Grant Cardone's Favorite Closes

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Grant Cardone is using Twitter's Periscope better than anyone I've seen so far. Recently he took questions and someone asked what are his favorite closes.

This is what he said -- by the way, to make these work, you have to present your price early in the discussion -- don't wait until the end:

Have you seen enough to make a decision?

Have you seen enough to make a decision on the investment required?

On a scale of 1 to 10, where are we right now?

If you were going to say yes, how would you make sense of this investment?

The product is $60,000. When was the last time you invested $60,000?

How would you justify investing $$60,000?

He said you can learn more from these webinars at WhateverItTakes Network. These are paid products which I don't know anything about. This is not an affiliate link and I have no relationship with the company:

10x Seminar
7 Secrets to Selling
Secrets to Closing the Sale

On-Demand Webinars - #WhateverItTakes
#cardone #closes #favorite #grant
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Joe's post in Bold. Mine not.

    I can't help it. My Salesman's Soul is making me say these things.


    Have you seen enough to make a decision? or
    Have you seen enough to make a decision on the investment required?

    Probably the best of the litter. It sounds a little "Out of a sales book", but not bad. I say "Have you seen enough to own it? Or do you need to see more?". If someone said, "Have you seen enough to make a decision on the investment required?". I would say, "Do you mean, am I ready to buy the car?".

    On a scale of 1 to 10, where are we right now?
    Surprisingly useful.

    I call this my "7UP Close". Somewhere toward the end of the presentation, I say, "Just based on what you've seen so far, On a scale of one to ten...one being no interest, and ten meaning you've already decided to buy....where are you?". If they say"7" or higher, I continue. If they say "Six" or lower, I know I'm not winning the battle.. I can't remember ever closing a person that said "Six" or less.

    I say "Just based on what you've seen so far..." because it means I'm not done. there is more value to come.

    If you were going to say yes, how would you make sense of this investment?
    The product is $60,000. When was the last time you invested $60,000?
    How would you justify investing $$60,000?


    Maybe car sales is different. If I were asked these questions, I would think the guy was unprepared. I may not even answer the question. My thought would be, "What difference does it make?"

    Maybe they work better, because some car buyers are "in heat". i don't know.

    My usual close is, "Is that what you want?" or "Is that OK?". But I ask when I'm 99% sure the answer is "Yes".

    Car sales is different. The training is different, the mentality is different. It's the only niche where I won't speak to a group of salespeople. The culture is too different. So...maybe these closes are the real deal. Maybe they actually propel the sale. I tend to think that they only work if the person has definitely already decided to buy.

    But I don't sell cars.

    Oh, and...the sale is made before the close. The sales is made before the close. The close is just a detail, like asking if they are warm enough...or if they are thirsty.

    A close can't take someone who doesn't want to buy...and make them want to buy. Just for the newbies out there.

    One huge mistake I see salespeople make, is reading a scripted (and sounds scripted) close, that sounds completely different from the way the salesperson has been talking. Do people really say, "If you were going to say yes, how would you make sense of this investment?" in real conversation? I don't.
    People really do say, "Is this the car you want?". And you don't sound like you just read a Zig Ziglar book.

    Great acting, is sounding completely normal and impromptu. For some reason, sales trainers (even the best) feel it necessary to elaborate in their scripts, beyond what they really say themselves. So, everything begins to sound like Shakespeare.....instead of a conversation between two friends.


    If it was a customer, without their spouse, I may see asking, "How would you justify investing $60,000.....without talking to your husband/wife?". To really lock the sale in.
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    Hi Claude,

    I got a bit lost here....IS it car sales?...how did you know as I can't see any reference to car sales?

    If I even used a word like 'invest' when selling cars the customer would think I was mad!
    Cars are metal that depreciates...NOT the kind of thing a person would 'invest' in. They may enjoy owning a particular car but everyone knows it would be wrong to call it an investment!!
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by helisell View Post

      Hi Claude,

      I got a bit lost here....IS it car sales?...how did you know as I can't see any reference to car sales?

      If I even used a word like 'invest' when selling cars the customer would think I was mad!
      Cars are metal that depreciates...NOT the kind of thing a person would 'invest' in. They may enjoy owning a particular car but everyone knows it would be wrong to call it an investment!!

      I assumed it was car sales, because Grant Cardone is a car sales trainer/coach/guru. That's all I was going on.
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  • Profile picture of the author eccj
    Don't say "when is the last time you spent xx,xxx" unless you know they have spent that much on something less important than what you are selling.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
    Ever since studying the "Secrets to Closing the Sale" webinar in Dec 14. My closing rate has increased multiple times! I'm now a strong closer rather than a conversationalist.

    I had a client that was resisting taking the next step forward, he gave me all the excuses but I was too prepared for him. Stay strong in the close and you will close deals.
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    Thanks Claude.....old age creeping in....easily confused these days

    ....where's that darn mouse got to now....mumble mumble tut tut
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by helisell View Post

      Thanks Claude.....old age creeping in....easily confused these days

      ....where's that darn mouse got to now....mumble mumble tut tut
      Not at all.

      This isn't about Cardone,, or any specific sales trainer....

      But something I see from "Niche specific sales trainers", is wanting to branch out to a more general audience. there are two ways to do that;
      1) Try to adapt their specific skills to a broader audience.
      2) Replace their core training with generic training that they think will be more easily accepted.

      For example, a retail sales trainer named John Lawhon wrote the masterpiece Selling Retail. I've never read anything close to the sheer brilliance..on retail selling...than what was in this book.

