Door to door issue. Need Advice

35 replies
I been doing door to door for about 3 months now. I feel like I lost the motivation to keep going


I sell smart meters and I feel like I'm be coming robotic in my approach. I split out the same lines again and again.


The next door I knock, I feel emotionless which pretty much shows on my face and at the doors. The lack or results don't help either.


Has anyone experienced this?


The problem is the company I work for don't care about you. They don't have much training and you are pretty much on your own and don't offer shadowing.


The other issue I find is no one seems to want smart meters but then again, that could be my limiting believe.


The first 3 months was great and in general and I have learnt a lot as I read books to increase my sales skills but now can not find the reason to keep doing this. Also to let everyone know, my sales skills have increased.


I know I can get good at selling if I persist.


If any one can help or offer advice; I would really appreciate it.
#advice #door #issue
  • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
    So, you are looking for motivation to stay in a soul-sucking job selling something few people want door-to-door?

    I would seriously reconsider your future. Why not find something you are actually passionate about and build a career around that?
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  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    Your not excited and you don't believe in your product. If you can't get excited about it and show it how can you expect your potential customer to take interest? You can get by selling just on technical know how if it's something they NEED but if it's not a nesesity then you have to build desire and you have to act excited and enthusiastic, high energy. Remember people don't buy logically, they buy emotionally then back it up with logic. If you don't believe in and have a passion for your product your going to burn out like you have already. There's a million other things to sell. Find something you really like in sales and peruse it. Just remeber sales can be the lowest paying easy work or the highest paying hard work. Let me know if you have any technical questions. However the problem is in your head not at the door.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      I had almost 40 years of highly successful selling...with almost total indifference to my product.

      I was acting, playing a role. The reps around me that were all excited about the product...never made much money. They thought that excitement made sales. And because of that, they saw no need to actually learn how to sell.

      Do heart surgeons have motivational meetings? Are they pumped up? No. In sales, this kind of enthusiasm is what is used to replace competence. Incompetent sales managers will try to generate over the top enthusiasm, because they can't teach the most profitable methods.

      To the OP...
      You are at the very beginning of learning how to sell. You don't need motivation. You need to understand that enthusiasm is unnecessary. What is necessary is the habit of working every day, and learning how to sell better. If you continue learning how to sell, you'll never be bored. You are bored because you have stopped being interested in learning.

      If you don't like your company, change.
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      • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
        I think you'll find my advice much more what your looking for. Do what works, do what's right. The salesGod has spoken.
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        • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
          Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

          I think you'll find my advice much more what your looking for. Do what works, do what's right. The salesGod has spoken.
          For those that are slow here and only been selling for many years, can you tell us on what basis or past experiences, what hook do you hang your god hat on.
          Signature
          | > Choosing to go off the grid for a while to focus on family, work and life in general. Have a great 2020 < |
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      • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
        Claude,

        I think that the "pumped up" crowd telegraphs something to the other
        party that they may not have intended - Neediness.

        Watch the sharks on Sharktank. Notice anyone jumping up and down and
        beating their chest with enthusiasm? It's dealtime and those folks get real serious
        when there's money on the table.

        I didn't see any Tony Robbins "rah! rah!" when watching your selling from
        the stage video. Just a well rehearsed presentation, delivered with the
        sole intent of creating sales of your products. The only motivation necessary.

        My .02
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Ron Lafuddy View Post

          Claude,

          I think that the "pumped up" crowd telegraphs something to the other
          party that they may not have intended - Neediness.

          Watch the sharks on Sharktank. Notice anyone jumping up and down and
          beating their chest with enthusiasm? It's dealtime and those folks get real serious
          when there's money on the table.

          I didn't see any Tony Robbins "rah! rah!" when watching your selling from
          the stage video. Just a well rehearsed presentation, delivered with the
          sole intent of creating sales of your products. The only motivation necessary.

          My .02
          The Rah Rah enthusiasm I see (and all salespeople see) is what is substituted for real sales training. The thought is, "If we can't train them, at least we can get them excited about selling".

          To be fair, if someone is selling a very simple product, and the offer itself isn't valued, the motivational meetings are needed. A motivated rep will sell more than an unmotivated rep.
          But this motivation is fleeting. In fact, it's needed every day, and dissipates almost instantly.

          If you are making 300 calls a day, setting appointments with a very short script....nearly every rep will need a boost, just to get them to work at all.

          Think of the last time you bought something from a great salesperson. Was he/she yelling? Were they jumping up and down? Telling rapid fire jokes? Being more enthusiastic than a mentally healthy human being would be?

          No.

          This over enthusiastic sales persona, is what non-salespeople...and new salespeople think selling is. This is how they picture salespeople. This is why salespeople in movies are depicted as fast talking, needy, lowlifes.

