic.
See how track records, qualifications and all the logical stuff has NOTHING
to do with real trust?


REAL trust is an emotion that gets triggered by knowing story and being known.
Its triggered by knowing what someone or something is about.
Understanding this could change any type of business in short order.

Online and automation are great for going fast and scaling.
They are TERRIBLE for triggering the emotions that build trust.
Yet in the face of this reality most businesses are actually making it
worse rather than better.

They build processes that remove the human connection.
When was the last time that you felt you communicated with someone that cared
instead of feeling that you merely entered the pipeline to a process.

You already instinctively know this.
When getting action is crucial to you what do you do?
You get personal and pray you can break through the process
and hit the persons emotional triggers.
Imagine they turn off your heat and you have young kids.
Now your on the phone with "operator 27".
Would you start quoting your track record on paying bills?
or instead while he is reading you his script would you get real, build story and say
"do you have kids? mine are cold, one has the flu and a temperature
is there any way you can help me?"
You would then hope for a pause and a human reaction.
You hope he stops calling you Mr. X and says
"Steve I am not supposed to do this but I am going to try to help you".

Recognizing what real trust is, it now becomes much easier to build
and at minimum you can stop investing in purposely building systems
that completely kill it.
Simple changes could be applied to any type of company.

CELL PHONE COMPANY:

Imagine a cell phone service provider.
They are a dime a dozen, so impersonal.
Imagine if you got a call today..

"Hi Steve, my name is Mark I work for abc mobile.
I wanted to introduce myself. I'm just a young guy here starting at ABC.
Married and just had our first son Tyson. Reason I am telling you this is because
I just got put in charge of your account and I think there's away I can
do something really cool for you plus bring home some extra money for my family
and don't worry the money won't be coming out of your pocket.
I see on your account you have 3 kids that have mobiles. I guess that's something I have to look forward to providing for my boy though I can't imagine what cell phones will look like when he hits 16.
Anyway, I don't know why nobody called you but because you have been with ABC
for 2 years and never got an upgrade on your phones I can send one out today at no upfront cost and you can even surprise your kids with an upgrade if you want.... Cool thing is I get a bonus for just being helpful so we both win."

Hybrids of sharing story and breaking out of scripts or at least personalizing them to the extent they are not blatant scripts are not difficult to build if you use your imagination. You can also shift training in organizations from scripts to trust building.

When was the last time you got an email or touch from ANY service provider that made you trust them more? Can you see some small shifts you can make to get closer to real trust?
#business #imagine #impact #trust #understood
  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Then you're not answering.

    You can have trust (trust is real or it's not trust, so real trust is opposed to?) and rely on personality over process.

    You can have trust and rely on process over personality.

    If you have trust and rely more on personality than on process (or you have no process), you're having and will have a hard time producing consistently and/or growing.

    Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

    There was an interesting thread here that asked
    "are you relying on personality over process."

    My answer is that I rely on REAL trust over both personality and process.
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
      Process can have personality.
      Example Virgin Mobile. Look at their marketing.
      They still have process.

      In regards to trust there are levels of trust, it's not black and white.
      Trust that is on an emotional level always trumps logical trust.
      Logically I trust my bank will be open tomorrow.
      Emotionally I trust my best friend would take a bullet for me.
      The trust I have in my bank, the economy and most service providers does not run very deep.
      When people make big buying decisions they go off of emotional trust.

      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      Then you're not answering.

      You can have trust (trust is real or it's not trust, so real trust is opposed to?) and rely on personality over process.

      You can have trust and rely on process over personality.

      If you have trust and rely more on personality than on process (or you have no process), you're having and will have a hard time producing consistently and/or growing.
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      • Profile picture of the author DABK
        Agreed. But you're still not answering the question asked, the one you positioned your post as an answer to.

        Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

        Process can have personality.
        Example Virgin Mobile. Look at their marketing.
        They still have process.

        In regards to trust there are levels of trust, it's not black and white.
        Trust that is on an emotional level always trumps logical trust.
        Logically I trust my bank will be open tomorrow.
        Emotionally I trust my best friend would take a bullet for me.
        The trust I have in my bank, the economy and most service providers does not run very deep.
        When people make big buying decisions they go off of emotional trust.
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        • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
          What question? My post is "Impact your business by understanding trust".