      Lawhon then wrote The Selling Bible. A well written book. But he was now out of his element, and tried to apply his retail selling to general selling. It's just wasn't great training.

      It's pretty easy for me to spot the "general sales" materials, that are replacing the niche specific materials. They all include the same general ideas as the top 10 sales books....

      And the dialog they suggest is never anything that you would hear from a real person.

      As an analogy. animation doesn't look real. Even if there are real actors, and the animation is based on their movements. It doesn't look real.

      In the same way, authors give "Sales speak" as real technique. But these are never anything you would hear from a real salesperson, at least not a sane one.

      Books on "elevator speeches" are like that. They give dialog that is from a badly written brochure. Have you ever asked someone what they did for a living...and they said something like, "I work for diverse corporations to maximize and augment their corporate profit portfolio, while mitigating any loss of potential revenue"?

      Neither have I. But every book I read on "Elevator speeches" or USPs" is like that.

      It's like learning how to act, by watching cartoons.
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      • Profile picture of the author eccj
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Books on "elevator speeches" are like that. They give dialog that is from a badly written brochure. Have you ever asked someone what they did for a living...and they said something like, "I work for diverse corporations to maximize and augment their corporate profit portfolio, while mitigating any loss of potential revenue"?

        Neither have I. But every book I read on "Elevator speeches" or USPs" is like that.

        It's like learning how to act, by watching cartoons.
        Great points.

        I have heard a few women give the elevator speech response when I asked what they do. This was a few years ago but I remember one woman in particular saying she was some kind of "diva."

        I felt embarrassed for her and for myself.... I mean what I'm I supposed to say after that when she asks me what I do? Uhhhh...... I sell life and disability insurance....like a pop star.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by eccj View Post

          Great points.

          I have heard a few women give the elevator speech response when I asked what they do. This was a few years ago but I remember one woman in particular saying she was some kind of "diva."

          I felt embarrassed for her and for myself.... I mean what I'm I supposed to say after that when she asks me what I do? Uhhhh...... I sell life and disability insurance....like a pop star.
          For years, I would say "I'm in sales"...without saying "I sell vacuum cleaners". And then, one day, I decided to just say what i do. And I would say, "I sell high end vacuum cleaners".

          And you know what? Over the years, I've sold maybe $10,000 worth of vacuums, just by telling people that. These were vacuums I sold in people's homes.

          Today, I own a retail store....and when someone locally asks what I do, I say "I sell $800 vacuum cleaners for $399". Yes, It generates sales, every month.


          I was at a Dan Kennedy event a few years ago. I was getting into the elevator on the 25th floor (I think). Another guy got in with me. I was still half asleep, and leaned against all the buttons. Yup, the door opened on every floor.....all the way down.

          The guy says, "So....what do you do?" I said, "I supply quality leads and sales, to business owners who already have a website?'.

          He said, "what's that mean?'

          I said, "Do you have customers that told you that they found you online?"

          He said, "Sure".

          I said, "Do you want more of them?" (still half asleep)

          He laughed (because of the offhanded way I said it), and said, "Yeah, I do want more".

          I said, "Then I suppose, when we get off this elevator, we should talk".

          He said, "Did you push all those buttons on purpose?"

          I said, No, but I might, in the future".

          And...yup, he bought my program, at the event.
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      • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Neither have I. But every book I read on "Elevator speeches" or USPs" is like that.

        It's like learning how to act, by watching cartoons.
        Another soul-killing item is the moronic "mission statement" that never sounds like anything real.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

          Another soul-killing item is the moronic "mission statement" that never sounds like anything real.

          I know. But nearly every "Marketing" speaker talks about....your USP and your Mission Statement. No idea why, other than they are easy to talk about.
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          • Profile picture of the author misterme
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Great acting, is sounding completely normal and impromptu. For some reason, sales trainers (even the best) feel it necessary to elaborate in their scripts, beyond what they really say themselves. So, everything begins to sound like Shakespeare.....instead of a conversation between two friends.
            Methinks thou dost protest too much.
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            • Profile picture of the author CLSVentures
              In my own opinion (with the disclaimer that it's not even worth $.02), I'm not a Cardone fan. His arrogance and personality immediately make him someone that would probably never close me and leave me feeling like he really solved my problem and added value. I'd kind of feel like I'd been hosed, if you know what I mean. Maybe it's the car-sales side of him.

              Even most of those closes are not something I'd dream of using in my realm. I deal offline, and if I'm trying to lead a business owner or C-level to feel I'm going to bring them thousands of dollars of value with what I do, then the last thing I want to do is appear to "sell" them. I can't imagine asking a VP what number he was on a 1-10 of how interested he was in my product. The first couple closes I can see having some value, with regards to "have you seen enough to make a decision" type stuff.

              But I do agree he's on the Periscope platform early and will definitely make good use of it. I tuned in to a couple of his and they were somewhat interesting....I just can't take the guy for very long. He would be a phenomenal car salesman. But if I had to drive from LA to NY in the same car as him.....I'd run over him at the first gas stop or push him out before the AZ line.
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Does anyone know Cardone's actual car sales experience? Or in field sales experience?

                I know, when I listen to Jordan Belfort's course, that he's said the exact things he teaches....thousands and thousands of times, to make real sales....regardless of what I think of him personally.
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                • Profile picture of the author eccj
                  Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                  Does anyone know Cardone's actual car sales experience? Or in field sales experience?