          But when you are talking about real money, things get serious. And selling isn't about enthusiasm, it's about clear communication.

          Yeah, I noticed the same thing on Sharktank. Exchanging money is a serious subject.
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          • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            The Rah Rah enthusiasm I see (and all salespeople see) is what is substituted for real sales training. The thought is, "If we can't train them, at least we can get them excited about selling".

            To be fair, if someone is selling a very simple product, and the offer itself isn't valued, the motivational meetings are needed. A motivated rep will sell more than an unmotivated rep.
            But this motivation is fleeting. In fact, it's needed every day, and dissipates almost instantly.

            If you are making 300 calls a day, setting appointments with a very short script....nearly every rep will need a boost, just to get them to work at all.

            Think of the last time you bought something from a great salesperson. Was he/she yelling? Were they jumping up and down? Telling rapid fire jokes? Being more enthusiastic than a mentally healthy human being would be?

            No.

            This over enthusiastic sales persona, is what non-salespeople...and new salespeople think selling is. This is how they picture salespeople. This is why salespeople in movies are depicted as fast talking, needy, lowlifes.

            But when you are talking about real money, things get serious. And selling isn't about enthusiasm, it's about clear communication.

            Yeah, I noticed the same thing on Sharktank. Exchanging money is a serious subject.
            No one mentioned yelling when talking and jumping up and down when selling that's a pretty exaggerated take on being excited about the product your selling. And it's commen sence that it won't work Other then that everything sounds pretty smart in "theory". I'm sure a newbie would believe it. By the way how many calls have you guys made today? This week? Month ? Year? We don't need to compare bank accounts do we? Haha jk
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

              No one mentioned yelling when talking and jumping up and down when selling that's a pretty exaggerated take on being excited about the product your selling. And it's commen sence that it won't work Other then that everything sounds pretty smart in "theory". I'm sure a newbie would believe it. By the way how many calls have you guys made today? This week? Month ? Year? We don't need to compare bank accounts do we? Haha jk

              In my career, I've made about 12,000 in home sales calls. Not calling for an appointment, I mean full sales presentations, in person. About two hours each. How many doors have I knocked on? My guess is 70,000. but that's just a guess.

              I have a tad over 7,200 sales over $1,000 each.

              Everything sounds smart in theory? A newbie would believe it?

              You just told me everything I needed to know about you.
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              • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
                Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                In my career, I've made about 12,000 in home sales calls. Not calling for an appointment, I mean full sales presentations, in person. About two hours each. How many doors have I knocked on? My guess is 70,000. but that's just a guess.

                I have a tad over 7,200 sales over $1,000 each.

                Everything sounds smart in theory? A newbie would believe it?

                You just told me everything I needed to know about you.
                7,200 sales out of the 70,000 doors knocked and 12,000 homes appointments and whatever else you did? That's about a 8% closing ratio. Far below average.With a closing ratio like that you should not be in a position to be training salespeople and giving advice. Also a real pro wouldn't be selling a $2.99 ebook. Have you ever herd the expression those who can't do, teach?

                To the new salespeople really trying to learn this just goes to show you that you'll come across a lot of "gurus" but sticking to the basic fundamentals is what pays off. Btw I don't sell any training I'm here to give good advice that works day In and day out. And the same advice i used to close at almost 50% in my phone sales career. Hope that puts it in perspective for you guys.
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                • Profile picture of the author DABK
                  It's 10.28%. It's based on a guess. And, more importantly, you
                  are not comparing apples to apples.

                  And even if 8% is a low ratio, he should be teaching those who do 7% or less, don't you think they'd benefit?

                  Really, get off your white steed, you knight in white salesman armor, you and talk like a normal person.

                  By the way, you with your 50% closing ratio shouldn't teach either, only I should. Because I close 98% of the time.

                  Yup, mine is bigger than yours.

                  PS I don't cold call a lot and I don't do any in-house presentations. But, if your closing ratio is close to 50%, mine is higher. Because that's how it is. And if yours goes up to 60%, mine will still be higher. Mine will always be higher... Yup, I'm that kind of man.

                  Back to serious and normal: Stop bashing people, show knowledge and/or proof and might take you seriously. In the meantime, though I'd love to learn to close more than I do now, I'm not going to take you seriously. And I suggest newbies do the same.



                  Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

                  7,200 sales out of the 70,000 doors knocked and 12,000 homes appointments and whatever else you did? That's about a 8% closing ratio. Far below average.With a closing ratio like that you should not be in a position to be training salespeople and giving advice. Also a real pro wouldn't be selling a $2.99 ebook. Have you ever herd the expression those who can't do, teach?