          The purpose of my post is to point out the disconnect between the types of trust we attempt to build ( generally logical) and how logical trust fails miserably when compared to building emotional (real) trust. I use this information to close more sales and have used it very succesfully to dramatically boost sales for clients.

          If my message is unclear and does not deliver I welcome you to add your input for the benefit of others viewing this post. This is after all a discussion and not some promise of delivering all the answers on a silver platter.



          Originally Posted by DABK View Post

          Then you're not answering.

          You can have trust (trust is real or it's not trust, so real trust is opposed to?) and rely on personality over process.

          You can have trust and rely on process over personality.

          If you have trust and rely more on personality than on process (or you have no process), you're having and will have a hard time producing consistently and/or growing.
          Originally Posted by DABK View Post

          Agreed. But you're still not answering the question asked, the one you positioned your post as an answer to.
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          Ready to generate the next million in sales? The Next Million Agency
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

            What question? My post is "Impact your business by understanding trust".
            Peter;

            Why are you refusing to answer the question, "Impact your business by understanding trust".?


            By the way, extremely valuable post.
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            "Those who know that they are profound strive for clarity. Those who would like to seem profound to the crowd strive for obscurity" Friedrich Nietzsche
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            • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
              It's Ewen's fault Claude.
              He told me to leave em guessing ;-)

              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              Peter;

              Why are you refusing to answer the question, "Impact your business by understanding trust".?


              By the way, extremely valuable post.
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              Ready to generate the next million in sales? The Next Million Agency
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              • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

                It's Ewen's fault Claude.
                He told me to leave em guessing ;-)
                That's your fault Peter in trusting a fake doctor!

                Best,
                Doctor E. Vile

                P.S. Watch out for a post coming up how leaving them guessing
                made a sales trainer $200,000. Prior to leave 'em guessing
                he couldn't get 7 prospects to give him the time of day.
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          • Profile picture of the author DABK
            In your original post you stated the following:

            "There was an interesting thread here that asked
            "are you relying on personality over process."

            My answer is that I rely on REAL trust over both personality and process."

            Hence my responses.

            And my question: How do you get to trust if you're not careful enough with language?


            Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

            There was an interesting thread here that asked
            "are you relying on personality over process."

            My answer is that I rely on REAL trust over both personality and process.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9878748].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
              You would do us all a great service if you could create a new thread around the subject, expanding on your insights.

              Originally Posted by DABK View Post

              And my question: How do you get to trust if you're not careful enough with language?
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              Ready to generate the next million in sales? The Next Million Agency
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              • Profile picture of the author savidge4
                Trust... an interesting topic to say the least. My personal communication style with clients is very much based around my concepts of trust, or should I say beliefs in trust. I believe there are 2 levels of trust. there is Trust ( capital T ) and there is trust. On a certain level there is Trust for all things. Then there is a learned level of trust.

                As a new born Trust is at its peak. Social and environmental surroundings and change introduces trust. The level of these two types of trust are obviously different for each and every one of us. Depending on how you were raised and a myrid of many other factors.

                I was raised with an old Sicilian phrase "Screw me once shame on you. Screw me twice shame on me." I was taught to Trust until proven other wise. Times have changed and as much as I try to instill these same concepts / principles to my 6 yr old son, I am left with the times we live in to also introduce "Do not speak to strangers". It honestly pains me to do that, but I have to.

                By virtue of society I am decreasing my sons level of Trust and increasing, his level of trust.

                I would say that trust is a generational issue, or should I say identifier. Younger generations Trust far less than the older generations. You have to earn Trust with the younger generations. And the minimum of trust is only given to a young persons inner circle. In contrast to the older demographic where deals are struck with a hand shake, and by their word. In todays world... You will believe it, when you see it.

                There has simply been to much wrong in this world. Trust has been broken.

                As a providers of services, I believe that I am not selling what I do, as much as I am developing a level of trust within my prospective clients to believe in what I am saying I will do, and breaking that barrier to them trusting I will do what I say I will.