                  I know, when I listen to Jordan Belfort's course, that he's said the exact things he teaches....thousands and thousands of times, to make real sales....regardless of what I think of him personally.
                  He said he was an ok car salesman. I bet he was pretty good though.

                  A lot of sales trainers say how they sucked at sales, just like you people, until they saw the light. Now, for a limited time, they will share with you the light.... bla bla.

                  I think he started consulting car dealerships at a pretty young age if I remember correctly. Obviously he had a lot of success selling dealerships on his program.

                  I actually like Cardone..... don't hate the player, hate the game right?

                  That all being said; car sales is kind of an odd game. It's a really big purchase yet it is retail. Consumers hate the salesman before they get out of the car. They all know the price of the cars yet they still want it cheaper... even if they really want the car.

                  Yes, sales is sales but car sales has it's own intricacies. When it comes to car sales closing is way more important than in other type of sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    I like "The Elevator Close", Claude. One could modify it to how many
    buttons they think they need to push based on the client's interest. Push more
    buttons as needed. LOL

    Grant is not really my style personality and appearance wise. I have to work
    around that to learn something. He reminds of the type of car sales guy
    who tried to get me to buy a pinkish colored truck that was not an extra cab.

    I did come across one used car salesman who was just a nice guy to talk to.
    He had such a clientele and referral base set up that he had a relaxed "don't
    care, gonna' sell 28 to 30 cars this month anyway" attitude.

    I know car sales is different, but I always think that if they made it the kind of
    experience that someone would repeat, and refer their young, adult daughters...,
    they would pretty much have it made in the shade. How many cars have you
    bought, and how many people do you know who buy cars?

    With respect to Grant, I wonder who is the marketing genius behind the scenes
    to help him gain ground on the multimedia/internet/TV as a coach/consultant?

    Dan
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    • Profile picture of the author eccj
      Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

      With respect to Grant, I wonder who is the marketing genius behind the scenes
      to help him gain ground on the multimedia/internet/TV as a coach/consultant?

      Dan
      He is a Scientologist and is married to an actress which can't hurt.
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        • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
          Originally Posted by Naren Blaice View Post

          OK. Made for TV and all, but I liked him there. Thanks for posting.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            This morning, I was talking to my friend, the guru to home inspectors. I mentioned the conversation on this forum, and asked, "If your original business was just moderately successful, how did you become the "Go to guy" in the niche?". It isn't something we normally discuss.

            His answer was the perfect answer. He said something like, "When you become a coach, you attract the top people. They each have proven...highly profitable systems in place. I study them. I study all of them. So it's really my client's information that I'm teaching. And it's all tested and proven."

            That made perfect sense to me.
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            • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              This morning, I was talking to my friend, the guru to home inspectors. I mentioned the conversation on this forum, and asked, "If your original business was just moderately successful, how did you become the "Go to guy" in the niche?". It isn't something we normally discuss.

              His answer was the perfect answer. He said something like, "When you become a coach, you attract the top people. They each have proven...highly profitable systems in place. I study them. I study all of them. So it's really my client's information that I'm teaching. And it's all tested and proven."

              That made perfect sense to me.
              When I was pitching a group of department heads my Organizational Development services,
              I got feedback from my contact that one of the things they really did not like in my
              presentation was that I used too many examples of what "I" did on various projects.

              I don't think I presented in a bragging manner, just meant to provide models that
              they could extrapolate from, or reverse engineer.

              So, I guess that it is a rare talent to be able take information and apply it or teach it
              as these coaches/consultants do. Especially from a different field and modify it to
              work in another field.

              As I mentioned, I'm curious who is behind Grant and helping him with the cutting edge
              information and tactics. For example, as Joe Golfer mentioned, he is using Twitter
              Periscope better than anybody.

              I just enjoy finding out stuff like Jay Abraham was behind the scenes with Tony Robbins
              and the Chicken Soup for the Soul series...

              I sure wish I had more time to learn and learn, and had really good minions to keep me
              abreast of things.

              Dan
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              • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
                Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post


                As I mentioned, I'm curious who is behind Grant and helping him with the cutting edge
                information and tactics. For example, as Joe Golfer mentioned, he is using Twitter
                Periscope better than anybody.

                Dan
                He says in the beginning he wasn't too tech savvy, but eventually saw the potential and decided to "make Twitter my b." He explains it in this interview with Lewis Howes. (The link should go right to the segment, but if not click to 16:50).

                This was a few years ago, but it gives some perspective on his approach to social media (FB, Twitter, etc) and new media (podcasts, hangouts, etc.).

                http://youtu.be/5fMKMZUzREs?t=16m50s

                Here are a few excerpts:

                -"The first title of my book 'If You're Not First, You're Last" was "Quit Being a Little B."

                -"With social media you must dominate. People say I am posting too much on Twitter. You must push so violently on social media you are hated. If you are not getting any haters, you are not getting attention. Here is the sequence: You must be so dominant you get Attention --> Criticism --> Hate --> Admiration. If you take enough action and dominate, they will come around."

                -"Most people write their goals down once a year at best. I write my goals down twice a day."

                -"A lot of sales books are garbage. Some of these authors are hurting the business. NLP, for example, is manipulative. We approach sales differently. Ethics are key. We get to the point and believe in fast sales cycles. We don't spend a lot of time with people."
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                • Profile picture of the author johntoll
                  Has anyone been pitched for a product by Cardone and his sales people?

                  I have. I filled out a form online for some information. Next thing I know they started contacting me. They were pretty damn good and almost sold me on a product that I really wasn't interested in. I have been pitched by a lot of people on different things. They were the best so far.

