The Order of a Direct Mail Campaign

2 replies
1) Find the audience first.
2) Write the sales letter to exactly cater for that audience.
3) Finally make the product that matches the sales letter that caters for that audience.

Some may find it strange to make the sales letter before the product, but I think it makes sense. Thoughts?
#campaign #direct #mail #order
  • Profile picture of the author Paul St Jacques
    If you're talking about information products, I would definitely make the product first, before writing the sales letter. Here's why:

    When developing an info-product, you're likely going to sway from your original outline. Things that you originally intended on having, will disappear, and other parts will make their way in that weren't originally planned.

    It'll be tedious to go back and change an already written sales letter to reflect the changes that will happen to your product. I haven't heard of anyone (including myself) following 100% of their original product outline without changing some modules/lessons along the way.

    I personally find it easier to write a sales letter once I have a completed product, as the material is already there for you to get inspiration from. And you'll probably be more enthusiastic and authentic in your sales copy because you're excited about your completed product, instead of writing about something that doesn't exist yet. It'll come through in your copy.

    Regarding #1, "Find the audience first" - you're going to want to do research of course, and with direct mail the targeting can be extremely laser focused, so you won't have a hard time finding a list of your ideal prospects.

    I do recommend validating your idea first, though. You could do some lead generation to the audience you intend on selling your product to. It requires much less effort and you can check if your market is responsive or not. Write up a free report, send some postcards offering the free report (could be sending prospects online, or to call a recorded 1-800 number)

    Split test a few different postcards, get the language and messaging right, and if you're pleased with the response, then you can send a (more expensive) sales letter to your list. It's always good and recommended to do repeat mailings anyway.

    And the leads you generated with your postcards, who are now warmer, will also respond better to the sales letter, so keep that in mind.
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  • Profile picture of the author SashaLee
    Originally Posted by myattitude View Post

    1) Find the audience first.
    2) Write the sales letter to exactly cater for that audience.
    3) Finally make the product that matches the sales letter that caters for that audience.

    Some may find it strange to make the sales letter before the product, but I think it makes sense. Thoughts?
    Hi there,

    Your point #2 is too vague, as is your post in general. You're writing as though a direct mail campaign should stand on its own. Those of us who do this for a living know that direct mail is merely one limb of a multi-faceted tree - that's if you actually want to maximize the direct mail campaign and get your money's worth.

    You are also describing a scenario that in 15 years I have not seen exist. Nobody has come to our agency and asked, "Write me a sales letter for X market, then I'll make the product". I think this may work for info-products but for the real world this is a dream.

    All the best,

    Sasha
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