                As much as many here read books associated with sales, my reading tends to be more into philosophical / scientific stuff. An American philosopher Daniel Dennett has an interesting theory of "Mental Content" within this he develops the concepts of "Intentional Stance". Ill save you from looking it up ( Intentional stance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )

                It is actually your fairly basic 3 principle concept that dictates the ideals of trust as being a behavior. A behavior that we look at in a predictive manor. Do they follow through.. they are trustworthy. Do they not follow through, no they are not trustworthy. It obviously gets deeper than that, but that is jest of it.

                So looking at that we see that Trust becomes a behavioral trait in the eyes of others. As Mr. Lessard has shared, its the little things that develop trust. Very much like the principle in sales to develop a series of yes' to culminate in the objective Yes and closing the deal. The same applies in developing a series of trust ( small t ) to getting to that greater more important Trust ( Capital T )
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                • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                  Trust had been broken in the Auckland lawnmowing world of consumers.

                  The contractors were oblivious to it.

                  The majority of phone calls I got was because
                  yet another contractor let them down.

                  Yet the ads still said the same promises
                  that had been broken.

                  I was the only one who addressed the broken
                  trust head on.

                  I named the 3 things commonly caused frustration,
                  said it will never happen, and my penalty payable
                  to the customer is $1,000.

                  If you asked a random group or individual
                  who has used a plumber, electrician, builder
                  what were their biggest annoyance with them,
                  you'll get 3 themes.

                  Those themes are again about breaking trust.

                  Rare to find anyone tackling it head on to the degree
                  of creating a penalty for breaking that bond of trust.

                  People are ignorant of trust being broken by others,
                  the degree in which it has and why it should be tackled
                  head on with your marketing.

                  Best,
                  Doctor E. Vile
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  • Profile picture of the author JayBay
    A google adwords employee called me up to see how I was doing. Not with adwords but in general. We chatted about his time in a band before working for google, the awful weather were he is, and his brother needing a job. Now he trusts me more than ever!
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    What can I do to be more helpful to you?

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  • Profile picture of the author asamanthinketh
    Dope, dope post. Triple thumbs up - and I only got two, but for trust I'll figure a way to grow a third right? Haha. Nice piece.
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    I know it's a matter of semantics but I find logic. vs. emotional "trust" in sales to be somewhat of a false duality. One kind of goes hand in hand with the other.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

    My answer is that I rely on REAL trust over both personality and process.

    What is real trust or what you could call emotional trust versus logical trust.
    Real trust has nothing to do with your track record.
    It has nothing to do with testimonials.
    Has nothing to do with getting the script just right.
    Real trust is an emotion that either gets triggered or not
    and you can trigger it by doing things differently.
    I think trust is something built over time much like your reputation.

    Sometimes "TRUST" is instant in that you know the person you are taking to will deliver on what they promise.... but usually it requires some proof or some re-assurance to push people into trusting businesses or individuals.

    Just today I was discussing with a staff member who had read about a well known business family who had yet again "STRAYED" into untrustworthy waters.

    We were discussing the "Rise and Fall of Millionaire Craig Gore"

    He obviously had the trust of many individuals.

    I Quote the Courier Mail a local news paper where I am...


    CRAIG Gore once revelled in the conspicuous consumption of private jets, fast cars and luxury boats.

    So it's indicative of how far the failed Gold Coast executive has fallen these days that he relies entirely on his 30-year-old Swedish girlfriend to pay the rent for their Ephraim Island home.He even owes her $11,000.

    Another $800,000 is owed to his ex-wife, who is still entitled to nearly $52,000 a year in child support payments.

    Gore has only $100 cash, a negative bank balance of $2.1 million, no superannuation and just a few toys left over from his glory days on the BRW Rich List before the global financial crisis hit.

    He's got a Renoir bust acquired for £30,000 and now valued at between $20,000 and $100,000.

    There are three watches, including a Cartier sports model, worth about $7200.

    Then there are three automobiles: a 1969 Cadillac de Ville, a Ford V8 Supercar and a 1997 "championship" car which are collectively valued at between $35,000 and $60,000.

    That's about all that remains for the 43-year-old entrepreneur, who once described himself as "one of Australia's most dynamic, successful and motivated young businessmen".

    Worth more than $200 million at his peak, he served as chairman of the Atkinson Gore Group and sat astride 102 companies focused mainly on finance and property development.

    The sad details of his decline are included in a report to creditors prepared by Max Prentice of BPS Recovery in Sydney.