                  I learned a few things from being pitched by them too.
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                • Profile picture of the author eccj
                  Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post


                  -"A lot of sales books are garbage. Some of these authors are hurting the business. NLP, for example, is manipulative. We approach sales differently. Ethics are key. We get to the point and believe in fast sales cycles. We don't spend a lot of time with people."
                  That is what I like about Cardone. His system gets to the point! Get to the freakin' point people!

                  I have done a lot of joint work with people that take forever in a meeting and then need three more meetings. It drives me crazy.

                  I have a super laid back personality; very non threatening ,no Grant Cardone by any stretch of the imagination. Yet, I still manage to go quick. People are not sick of me before I leave.

                  I don't feel rushed, my prospects don't seemed rushed. But once you cut out all the yadda yadda yadda you can actually sell stuff pretty quickly.
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                  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                    Originally Posted by eccj View Post

                    That is what I like about Cardone. His system gets to the point! Get to the freakin' point people!

                    I have done a lot of joint work with people that take forever in a meeting and then need three more meetings. It drives me crazy.

                    I have a super laid back personality; very non threatening ,no Grant Cardone by any stretch of the imagination. Yet, I still manage to go quick. People are not sick of me before I leave.

                    I don't feel rushed, my prospects don't seemed rushed. But once you cut out all the yadda yadda yadda you can actually sell stuff pretty quickly.
                    If you aren't "in" the money around the 20 minute mark,
                    your wasting everyone's time.

                    ... large ticket phone sales
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    Ha Ha some great posts in this one.

    I specialised in retail car sales training for years. I tried hard to only teach
    what I would use myself but whenever i got involved in a sale in the
    dealerships I would get asked later 'why didn't you tell us about that line you used?'

    My answer was usually...why? what did i say?

    Just shows that when you've done it successfully for a long time it mostly
    becomes sub-conscious.

    As a matter of interest, and since this thread started about closing (I think)
    my commonest close was 'so Fred do you like this car enough to actually buy it....i mean assuming we can agree a deal? If they said no....All I ever came back with was 'WHY?'

    They would fall over themselves to tell me what would need to happen to turn this into a deal.

    Very easy to do when you have experience but a bum clencher the first time you do it.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Based on consumer studies, how long should it take to sell the average car?

    I've been through processes with "good" guy and "bad" guy dealers that make me
    want Gorilla brand duct tape for my brain.
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    • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
      Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

      Based on consumer studies, how long should it take to sell the average car?

      I've been through processes with "good" guy and "bad" guy dealers that make me
      want Gorilla brand duct tape for my brain.
      As a nerd, I was one of the first people showing up in showrooms to buy a car back in the day with lots of information from the internet.

      I remember one sales guy in Montebello, CA, questioning me as if I had done something wrong: "Where did you get this information?"

      "On the internet, " I said.

      He started waving his arms and yelling loudly through the dealership, "You hear that! He got it on the Internet! The Internet! The G-D Internet!" People were looking at us through the glass wall of his office next to the showroom.

      I think he retired early.
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    • Profile picture of the author eccj
      Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

      Based on consumer studies, how long should it take to sell the average car?

      I've been through processes with "good" guy and "bad" guy dealers that make me
      want Gorilla brand duct tape for my brain.
      it takes 3 hours.....

      Cardone says that the dealerships that use his system get the people out the door in something like an hour and a half, maybe less.
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      • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
        Originally Posted by eccj View Post

        it takes 3 hours.....

        Cardone says that the dealerships that use his system get the people out the door in something like an hour and a half, maybe less.
        Hour and a half or less sound much more optimal. And I think dealers should go for what consumers consider optimal and as pleasant a process as possible.
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        • Profile picture of the author eccj
          Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

          Hour and a half or less sound much more optimal. And I think dealers should go for what consumers consider optimal and as pleasant a process as possible.
          I have been around the car business most of my life so I speak from experience.

          It takes a good salesman, desk manager, finance manager, and sales manager to pull that off. Also, you need the cooperation of the customer.

          I have spent a good amount, not a ton, of time on the lot taking "ups" and observing how the process works. The customers drag the salesman around the lot trying to avoid him, not answering questions, not hinting at a car they like, not wanting to test drive, not wanting to get a price even though they demand the "best price," and on and on.

          The desk manager doesn't trust his salesmen to do the job right so he wants the salesmen to go through the whole process; get a commitment and stupid stuff like that that waste time.

          The used car manager doesn't want to get off his ass to get a trade in value unless he knows that he has to, meaning, not until a deal is imminent.

          It's crazy how long it takes but a lot of it is because customers have been trained to take that long because they think it will get them a good deal.

          Cardone's system tells the customer:

          We are going to get you all the numbers for you to look at, if you have any interest in trading your car in anywhere I would like to get my manager to take a look at your car and get you it's value.

          while he is doing that I need you to drive the car to see if you like it.

          When you come back we will have all the numbers ready for you.

          It is a great system but it takes a lot of people not being lazy bums to pull off.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    Wanted to quote a few people but...

    just thought I'd weigh in because it's easier...

    Buying cars...or more importantly "Owning the Marque" is
    a great opportunity to use polarisation techniques to sort
    passionate fans of the "brand" and focus on those people.

    Yes you can convert people to a brand but it is easiest to think of
    how a Church or a Cult works and fill the front rows first and then work back.

    If someone comes in and wants to compare brands...just...don't bother because the chance of you converting them is pretty slim....