                  To the new salespeople really trying to learn this just goes to show you that you'll come across a lot of "gurus" but sticking to the basic fundamentals is what pays off. Btw I don't sell any training I'm here to give good advice that works day In and day out. And the same advice i used to close at almost 50% in my phone sales career. Hope that puts it in perspective for you guys.
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                • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                  Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

                  7,200 sales out of the 70,000 doors knocked and 12,000 homes appointments and whatever else you did? That's about a 8% closing ratio. Far below average.
                  Simple math isn't really your strong suite, is it? Your understanding of what "closing ratio" means, could use a little work, as well.


                  Originally Posted by DABK View Post

                  It's 10.28%. It's based on a guess. And, more importantly, you
                  are not comparing apples to apples.
                  Closing ratio is the number of sales closed VS the number of presentations made. So it's about 60% in my example. For me, it was about 50% on a cold call, and about 80% on a referral. My office average was 41%. A little above industry average.

                  The 70,000 is just a guess as to the total number of people I met. Most of them, I disqualified at the door. Trying to sell everyone you meet, is a very foolish waste of time. It's a beginner mistake. One I made my first year or so.

                  added later; To DABK; I just read this again, and it looks like I'm saying you don't know what you are talking about. My post wasn't really directed at you, but your post made me decide to answer. Sorry if I gave everyone the wrong idea.
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                  • Profile picture of the author DABK
                    S'okay. I wasn't calculating your closing ratios; just redoing his/her math correctly.

                    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                    Simple math isn't really your strong suite, is it? Your understanding of what "closing ratio" means, could use a little work, as well.




                    Closing ratio is the number of sales closed VS the number of presentations made. So it's about 60% in my example. For me, it was about 50% on a cold call, and about 80% on a referral. My office average was 41%. A little above industry average.

                    The 70,000 is just a guess as to the total number of people I met. Most of them, I disqualified at the door. Trying to sell everyone you meet, is a very foolish waste of time. It's a beginner mistake. One I made my first year or so.

                    added later; To DABK; I just read this again, and it looks like I'm saying you don't know what you are talking about. My post wasn't really directed at you, but your post made me decide to answer. Sorry if I gave everyone the wrong idea.
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                • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
                  Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

                  7,200 sales out of the 70,000 doors knocked and 12,000 homes appointments and whatever else you did? That's about a 8% closing ratio. Far below average.With a closing ratio like that you should not be in a position to be training salespeople and giving advice. Also a real pro wouldn't be selling a $2.99 ebook. Have you ever herd the expression those who can't do, teach?

                  To the new salespeople really trying to learn this just goes to show you that you'll come across a lot of "gurus" but sticking to the basic fundamentals is what pays off. Btw I don't sell any training I'm here to give good advice that works day In and day out. And the same advice i used to close at almost 50% in my phone sales career. Hope that puts it in perspective for you guys.
                  OK.

                  You've done it.

                  I'm officially adding you to my Ignore list.

                  You're laughable.


                  Guess who I miss? Adrian Browning. Ah the good old days, when we had legit trolls.
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                  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                    Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

                    OK.

                    You've done it.

                    I'm officially adding you to my Ignore list.

                    You're laughable.


                    Guess who I miss? Adrian Browning. Ah the good old days, when we had legit trolls.
                    Don't be mad at him, he just doesn't know, what he doesn't know.

                    For instance, in some post of his he said he was interested in better leads,
                    and today he pokes fun at Claude for the ebook .... being ignorant of the
                    fact he found what he was looking for.

                    @ salesgod ... I don't sell training or books or anything about sales.
                    In order to give you a little perspective, I have been selling for over 20 years
                    and have sold hundreds of millions in product.

                    And I'm telling you ... you should pay attention to what Claude says.

                    He isn't in your review mirror because he is behind you, it's because he has
                    lapped you a dozen times over and is about to do it again.
                    Signature

                    Selling Ain't for Sissies
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                  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                    Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

                    OK.

                    You've done it.

                    I'm officially adding you to my Ignore list.

                    You're laughable.


                    Guess who I miss? Adrian Browning. Ah the good old days, when we had legit trolls.
                    Adrian Browning. Now, that was a Troll worth his weight in gold.
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                  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
                    Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

                    OK.

                    You've done it.

                    I'm officially adding you to my Ignore list.

                    You're laughable.


                    Guess who I miss? Adrian Browning. Ah the good old days, when we had legit trolls.
                    when a prospect gives you an objection do you get angry and put them on your ignore list? letting emotions get the best of you wont take you very far in sales. mind explaining specifically witch portion of my post was laughable and for what reasons? also im not sure what a "troll" is i assume its internet talk would you mind bringing me up to date on what this means?
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                  • Profile picture of the author Advanpro
                    [DELETED]
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                • Profile picture of the author RogueSparky
                  Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

                  Also a real pro wouldn't be selling a $2.99 ebook.
                  Why not?


