How hard is it to become a software reseller

13 replies
I sell hardware and software for a living and I'm particularly good at selling software (not boasting but I just am ) especially in the cybersecurity market.

My question is how hard is to become a software reseller. I hope to start my own company selling software to end users and effectively becoming a reseller.

Thanks!
#hard #reseller #software
  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    Originally Posted by dreamer123 View Post

    I sell hardware and software for a living and I'm particularly good at selling software (not boasting but I just am ) especially in the cybersecurity market.

    My question is how hard is to become a software reseller. I hope to start my own company selling software to end users and effectively becoming a reseller.

    Thanks!
    It is not difficult at all. Finding someone willing to allow you to sell
    is more difficult.

    I would say that covers about 90% of different types.
    The other % are limited to who can sell by franchise rights
    and legalities ( emergency software - root software for emergency systems
    are ( or were ) regulated ) and you need a special lic to deal sell / maintain them.

    Any specific questions? I happen to be a software vendor as well
    as a reseller and patent lessor.
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    • Profile picture of the author dreamer123
      Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

      It is not difficult at all. Finding someone willing to allow you to sell
      is more difficult.

      I would say that covers about 90% of different types.
      The other % are limited to who can sell by franchise rights
      and legalities ( emergency software - root software for emergency systems
      are ( or were ) regulated ) and you need a special lic to deal sell / maintain them.

      Any specific questions? I happen to be a software vendor as well
      as a reseller and patent lessor.
      Thanks very much for replying. Firstly, as your a software vendor what sort of software do you produce and let's say I want to sell CRM software for example how do I get started as a one man bad or is this not possible?
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  • Profile picture of the author TrumpiaTim
    Generally not that difficult, there's a lot of companies that will allow you to easily white label their software. The difficult part would actually making a successful business out of your white label platform which will largely be contingent upon your sales skills and network.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tam Chancellor
    I used to be a software reseller. Technically, I was a VAR (value added reseller). It was not in the cyber security market. It was fairly easy for me to be be a VAR especially since I had about 10 years of experience in the vendor's target market. I paid a fee and attended training for a few days at the company. The training took place in Tempe, AZ during the summer. It was unbearably hot. I haven't been back to AZ since.

    Most of the VARs didn't make any money from their affiliation. The vendor did get a nice fee though. Many VARs left their customers hanging with no support when they went out of business. That was a big part of my company. I reached out to a lot of abandoned buyers and turned them into clients.
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    "What you do speaks so loud I cannot hear what you say." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    • Profile picture of the author dreamer123
      Originally Posted by Tam Chancellor View Post

      I used to be a software reseller. Technically, I was a VAR (value added reseller). It was not in the cyber security market. It was fairly easy for me to be be a VAR especially since I had about 10 years of experience in the vendor's target market. I paid a fee and attended training for a few days at the company. The training took place in Tempe, AZ during the summer. It was unbearably hot. I haven't been back to AZ since.

      Most of the VARs didn't make any money from their affiliation. The vendor did get a nice fee though. Many VARs left their customers hanging with no support when they went out of business. That was a big part of my company. I reached out to a lot of abandoned buyers and turned them into clients.
      Yeah technically I want to become a VAR and start off as a one man band. Do you think this is realistically achieveable?

      It seems like your implying that reselling software is not going to be a profitable venture? Am I correct?
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      • Profile picture of the author Tam Chancellor
        It's very achievable. I was a sole proprietor. My vendor even offered customer support. I rarely had problems related to the software. I got a lot of general computer questions which let to me offering computer workshops. I didn't know networking so I partnered up with a networking guy.

        It was extremely profitable. I hit the ground running because I went after orphaned accounts. I also sold 10,000 units to a doctor with overseas connections.

        I stopped because my quality of life wasn't good. I made great money. Doctors are notorious for being slow to pay. One chiropractor called me everyday about billing because he knew I had worked for insurance companies. I jacked up my support rates because of him. I was young. I would fire him in a heartbeat now.

        Anyway...my Dad was diagnosed with terminal cancer. I sold my book of business and returned home to be with him during his last months.
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        "What you do speaks so loud I cannot hear what you say." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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        • Profile picture of the author GlenH
          Marketing software products is an evergreen market.

          There will always be a market for quality, reputable software, as long as it's software that people want.

          I've seen so many plugins and other software products released onto the market this year, that were total dogs and filled with bugs.
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          • Profile picture of the author dreamer123
            Originally Posted by GlenH View Post

            Marketing software products is an evergreen market.

            There will always be a market for quality, reputable software, as long as it's software that people want.