    Once someone is committed to a brand the sale is easy.

    As a matter of interest, and since this thread started about closing (I think)
    my commonest close was 'so Fred do you like this car enough to actually buy it....i mean assuming we can agree a deal? If they said no....All I ever came back with was 'WHY?'
    I'd even use this approach earlier to get rid of people who are just tire kickers.

    I think a lot of people fail to recognise that a person who is in your business looking at anything is "In the market".

    There is no delay...

    There is only action towards the outcome.

    The negotiation of a mutually beneficial outcome,

    For any transaction to happen the "buyer" must believe what he is transferring his wealth for is something that is "worth more" than what the seller is asking for it.

    I had a great cold "Walk In" caller on me lately who was trying to sell electricity. I was already with his company...but I wanted to study his pitch and see if there was something I could glean...

    He shared with me how his family in New Zealand sold cars.

    A few months back he was in the market for a new car, a Toyota Yaris, ...he'd done all his research and that was what he needed to run around town.

    NOW...here is the inside knowledge.

    He knew that a Car salesman was trying to make budget at the end of the month...

    He knew that he could time his approach to benefit his outcome.

    He timed his approach to 4pm on a Friday tat was the last day of the month.

    He had cash to do the deal.

    The price everywhere was $17K Aussie.

    He offered $11K and was very prepared to walk away...

    He got the car for $11K and "Gifted" the salesman another $1K for the obligatory accessories...seat covers, headlight protectors etc...

    There is plenty of money in cars.

    If you sell anything you are best to sell to people who already want what you've got.

    Trying to sell to people who are "just looking"...is not a particularly profitable strategy.
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    • Profile picture of the author eccj
      Originally Posted by Oziboomer View Post

      Wanted to quote a few people but...

      just thought I'd weigh in because it's easier...

      Buying cars...or more importantly "Owning the Marque" is
      a great opportunity to use polarisation techniques to sort
      passionate fans of the "brand" and focus on those people.

      Yes you can convert people to a brand but it is easiest to think of
      how a Church or a Cult works and fill the front rows first and then work back.

      If someone comes in and wants to compare brands...just...don't bother because the chance of you converting them is pretty slim....

      Once someone is committed to a brand the sale is easy.



      I'd even use this approach earlier to get rid of people who are just tire kickers.

      I think a lot of people fail to recognise that a person who is in your business looking at anything is "In the market".

      There is no delay...

      There is only action towards the outcome.

      The negotiation of a mutually beneficial outcome,

      For any transaction to happen the "buyer" must believe what he is transferring his wealth for is something that is "worth more" than what the seller is asking for it.

      I had a great cold "Walk In" caller on me lately who was trying to sell electricity. I was already with his company...but I wanted to study his pitch and see if there was something I could glean...

      He shared with me how his family in New Zealand sold cars.

      A few months back he was in the market for a new car, a Toyota Yaris, ...he'd done all his research and that was what he needed to run around town.

      NOW...here is the inside knowledge.

      He knew that a Car salesman was trying to make budget at the end of the month...

      He knew that he could time his approach to benefit his outcome.

      He timed his approach to 4pm on a Friday tat was the last day of the month.

      He had cash to do the deal.

      The price everywhere was $17K Aussie.

      He offered $11K and was very prepared to walk away...

      He got the car for $11K and "Gifted" the salesman another $1K for the obligatory accessories...seat covers, headlight protectors etc...

      There is plenty of money in cars.

      If you sell anything you are best to sell to people who already want what you've got.

      Trying to sell to people who are "just looking"...is not a particularly profitable strategy.
      I have a really hard time believing the kid got that great of a deal. If he did then there was something seriously wrong with the car or the dealership was about to hit a GIANT bonus and they needed to sell a car before close.

      The thing about selling cars is that you have to sell to people that are just looking for a deal. The manufacturers won't put up with a dealer just selling cars for big profit.

      Even if people love the car they still want a great deal. Subaru has great customer loyalty and the margins to the dealer still suck out loud.

      Why? Well their love of the brand doesn't mean they will love the dealership. Like I said earlier, they hate the salesman before they even lay eyes on him. They want the best deal or else they will just go to another dealership that offers the same car.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        For the 35 years I was selling in home, except for the last few years...every prospect had taken a solemn vow...not to buy from me. Every sale was fighting against the current. Like swimming up a waterfall. I still sold a little more than half (except for the first year or so).

        The last few years I was selling in people's homes...I only went to referrals from buyers and past customers. More than 80% bought. But it was selling with the current, not against it.

        When I opened my retail store, maybe 80-85% of the sales I made were to people coming in to buy some minor item, or coming in for a repair. Most of my sales weren't to ready buyers.

        Sure, they took longer, but I still made the sales.

        Now, partly because of marketing, and mostly out of lack of effort...nearly all my retail sales are to people coming in to buy.

        Monday, I decided to create a couple of sales from non-buyers. So, two people came in for a $3 belt, and each walked out with a vacuum cleaner. One for $699 and one for $899.

        Tire Kickers? I would have loved to talk to tire kickers. Want to call yourself a salesman? Sell something to someone asking for directions.
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      • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
        Originally Posted by eccj View Post

        I have a really hard time believing the kid got that great of a deal. If he did then there was something seriously wrong with the car or the dealership was about to hit a GIANT bonus and they needed to sell a car before close.
        The buyer of the car was an experienced sales person...not a kid...maybe 50...and was in sales all his life....PLUS he had inside knowledge as to when to hit the car dealer.