                  .....
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                  • Profile picture of the author DABK
                    Don't you know? Real pros know that numbers ending in 7 convert better! A real pro would be selling them at $2.97, that's why.

                    Originally Posted by RogueSparky View Post

                    Why not?


                    .....
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      • Profile picture of the author newbie_ken
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I had almost 40 years of highly successful selling...with almost total indifference to my product.

        I was acting, playing a role. The reps around me that were all excited about the product...never made much money. They thought that excitement made sales. And because of that, they saw no need to actually learn how to sell.

        Do heart surgeons have motivational meetings? Are they pumped up? No. In sales, this kind of enthusiasm is what is used to replace competence. Incompetent sales managers will try to generate over the top enthusiasm, because they can't teach the most profitable methods.

        To the OP...
        You are at the very beginning of learning how to sell. You don't need motivation. You need to understand that enthusiasm is unnecessary. What is necessary is the habit of working every day, and learning how to sell better. If you continue learning how to sell, you'll never be bored. You are bored because you have stopped being interested in learning.

        If you don't like your company, change.

        Quick question everyone, what does OP mean??



        Hi Claude,


        I really appreciate you advice. I think it's not the selling I don't like, it's more the smart meters I don't really like. At first I knew nothing about them and actually made more sales in the beginning. The more I found out about the product, The more I feel I couldn't sell them. I knew I wanted to do door to door and give it a shot. It was very exciting in the beginning.


        I think I need to study more selling like you said and find some thing I really love to sell. I'm not naturally good at selling but willing to knock on as many doors as I can to understand it.


        I'm just wondering as a business can we sell anything door to door? In terms of jobs out there, there just doesn't seem to be anything I like. I think in the UK/London there doesn't seem to be much out there on products and services that I like.


        All the advice on this forum has been helpful.
        Signature

        I'm a newbie Realtor based in the UK. My goal is to find buyers and sellers in UK. This is a commission only job.

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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by newbie_ken View Post

          Quick question everyone, what does OP mean??
          Original Poster.





          Originally Posted by newbie_ken View Post

          I really appreciate you advice. I think it's not the selling I don't like, it's more the smart meters I don't really like. At first I knew nothing about them and actually made more sales in the beginning. The more I found out about the product, The more I feel I couldn't sell them. I knew I wanted to do door to door and give it a shot. It was very exciting in the beginning.
          It's like that with every sales job. The more you know about a product, the less special it becomes.....the less unique. Even the company you work for, you begin to see problems. The company loses its luster. It's happened to me with every new product I've sold.

          Originally Posted by newbie_ken View Post

          I think I need to study more selling like you said and find some thing I really love to sell. I'm not naturally good at selling but willing to knock on as many doors as I can to understand it.
          In my entire life, I've only found one person that had natural talent. Nobody is good at selling, in the beginning. It's all an acquired skill.


          Originally Posted by newbie_ken View Post

          I'm just wondering as a business can we sell anything door to door? In terms of jobs out there, there just doesn't seem to be anything I like. I think in the UK/London there doesn't seem to be much out there on products and services that I like.


          All the advice on this forum has been helpful.
          My only advice in choosing a sales career, is, "Who do you want to talk to?"

          Do you like business people? Consumers? Pet owners? Retirees? Young people? Techies? Engineers? Teachers? Firemen? Parents? Wealthy people? Horse breeders?

          For me, the product isn't enough to keep me interested. All products become ordinary to you after awhile. But the people change. Who would you want to spend all day talking to?

          For me, I like talking to salespeople, and small business owners...and pretty much nobody else. So, my day is kept interesting (or at least tolerable) because I'm talking to the people I choose.

          But let's say that you really love new technology. You can talk about it for hours. That's where you should look.
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          • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            For me, I like talking to salespeople, and small business owners...and pretty much nobody else. So, my day is kept interesting (or at least tolerable) because I'm talking to the people I choose.
            Bit like this forum eh Claude?

            Sometimes it is like the first time you wash your clothes for the first time and you just don't know to separate the wash.

            The newbies end up absorbing some of the wash from the reds that should have been removed and then end up a bit pink.

            Hopefully they will realise who has actually walked the walk and talked the talk...you made any calls this week Claude?...apart from the one or two that mattered?
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          • Profile picture of the author newbie_ken
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Original Poster.







            It's like that with every sales job. The more you know about a product, the less special it becomes.....the less unique. Even the company you work for, you begin to see problems. The company loses its luster. It's happened to me with every new product I've sold.