            I've seen so many plugins and other software products released onto the market this year, that were total dogs and filled with bugs.
            Hi thanks for your reply! What is the best software to sell at the moment in your opinion especially in the b2b market place?
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            • Profile picture of the author GlenH
              Originally Posted by dreamer123 View Post

              Hi thanks for your reply! What is the best software to sell at the moment in your opinion especially in the b2b market place?
              There is no 'best' software to sell.

              Every market is very different.

              The skill is you need to watch the market you're in closely, see what they have problems with, and work out an automated solution.

              It might be software to automate a task (or a number of tasks).

              For example I watched how marketers were building their lists.

              I found that just about everyone was doing the same thing to build a list, and that was to use 'squeeze pages'.

              So I worked out a different' and better way, and I build a software application around the idea.

              You can't 'teach' someone how to come up with ideas for software.

              You either have the skills to do it, or you don't
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        • Profile picture of the author dreamer123
          Originally Posted by Tam Chancellor View Post

          It's very achievable. I was a sole proprietor. My vendor even offered customer support. I rarely had problems related to the software. I got a lot of general computer questions which let to me offering computer workshops. I didn't know networking so I partnered up with a networking guy.

          It was extremely profitable. I hit the ground running because I went after orphaned accounts. I also sold 10,000 units to a doctor with overseas connections.

          I stopped because my quality of life wasn't good. I made great money. Doctors are notorious for being slow to pay. One chiropractor called me everyday about billing because he knew I had worked for insurance companies. I jacked up my support rates because of him. I was young. I would fire him in a heartbeat now.

          Anyway...my Dad was diagnosed with terminal cancer. I sold my book of business and returned home to be with him during his last months.
          Thanks ever so much for your reply and sorry to hear about your dad. It's good to know there are still some good people out there like yourself.

          If you were to start all over again what software would you sell. I only have experience in the cynersecurity market place which is a good space to be in and I was thinking about becoming a reseller for someone like CrashPlan or Druva. What do you think?
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          • Profile picture of the author Tam Chancellor
            Originally Posted by dreamer123 View Post


            If you were to start all over again what software would you sell. I only have experience in the cynersecurity market place which is a good space to be in and I was thinking about becoming a reseller for someone like CrashPlan or Druva. What do you think?
            I didn't intend to be a VAR. I fell into it. I started an electronic billing service. I got a few clients, but most doctors wanted to know about the software I was using. This was the late 90's and most doctors weren't billing the insurance companies electronically. I had several years (more than a decade) experience in the medical insurance industry. I worked for the large insurance agencies. Most people would recognize their names. I also worked on the other side...for medical groups and hospitals. I knew my resume would get me in the door.

            I would never sell software to doctors and chiropractors again. I don't like those niches. I don't know if I would sell any software again. I'm in a difference place now. I focus on offline (marketing) consulting.

            I don't know anything about cyber security software or vendors. I would say go for it especially if you have experience and enjoy it. It's a hot industry. Pick a niche that you will enjoy working with. Choose your clients carefully. Talk to current VARs that are not in your area. They are usually upfront and honest about the quality of the program and vendor support. Don't depend on leads from the vendor. I received a few leads from my vendor, but I generated 95% of my leads.
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            "What you do speaks so loud I cannot hear what you say." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Gylseth
    What kind of software would you like to sell - or more importantly - what kind of businesses/industry would you like to work with as clients?

    You don't have to restrict yourself to one type of software if you run your own company. You'll quickly find that a company has various needs and that your software might solve many of them, but combined with one or two more would solve most all of them. Depending on who you want to sell for it may be fairly easy to be approved as a VAR, or it may be a tougher process to be approved as some may require fees, licenses, certain industry backgrounds, etc. It's absolutely doable, but I would start with what you feel comfortable with as well as where you find the lower barriers to entry.

    Depending on what direction you want to take, we might even have some alternatives that may interest you.
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    • Profile picture of the author dreamer123
      Originally Posted by Chris Gylseth View Post

      What kind of software would you like to sell - or more importantly - what kind of businesses/industry would you like to work with as clients?

      You don't have to restrict yourself to one type of software if you run your own company. You'll quickly find that a company has various needs and that your software might solve many of them, but combined with one or two more would solve most all of them. Depending on who you want to sell for it may be fairly easy to be approved as a VAR, or it may be a tougher process to be approved as some may require fees, licenses, certain industry backgrounds, etc. It's absolutely doable, but I would start with what you feel comfortable with as well as where you find the lower barriers to entry.

      Depending on what direction you want to take, we might even have some alternatives that may interest you.
      I would be very intrested in hearing about what you provide. And typically, where do you find the lowest barriers to entry?

      Ideally I would like to sell something in the cybersecurify market place like Druva, CrashPlan or LogRhthym for example as its a hot field.

      I tell you what; I would really like to sell salesforce CRM.
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