        When he told me of the deal I couldn't believe it...but he explained the money for the dealer was in the servicing and other areas.

        I don't doubt what he paid because prices in Oz are hyper-inflated so he knew the outcome he wanted and if he didm;t get it he was prepared to walk away.

        Not a hypothetical sale but one that was completed in favour of the the buyer I suspect,

        I'm not pushing the case but just sharing an observation...

        I work all day, when I'm in the public eye, with people who have come in for something that they perceive is worth $20 and they leave spending many multiple of that.

        The point I was making is that people who desire (and need) what you have will spend more and be easier to sell to..

        As for the car deal I'm going to go in real low just to see the reaction next time.

        If a business is under pressure and they require funds what works??

        Money now...or bankruptcy later???
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Oziboomer View Post

          If a business is under pressure and they require funds what works??

          Money now...or bankruptcy later???
          I used to teach store owner how to buy advertising for 25 cents on the dollar. And much of it had to do with the idea..."The deadline is tomorrow, they haven't filled all the space/pages....your check is staring them in the face....and...what the heck, this one time"


          My local coupon magazine sells a full page ad for $650 It goes to 25,000 homes.

          I pay $125 a page. Why? Because I know that after the 16th page is sold, additional pages are nearly 100% profit. And I'm a guaranteed sale. Similar savings on Newspaper ads.

          Radio discounts are less.

          That's one way to guarantee your ads are profitable. Just pay less for the ad.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Yaris was not a popular seller. End of month, end of year is a good time to negotiate with dealers.
    They like to get rid of the floor plan payments - loan they take out to have inventory.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    ^^^^^^^
    Also, I'm starting the clock from when the customer has selected the car they want.

    Seems like a dealer could get their system down and they could market "here is our
    process" - much like gentle dentists. Of course there will always be difficult customers.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

      ^^^^^^^
      Also, I'm starting the clock from when the customer has selected the car they want.

      Seems like a dealer could get their system down and they could market "here is our
      process" - much like gentle dentists. Of course there will always be difficult customers.
      And that's the problem with every sales funnel. There are enough variables, that a simple system falls apart. For example, I taught a presentation an a close to sell my vacuums. But it almost never went smoothly. There was always something outside the system.

      And at retail, if I'm not the one talking to the customer...it becomes a tour of our store. Vacuum after vacuum after vacuum. And questions that lead to confusion...and the inevitable, "Well, we have a lot to think about now".

      Getting them to land on one or two models is key. And asking the qualifying questions...before you talk about product, is also key.

      It's weird, but selling high end vacuums at retail, is very very similar to selling cars on a lot. I'm still dealing with bargain shoppers, trade-ins, Consumer Report devotees, people who have to talk it over with an absent spouse, and people who will make a decision...at the end of time.

      And, to be honest, it has taken me many years...even after selling in homes for a few decades..to really get the hang of it. The problem is, consumers don't know what's available, what's good or bad, what's a good value, and how to shop....so they wing it. And their script isn't our script.

      So, literally, I've just had to memorize the best responses to hundreds of situations and questions. And I make them feel like they have shopped, just by the qualifying questions, and by comparing 2 or 3 models.....and funneling them down to the one they are starting to show a preference for.
      It's complicated enough, that I could write a book about it...but an employee would take at least a good year to learn it. Just too many ways, it could go off the rails.

      But having a manager, that I would have to get approval from, for every offer? That would drive me crazy.
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      • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
        Sales Sieves

        eccj or Aaron Doud (where has he been?) know more about auto dealers than I, but I do think there are dealers who don't even, or rarely, mess with poor to bad credit, or shakily "self employed" people.
        Schomp dealerships (GM, Honda, BMW), now run by Lisa Schomp. here in Colorado, for example.

        >>>>>>>

        It's sooo long a go, but I think I was dealing with the sales manager at a large dealership.
        He took at least a half hour to tell me what numbers I was going to present to the finance manager.
        "I'll say we asked this much, but you said it was too much, so we offered this much. Please initial here...
        Again and again so on for all that time. I did not buy from them.









        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        And that's the problem with every sales funnel. There are enough variables, that a simple system falls apart. For example, I taught a presentation an a close to sell my vacuums. But it almost never went smoothly. There was always something outside the system.

        And at retail, if I'm not the one talking to the customer...it becomes a tour of our store. Vacuum after vacuum after vacuum. And questions that lead to confusion...and the inevitable, "Well, we have a lot to think about now".

        Getting them to land on one or two models is key. And asking the qualifying questions...before you talk about product, is also key.

        It's weird, but selling high end vacuums at retail, is very very similar to selling cars on a lot. I'm still dealing with bargain shoppers, trade-ins, Consumer Report devotees, people who have to talk it over with an absent spouse, and people who will make a decision...at the end of time.

        And, to be honest, it has taken me many years...even after selling in homes for a few decades..to really get the hang of it. The problem is, consumers don't know what's available, what's good or bad, what's a good value, and how to shop....so they wing it. And their script isn't our script.

        So, literally, I've just had to memorize the best responses to hundreds of situations and questions. And I make them feel like they have shopped, just by the qualifying questions, and by comparing 2 or 3 models.....and funneling them down to the one they are starting to show a preference for.
        It's complicated enough, that I could write a book about it...but an employee would take at least a good year to learn it. Just too many ways, it could go off the rails.