            In my entire life, I've only found one person that had natural talent. Nobody is good at selling, in the beginning. It's all an acquired skill.




            My only advice in choosing a sales career, is, "Who do you want to talk to?"

            Do you like business people? Consumers? Pet owners? Retirees? Young people? Techies? Engineers? Teachers? Firemen? Parents? Wealthy people? Horse breeders?

            For me, the product isn't enough to keep me interested. All products become ordinary to you after awhile. But the people change. Who would you want to spend all day talking to?

            For me, I like talking to salespeople, and small business owners...and pretty much nobody else. So, my day is kept interesting (or at least tolerable) because I'm talking to the people I choose.

            But let's say that you really love new technology. You can talk about it for hours. That's where you should look.

            Thanks Claude!!! This has been extremely helpful. The people in smart meter's are not the people I want to talk too lol. I now know why I'm stagnating.


            You got to talk to people you either like or like what your selling. This makes so much sense as this will never become boring now. I can talk hours about some topics and certain people with the same mind set or values.


            I'm very glad created this discussion and this has lead me to a break through I believe. Other have tried to explain it but the way you explained it has been extremely helpful.


            Your advice has encouraged me to keep going!!!


            Thanks Claude : ) !!!


            And every one off course ; )
            Signature

            I'm a newbie Realtor based in the UK. My goal is to find buyers and sellers in UK. This is a commission only job.

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      • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I had almost 40 years of highly successful selling...with almost total indifference to my product.

        I was acting, playing a role. The reps around me that were all excited about the product...never made much money. They thought that excitement made sales. And because of that, they saw no need to actually learn how to sell.

        Do heart surgeons have motivational meetings? Are they pumped up? No. In sales, this kind of enthusiasm is what is used to replace competence. Incompetent sales managers will try to generate over the top enthusiasm, because they can't teach the most profitable methods.

        To the OP...
        You are at the very beginning of learning how to sell. You don't need motivation. You need to understand that enthusiasm is unnecessary. What is necessary is the habit of working every day, and learning how to sell better. If you continue learning how to sell, you'll never be bored. You are bored because you have stopped being interested in learning.

        If you don't like your company, change.
        OP,

        In your shoes, I'd click on Claude's name, pull up his past posts, and ignoring the humour that he brings to Off Topic, concentrate on posts relevant to sales. I have a background in sales myself in the UK - windows, doors, conservatories - and I've read enough posts from Claude to know he's forgotten more about offline sales than most of us will ever know.

        Also.

        You could always post your sales pitch in here and I bet, between all of us, we can offer refinements.

        Cheers,

        Tom
        Signature

        I Coach: Learn More | My Latest WF Thread: Dead Domains/ Passive Traffic

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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

          OP,

          In your shoes, I'd click on Claude's name, pull up his past posts, and ignoring the humour that he brings to Off Topic, concentrate on posts relevant to sales. I have a background in sales myself in the UK - windows, doors, conservatories - and I've read enough posts from Claude to know he's forgotten more about offline sales than most of us will ever know.

          Also.

          You could always post your sales pitch in here and I bet, between all of us, we can offer refinements.

          Cheers,

          Tom
          Tom; That was very kind of you. Thanks.

          There are several others here that are top level experienced salespeople.

          Misterme, Jason Kanigan, Ewen Vile, Ken Michaels, DaniMc, there are a few others.

          Read these guy's posts, and you won't go wrong. Some of the threads on closing, and answering objections...were highly educational. There are some real "AHA!" insights to be found here.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
    Claude, what you have described is how a true, experienced professional tackles a necessary task.

    You understood that you were selling something you had a great deal of confidence in... yourself. The product was irrelevant, it could have been anything.

    I am afraid our OP is not there. He has already given up on sales. Maybe he'll find it along the way, but right now I stand by the assessment that he is in the wrong place at the wrong time.
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  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    all great comments. you've all done the job of getting your feeling across to me in regards to how your felt about my last comment. Now the fact that i pointed out is simple. the closing ratio Claude posted was around 8-10% would anyone here agree that that's a closing ratio of a pro? theirs been alot of long replys that are ment to stir up an argument however the question is simple and requires a one word answer.

    Q- is a 8-10% closing ratio that of a pro?
    A- yes or no
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    • Profile picture of the author RogueSparky
      Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

      all great comments. you've all done the job of getting your feeling across to me in regards to how your felt about my last comment. Now the fact that i pointed out is simple. the closing ratio Claude posted was around 8-10% would anyone here agree that that's a closing ratio of a pro? theirs been alot of long replys that are ment to stir up an argument however the question is simple and requires a one word answer.