    Prentice now serves as controlling trustee for Gore, who this month entered what is believed to be Australia's biggest Part X personal insolvency agreement with 92 creditors. They are owed a staggering $495 million mainly stemming from his personal debt guarantees.

    Among those owed the most are Trilogy Funds Management ($193.8 million), Mayfair Ltd ($138 million), GE Commercial Corporation ($31.1 million), 21st Century Racing Holdings ($20 million) and American Express ($17 million).

    An overwhelming majority of creditors voted for the deal, which will see them claw back just $3.3 million over three years and 30 per cent of any profits Gore funnels into a trust.

    That works out to less than 1¢ in the dollar--a meagre 0.66 cent return.

    The decision follows the bankrupting of Gore's long-time business partner, Sydney accountant John Atkinson, over an $86,697 debt in May.

    Prentice recommended the Part X option because bankrupting Gore again would have returned even less - and probably nothing.

    Gore was previously bankrupt between 1992 and 1999, with creditors owed $300,000 eventually getting back only 11¢ in the dollar.

    The usual three-year term of bankruptcy was extended because Gore's then-trustee determined he engaged in misleading and deceptive conduct and also continued to manage a corporation.

    Gore's fall-and-rise-and-fall saga now easily eclipses the track record of his late father, who developed Sanctuary Cove on the Gold Coast before dying in exile in 1992 with debts of more than $40 million.

    It brings to a close a long and drawn-out decline since the first cracks in Gore's empire became apparent in February last year when receivers and managers were appointed to three entities in the Atkinson Gore Group over a $145 million loan default.

    The Prentice report reveals Gore first had problems paying debts in 2008 and may have been insolvent well before he first sought Part X relief in September this year.

    "I believe the debtor became insolvent on or about May 2009," Prentice wrote.

    "At this time, the debtor became liable under personal guarantees he gave for debts of associated entities and other debts for which he had no prospect of being able to repay."

    Prentice also flagged the possibility Gore's debts could blow out further because 23 of his companies had collapsed.

    "Due to the debtor's involvement in the management of several companies which are in external administration it is possible that the companies or liquidators of the companies will have claims against the debtor which would increase the value of the total debtors unsecured debts," the report says.

    Gore is now banned from managing a corporation or serving as a company director for three years.

    But his future prospects appear to have been helped by UK-based billionaire Lord Michael Ashcroft and American investor Kevin Kalkhoven, who jointly acquired some of the still viable assets in the Atkinson Gore Group.

    Ashcroft's aforementioned Mayfair Group was one of Gore's biggest debtors and voted for the Part X. Together with Kalkhoven, he controls the firm International Marina Development and Management (IMDM), which has struck a deal to pay Gore $2 million a year in consulting fees.

    All of the money will be channelled through a newly registered entity which has as its director Graeme Stonehouse, a long-time Gore business associate.

    He is among Gore's 92 creditors and owed $2 million.

    Gore also expects to receive another $500,000 over the next 12 months from a trust, which was created in 2006 and has since then distributed $2.75 million.

    Shane Stone, a former chief minister of the Northern Territory and ex-federal president of the Liberal Party, is a director of IMDM. He also remains a director of another Gore-linked entity, Aussie Vineyards, which lists Gore's girlfriend, Marina Oesterberg, as one of the "key executives".

    The company's website still praises Gore for his "outstanding management record".

    Elsewhere, Gore's Part X status will effectively neutralise current court bids to have him bankrupted, most recently by Bendigo and Adelaide Bank.

    But he still remains enmeshed in a thicket of other legal actions, eight as plaintiff and 19 as defendant, according to Prentice.

    Gore, who reportedly shed tears on the day creditors approved the Part X, declined to comment.

    Will he rebound a third time? Only time will tell. But Gore has demonstrated his ability to recover in the past.

    After all, this is a man who slept in his car and sold cans of soft drink on the beach at one point during his 1990s bankruptcy before reaching the dizzying heights from which he has now fallen.
    It always seems that trust is something that powerful or wealthy or influential people can wield and generate at will but the less fortunate individuals who may actually be more trustworthy suffer because they don't have the assertive attitude and authority that some apparently "UNTRUSTWORTHY" people have.
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