        But having a manager, that I would have to get approval from, for every offer? That would drive me crazy.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

          Sales Sieves

          eccj or Aaron Doud (where has he been?) know more about auto dealers than I, but I do think there are dealers who don't even, or rarely, mess with poor to bad credit, or shakily "self employed" people..
          Bad credit buyers are a gold mine, in cars and in nearly any major sale. In fact, for several months (maybe in the 1980s) I sold mostly bad credit deals. I sold 26 in a row, had the best month in my life, and made enough to buy a small house. Why they are rejected makes no sense to me. In fact, I made a small fortune...for years, primarily from buying the credit turn downs from other sales offices. And amazingly, some in the group, actually have good credit, and don't know it.

          Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

          It's sooo long a go, but I think I was dealing with the sales manager at a large dealership.
          He took at least a half hour to tell me what numbers I was going to present to the finance manager.
          "I'll say we asked this much, but you said it was too much, so we offered this much. Please initial here...
          Again and again so on for all that time. I did not buy from them.
          Words fail me. But yes, I see the same thing in every attempt to buy a car. And in nearly every sales office. It's like every sales organization has a "Department Of Sales Prevention". But I've never talked to a car salesman that didn't make me go through this tedious dance.

          The only time I enjoyed the process was when I was buying a Horizon in the 1990's. I said, "Knock off $500 and we have a deal". The manager said, "No. We only make about $600 on this sale. And for $600, I don't negotiate."

          I laughed out loud, and wrote the check.
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  • It was a masterful hard sell pitch (snag is, they often result in high refunds).

    The pressure is off the moment the phone goes down. The guy goes back to his "default" emotions. The "guilt" close wears off. Buyers remorse kicks in coupled with "will this program really work, can I make it work for me, not sure if I'll be able to, not sure if I can…"

    Remember most people never DO the program they buy. They believe it will work - for others - but not for them.

    Could have been made a lot easier if Cardone had spent a bit more time talking about the benefits of the program - "tried, tested, proven - by everyone in the game" "everything quickly adapts to your personality" "just use the techniques, they'll easily become so natural, you can't help but make tons more sales" etc, etc.

    To me, that's what the guy really wanted to hear.

    Instead of sledge hamming into the "insecurities" (come on - are many of us really going to do that? No. Maybe gently but not with an AK47).

    And rather than casually mention the "I'll give you your money back after a year" he should had highlighted it.

    "You'll never lose, do the program and if you don't make x money the 4 grand comes straight back to you."

    Then the pitch would have gone from ultra high to medium pressure (with the all important "empathy" rather than "antagonism").

    And the sale would still be made.

    With every chance of it sticking.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      It was a masterful hard sell pitch (snag is, they often result in high refunds).

      The pressure is off the moment the phone goes down. The guy goes back to his "default" emotions. The "guilt" close wears off. Buyers remorse kicks in coupled with "will this program really work, can I make it work for me, not sure if I'll be able to, not sure if I can…"

      Remember most people never DO the program they buy. They believe it will work - for others - but not for them.

      Could have been made a lot easier if Cardone had spent a bit more time talking about the benefits of the program - "tried, tested, proven - by everyone in the game" "everything quickly adapts to your personality" "just use the techniques, they'll easily become so natural, you can't help but make tons more sales" etc, etc.

      To me, that's what the guy really wanted to hear.

      Instead of sledge hamming into the "insecurities" (come on - are many of us really going to do that? No. Maybe gently but not with an AK47).

      And rather than casually mention the "I'll give you your money back after a year" he should had highlighted it.

      "You'll never lose, do the program and if you don't make x money the 4 grand comes straight back to you."

      Then the pitch would have gone from ultra high to medium pressure (with the all important "empathy" rather than "antagonism").

      And the sale would still be made.

      With every chance of it sticking.


      Steve
      We don't know what was said after the credit card was given. Sure, if that was the end of it, the guy would cancel. But another 10 minutes, letting off the steam, and it would be solid.

      I think the guy needed strong handling. And the close was very good. But, if the customers isn't reassured after the sale, And maybe "What are you going to tell your wife when she asks about this?'....the guy goes back to his default position (like you said) I was assuming that the original rep was far more gentle with him. More of the sme, may not have done it. A firm hand, from the right person, is sometimes the shortest distance to a sales (or a definite "No").

      These really hard closed sales will stick, but it's all in how the customer is handled immediately after they buy. I mean while they are still on the phone.

      I've never been quite so abrasive in selling vacuums (but close)..but selling a course to another salesman? Absolutely. It also matters a lot if the prospect is responding to it. Some prospects will crack, or shy away. But if you can see that what you are saying is what he guy needs to make a decision......and he's responding to it.....

      The guy can always...always say "No". But he didn't, because he really wanted to do this.

      I hope Cardone's training is all it's supposed to be. If it is, Cardone just did the guy a huge favor. But listening to Cardone do his job....inspires me. Cardone reminded me of a very strong coach.
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  • Claude,

    A very good point - it was a salesman selling a selling course to a salesman (aka SSASCTAS - fair to say that acronym has never been written before).

    Maybe in these rather exclusive circumstances the pressure can be ramped up way past boiling point.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    Another thing many don't realize is how much Cardone talks (in his books, anyway) about providing service after the sale.

    He says he closes hard and fast because:
    a) He has a full pipeline.
    b) He works hard on providing outstanding service.

    The good service is part of his close, saying in effect, "You get ME in the deal, which no one else can offer, so let's just do this." He is his own Unique Selling Proposition.
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    • Profile picture of the author eccj
      Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

      Another thing many don't realize is how much Cardone talks (in his books, anyway) about providing service after the sale.