      Q- is a 8-10% closing ratio that of a pro?
      A- yes or no
      That's not the closing rate. To give an analogy, 1,000 people saw my website this month, 10 of them called me to come give them an estimate. Of those 10, I got 7 jobs. So my closing rate is 70%. It's not .07% like you are doing with Claude.

      This is simple stuff, something that any sales God should know.
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    • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
      Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

      Q- is a 8-10% closing ratio that of a pro?
      A- yes or no
      No it is not.

      You are miss-reading though.

      He knocked on 70,000 odd doors

      Got 12,000 presentations out of it.

      Sold 7200 of those 12,000 presentations.

      Selling vacuum cleaners of all things.

      So he sold 60% of all presentations.

      If you really want to do sold to knock ratio then it is approx 10%

      You dial 300 numbers a day. So it would be like you selling 30 of whatever you sell a day from those 300 dials which would include non answered calls just like some doors would not be answered.

      Make sense?

      Dan
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by jimbo13 View Post


        You dial 300 numbers a day. So it would be like you selling 30 of whatever you sell a day from those 300 dials which would include non answered calls just like some doors would not be answered.

        Make sense?

        Dan

        Thanks for the additional clarification.
        When I said 70,000 doors, I meant I actually talked to 70,000 people. It's an educated guess. I kept records for a couple of decades. I didn't keep records of the doors I knocked on, only the number of people I talked to. About 2/3 of the people I actually talked to didn't qualify, for one reason or another; bad credit, unemployed, one spouse not home, renting, or they just bought a new vacuum cleaner. I would find this out in the first few minutes.

        So, I wanted to talk to maybe 23,000 people. And about half of them were OK with that. This is actually the most impressive number. Getting half of your qualified prospects to agree to an in depth presentation (when they weren't expecting you at all, the minute before you arrived) is the key. That's actually the hardest part of the sale

        And then 60% of those people gave me lots of money. In the earlier years, my average was much lower, in the later years, much higher. These are career averages.



        Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

        all great comments. you've all done the job of getting your feeling across to me in regards to how your felt about my last comment. Now the fact that i pointed out is simple. the closing ratio Claude posted was around 8-10% would anyone here agree that that's a closing ratio of a pro? theirs been alot of long replys that are ment to stir up an argument however the question is simple and requires a one word answer.

        Q- is a 8-10% closing ratio that of a pro?
        A- yes or no
        I'll give it one more shot. Closing ratio means how many sales are made out of the number of presentations. That's in every sales book ever written. Every sales trainer defines closing ratio that way. This definition is so basic to selling, that I haven't even included it in any of my books. It simply never occurred to me that anyone in sales wouldn't know this.

        It isn't how many sales are made out of everyone you meet.

        Here;

        http://smallbusiness.chron.com/defin...tio-24985.html

        "Closing Ratio Defined
        Your closing ratio is the number of deals you close compared to the number of presentations you make. Say, for instance, you made 10 presentations last month and closed two sales as a result. You closed 2/10ths, or 20 percent, of your potential sales. Your closing ratio, then, is 20 percent."


        Or....just Google Closing Ratio and read any listing at all. I'm having a hard time believing you're serious.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
    I wonder how many less-experienced members understand the implications of a 41% closer. From mostly cold calls. Put it this way: if Claude had offered to take you on the door for a month, given you his pitch, let you in on the thousands of tiny things he did on top of the pitch, and, in effect, taken you under his wing, your life would have changed. You have no idea. I knew double-glazing canvassers, we had dozens across various teams, who would earn over £2,500 a week. which speaks nothing of the extra money if they happened to also be team managers. And we're going back some years now. But that was different. That was getting a home-owner to agree to a presentation - or a demonstration as we called it. Claude will have earned more on the doors. Probably a great deal more - and he wasn't closing demonstrations, in other words getting people to agree for salesmen to turn up the next day, this guy was cold selling. I don't wish to boost Claude's ego, or sound like a groupy, but SalesGod, and anyone else who feels like criticizing, you really need to learn a thing or two. Or ten. We're talking real money here and real experience. When I was back in offline sales, I could have done with a forum like WF, posts from chaps like Claude and Jason. I used to train, manage, do a great deal, and kick a great deal of ass, but I reckon I could have done it a lot better with the resources in evidence here.