      He says he closes hard and fast because:
      a) He has a full pipeline.
      b) He works hard on providing outstanding service.

      The good service is part of his close, saying in effect, "You get ME in the deal, which no one else can offer, so let's just do this." He is his own Unique Selling Proposition.
      Good point.

      Another thing to remember is that Grant Cardone is freakin' Grant Cardone!

      I know sure as well that I am not Grant Cardone and you probably are not either (whoever you are). That is just something to keep in mind.
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      • Profile picture of the author CLSVentures
        With just the limited sliver of the call that we are judging by....hard to know whether this one sticks or ends up netting zero revenue from a canceled sale or chargeback once the wife blows a gasket and the guy's emotions from the call settle.

        Back when I was in the insurance industry, we had a guy that closed life sales in a Cardone-like fashion.

        He won award after award and trip after trip. All the while having a completely ABYSMAL retention percentage and almost ALL of them fell off within the first year. Probably barely ended up in the black revenue-wise with the commish chargebacks etc.

        Few people that are closed the way Cardone did will stick. But like someone mentioned, in this particular instance and with this particular market maybe it is the type of close that is most effective. I'll freely admit that I'm not well-versed enough in this market to judge.

        However, I do know that if Cardone used that strategy and close attitude in a B2B environment to an executive.....well, I'd like to be a fly on the wall for a few of those calls. That would be good humor.

        But it may be exactly what it takes with car sales training.
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        • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
          Originally Posted by CLSVentures View Post

          Few people that are closed the way Cardone did will stick. But like someone mentioned, in this particular instance and with this particular market maybe it is the type of close that is most effective. I'll freely admit that I'm not well-versed enough in this market to judge.

          However, I do know that if Cardone used that strategy and close attitude in a B2B environment to an executive.....well, I'd like to be a fly on the wall for a few of those calls. That would be good humor.

          But it may be exactly what it takes with car sales training.
          Good point. There are a wide range of products, industries and situations in sales. One strategy will not necessarily apply to the other. Some say "sales is sales," but not always. I've seen people who lagged behind in selling to mom and pops shine when pitching to Madison Avenue agencies.

          I worked briefly in computer sales, and watched a woman's career boom once she left our national retail chain and went to Apple. (This was well before they were the behemoth they are today, but still, hey, Apple.)

          As a young buck, I did some hard-style closing with an account while on a tandem call with an older rep. He reported me to the sales manager that day for closing too hard and "being a jerk." Hey, we weren't getting the business anyway haha. But I could see later it didn't really fit for that client.

          So I left that company and got rich.

          And then lost it all.
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          • Profile picture of the author CLSVentures
            Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

            Good point. There are a wide range of products, industries and situations in sales. One strategy will not necessarily apply to the other. Some say "sales is sales," but not always. I've seen people who lagged behind in selling to mom and pops shine when pitching to Madison Avenue agencies.

            I worked briefly in computer sales, and watched a woman's career boom once she left our national retail chain and went to Apple. (This was well before they were the behemoth they are today.)

            As a young buck, I did some hard-style closing with an account while on a tandem call with an older rep. He reported me to the sales manager that day for closing too hard and "being a jerk." Hey, we weren't getting the business anyway haha. But I could see later it didn't really fit for that client.

            So I left that company and got rich.

            And then lost it all.
            There is a lot of story behind the last few sentences in your post. Would probably make for good convo over a beer. Lotta meat on that bone!
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by CLSVentures View Post

          With just the limited sliver of the call that we are judging by....hard to know whether this one sticks or ends up netting zero revenue from a canceled sale or chargeback once the wife blows a gasket and the guy's emotions from the call settle..
          That's why you need to settle the guy's emotions before he gets off the call. The "Post sale" is very important, and will keep these deals from exploding.

          Another way of looking at it, if 20% cancel, that's still lots of sales made, that wouldn't have been made otherwise.


          Originally Posted by CLSVentures View Post

          .
          Few people that are closed the way Cardone did will stick.
          .
          Sure they will. But you can't sell like Cardone, if you can't lock sales in after they are sold. It might take another ten or twenty minutes to settle the customer down, and cement the sale. You can keep 95% of these Hard sales from cancelling.


          Most of my sales, in homes, were barely made...stuck together with hope, anticipation, and guile. And nearly all stuck. It's what you do, after they say "Yes".
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    I want to hear from the wife.
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  • Profile picture of the author daniyal100
    Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

    Grant Cardone is using Twitter's Periscope better than anyone I've seen so far. Recently he took questions and someone asked what are his favorite closes.

    This is what he said -- by the way, to make these work, you have to present your price early in the discussion -- don't wait until the end:

    Have you seen enough to make a decision?

    Have you seen enough to make a decision on the investment required?

    On a scale of 1 to 10, where are we right now?

    If you were going to say yes, how would you make sense of this investment?

    The product is $60,000. When was the last time you invested $60,000?

    How would you justify investing $$60,000?

    He said you can learn more from these webinars at WhateverItTakes Network. These are paid products which I don't know anything about. This is not an affiliate link and I have no relationship with the company:

    10x Seminar
    7 Secrets to Selling
    Secrets to Closing the Sale

    On-Demand Webinars - #WhateverItTakes
    Thank you for sharing the non affiliated link joe. But why the f*** he's sharing his decades of real life learned knowledge to the world for that cheap?

    Is it a charity type of thing or he doing it for money?
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