    - Tom
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

      I wonder how many less-experienced members understand the implications of a 41% closer. From mostly cold calls. Put it this way: if Claude had offered to take you on the door for a month, given you his pitch, let you in on the thousands of tiny things he did on top of the pitch, and, in effect, taken you under his wing, your life would have changed. You have no idea. I knew double-glazing canvassers, we had dozens across various teams, who would earn over £2,500 a week. which speaks nothing of the extra money if they happened to also be team managers. And we're going back some years now. But that was different. That was getting a home-owner to agree to a presentation - or a demonstration as we called it. Claude will have earned more on the doors. Probably a great deal more - and he wasn't closing demonstrations, in other words getting people to agree for salesmen to turn up the next day, this guy was cold selling. I don't wish to boost Claude's ego, or sound like a groupy, but SalesGod, and anyone else who feels like criticizing, you really need to learn a thing or two. Or ten. We're talking real money here and real experience. When I was back in offline sales, I could have done with a forum like WF, posts from chaps like Claude and Jason. I used to train, manage, do a great deal, and kick a great deal of ass, but I reckon I could have done it a lot better with the resources in evidence here.

      - Tom
      Tom; First, thank you so much.

      The 41% was the office average. It included my sales, and the sales of my reps. My average on cold calls was 50%. (over my career). My last few years was all referrals, and selling past customers. I only cold called when I was teaching. A good rep would close about 33%. Most of their sales were from cold calls. Getting reps to get referrals was like pulling teeth.

      Sometimes, I would take the guys out in my car, and knock them into a presentation. It was hugely profitable, (because I came back to close the sales too), but it was really hard on the reps and myself. A lot of wasted time, where they were waiting for me in the car.

      The most I ever learned was from going with experienced reps in other industries (or other vacuum cleaner companies) and seeing what they did. Then they would go with me for a day. We learned quite a lot from each other.

      If the rep showed that he/she had aptitude, I would let them go with me for a week or two. Then I would go with them for a day or so. It was about the best training they could get. And by them going with me, it forced me to work....even when I didn't feel like it.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Tom; First, thank you so much.
        No need, at all. You bring back some great memories.

        I started out on the door while in university (needed the extra) and gravitated to the office, working across door, telephone canvassing, and sales. The time on the doors was the hardest, though, and yet the time that I remember most fondly. Does it ever toughen you up. Could tell you some stories; bet you could, too, since you did it a lot longer. I think if you can drive up to a street on a cold December morning, just you and that street, hundreds of potential doors to knock, never knowing who lives on the other side of each door, or what dangerous animals are in residence, you can do almost anything. When you start out in the career, those doors, especially in December, look cold and forbidding. But - once you break through the learning barrier - later on those doors stand for one thing and one thing only: opportunity. I can still remember almost falling over myself to knock some doors!

        I'm sat here today in a nice warm office with a coffee in easy reach and a moment ago my wife brought in sugar-glazed doughnuts. Would I go back to the doors? Part of me would love to. "The Kill." I miss it. But I know the moment I stepped out of the car and saw those houses I'd want my office back. Just haven't written or thought about it in the longest time, which is why I've been happy to read Offline more than chip in with advice, like I might do in the main forum.

        Still.

        Knocking. Gets me excited just to think about it.

        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        The 41% was the office average. It included my sales, and the sales of my reps. My average on cold calls was 50%. (over my career). My last few years was all referrals, and selling past customers. I only cold called when I was teaching. A good rep would close about 33%. Most of their sales were from cold calls. Getting reps to get referrals was like pulling teeth.

        Sometimes, I would take the guys out in my car, and knock them into a presentation. It was hugely profitable, (because I came back to close the sales too), but it was really hard on the reps and myself. A lot of wasted time, where they were waiting for me in the car.

        The most I ever learned was from going with experienced reps in other industries (or other vacuum cleaner companies) and seeing what they did. Then they would go with me for a day. We learned quite a lot from each other.

        If the rep showed that he/she had aptitude, I would let them go with me for a week or two. Then I would go with them for a day or so. It was about the best training they could get. And by them going with me, it forced me to work....even when I didn't feel like it.
        We had similar averages in double-glazing, but I can think of only one chap who "might" have had an average even close to that, over his career. Which highlights exactly what I was saying above. As a young chap I remember admiring his accomplishments. I'd come from money myself, but never really earned much of it at that point. I remember looking at that chap and wanting what he had. That guy had it all. The car. The house. The watch. The cash.

        Anyway! I'm going to check out your books when I have more time next week, buddy. I reckon I'll learn a lot (that I can apply to everything) and bring up some good memories in the bargain!

        Cheers - Tom
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

          I think if you can drive up to a street on a cold December morning, just you and that street, hundreds of potential doors to knock, never knowing who lives on the other side of each door, or what dangerous animals are in residence, you can do almost anything. When you start out in the career, those doors, especially in December, look cold and forbidding.
          We knocked on doors in the evening, as it was easier to get both of the couple at home. In the dead of winter, we started at about 6 PM, and went for an hour. To me, I loved canvasing in the winter. All the homes looked warm and inviting to me. In my entire life, I think I was told to leave three or four times. I was always amazed at how nice people were. My mindset was, "There are twenty homes on this street. I know that six of them will let me in, for a presentation...and four will buy from me. I just need to find that four." That awareness took the sting out of knocking on doors.


          Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

          "The Kill." I miss it. But I know the moment I stepped out of the car and saw those houses I'd want my office back. I doubt I have it anymore, which is why I've been happy to read Offline more than chip in with advice, like I might do in the main forum.
          I remember that "Killer instinct". I think every good salesperson has it, at least the top people. Ken Michaels also talks about this on the forum. I think that instinct drained out of me about five years ago. I could still teach someone how to cold call...but I wouldn't really enjoy it anymore.



          Originally Posted by Tom Addams View Post

          As a young chap, I remember looking at that chap, and while I came from money myself, I'd never really earned much of it at that point. I remember looking at that chap and wanting what he had. More, if I could. That guy had it all.

          I'm going to check out your books when I have more time next week, buddy. I reckon I'll learn a lot (that I can apply to everything) and bring up some good memories in the bargain!

          Cheers - Tom
          I remember watching other reps sell, and being so impressed. Going with an experienced salesperson, and watching a sale unfold. It was like watching a great magician. It was fascinating to me.

          I've been very lucky in that I have met phenomenal salespeople..and some truly great men.

          I can only remember a few times that I found both qualities in the same person.


          If I were going to find a mentor here....

          If I sold over the phone, I'd latch on to Ken Michaels...maybe work for him. His understanding of phone selling is profound.

          And I'm convinced that Misteme actually knows more about face to face selling than I do, he just isn't as boisterous as I am.

          His book on answering sales objections is outstanding. Here's an Amazon link.... (non affiliate)

          http://www.amazon.com/When-They-That-This-Photogra...http://www.amazon.com/When-They-That-This-Photogra...
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          • Profile picture of the author Tom Addams
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            We knocked on doors in the evening, as it was easier to get both of the couple at home. In the dead of winter, we started at about 6 PM, and went for an hour. To me, I loved canvasing in the winter. All the homes looked warm and inviting to me. In my entire life, I think I was told to leave three or four times. I was always amazed at how nice people were. My mindset was, "There are twenty homes on this street. I know that six of them will let me in, for a presentation...and four will buy from me. I just need to find that four." That awareness took the sting out of knocking on doors.
            Exactly! (Great tips for newbies.) That's exactly how I felt. When I was learning the ropes, we'd knock from late morning to early evening. Many of the leads were booked in the day. We'd then return in the evening, speak to both parties, and cement the lead which would be called up the next day to arrange the presentation. But, yes. It was the knowledge, the absolute surety, that all I had to do was knock. I wanted a single lead back when I started. I would book tons, but it was the lead that lead to a demonstration that I wanted. Some days, got it right away. Others, took me all day. Then as I got better, brought about by some on the door mentoring more closely resembling army training, the time got shorter, shorter, until I was finished in an hour or so. Arrive on prop. 10 to 20 doors knocked. 6 leads (that demonstrated) booked. Much of the success was down to the "knowing I'll get them" mindset.

            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            I remember that "Killer instinct". I think every good salesperson has it, at least the top people. Ken Michaels also talks about this on the forum. I think that instinct drained out of me about five years ago. I could still teach someone how to cold call...but I wouldn't really enjoy it anymore.
            Same here. Exactly. But, as you can probably tell, the "pull" to do it again is strong. I won't. I know that. But - goodness - I'm clenching my teeth when I think of the kill. And now I'm grinning. Good times, they were.

            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            I remember watching other reps sell, and being so impressed. Going with an experienced salesperson, and watching a sale unfold. It was like watching a great magician. It was fascinating to me.

            I've been very lucky in that I have met phenomenal salespeople..and some truly great men.

            I can only remember a few times that I found both qualities in the same person.


            If I were going to find a mentor here....

            If I sold over the phone, I'd latch on to Ken Michaels...maybe work for him. His understanding of phone selling is profound.

            And I'm convinced that Misteme actually knows more about face to face selling than I do, he just isn't as boisterous as I am.

            His book on answering sales objections is outstanding. Here's an Amazon link.... (non affiliate)

            http://www.amazon.com/When-They-That...ing+objections
            That's exactly what it was like for me. A little different, getting leads not sales, but yes, exactly. And I still remember the feeling of being that way, too. You stand there, door opens, new face, usually a "not interested" forming on the lips, and minutes later you've got them out and you're pointing at their windows and walking around the back of the house and then going inside and up and down the stairs with them. They didn't know what hit them.

            I say if you and I ever meet up, sod it, we hammer some doors!

            Cheers for the links, Claude. I'm off to go look!

            - Tom
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