When a Prospect says "We'll call you later" and doesn't

32 replies
I'd like to hear from sales pro's about this. Tried researching but didn't quite find it.

Technically I'm using this to get an actual job, but the concept seems the same.

What do you do when a prospect says "We'll call you next week" and they don't. Then you followup and they say "we'll call you later today" and they don't.

What's the response to this? What do you think, if any, is the underlying objective?
#prospect #well call you later
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    it means they aren't interested, and don't have the nerve to tell you.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10320591].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    Originally Posted by theinfomaven View Post

    I'd like to hear from sales pro's about this. Tried researching but didn't quite find it.

    Technically I'm using this to get an actual job, but the concept seems the same.

    What do you do when a prospect says "We'll call you next week" and they don't. Then you followup and they say "we'll call you later today" and they don't.

    What's the response to this? What do you think, if any, is the underlying objective?
    They don't want or need your service an have a personal problem with just telling you to go away.

    If you present yourself well and are desirable from a prospective employer's position then they may have to work out a few things but once you follow up and get a rejection then that is it.

    There is no likely hope in that situation.

    You can always follow-up later and sometimes people admire persistence but usually if you were or what you were selling was needed then the decision would be made on the first or second approach.

    I recently...like 18 months ago...had a foreign student approach me for work.

    I had no position available...but...

    they presented well...

    ...they were studying their Masters of Accountancy at a well known University local to my business.

    They had walked the street from where they were staying and had only been in the country for 6 days when they came in my door.

    I did the usual "I have nothing but please leave me your resume thing"

    They presented well and immediately sold me on their skills. They had retail experience...could use a variety of accountancy software...they spoke several languages...they explained they were looking for a secure position whilst they studied...etc..

    They called me back later that day.

    I offered a trial starting the next day.

    They still work for me part time and full time when they are not studying.

    They wouldn't have worked for me if they couldn't have painted the picture of how they fitted into my business.

    If you paint that picture and the decision maker can visualise the outcome then there usually isn't too much delay between you painting and them buying.

    Doubt....then there is perhaps not much chance.

    Work on eliminating that doubt from the first words that you use to engage your next prospect.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10320615].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
      "Thanks, we'll get back with you next week with an answer."

      <reply>
      "Is there any reason why you cannot give me that answer right now? If there's something I'm perfectly capable of addressing anything if I've missed something."

      Or before they even have a chance to give you that response you can try to address it before it even comes up:

      "So have you heard enough to make a decision right now?"

      Or get a specific name who will be calling as well as the day and time rather than "next week".

      "Next week? Ok sure. Who will be calling me? What day and time will <person> be calling? One last thing.... is there any reason why <person name> would not be able to make that call?"

      It sounds like you are simply getting pushed around a bit. Perhaps if you change your own framing and how you are percieved, you will get a different response.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10320665].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Ron C Farrow
        Originally Posted by jamesfreddyc View Post

        "Thanks, we'll get back with you next week with an answer."

        <reply>
        "Is there any reason why you cannot give me that answer right now? If there's something I'm perfectly capable of addressing anything if I've missed something."

        Or before they even have a chance to give you that response you can try to address it before it even comes up:

        "So have you heard enough to make a decision right now?"

        Or get a specific name who will be calling as well as the day and time rather than "next week".

        "Next week? Ok sure. Who will be calling me? What day and time will <person> be calling? One last thing.... is there any reason why <person name> would not be able to make that call?"

        It sounds like you are simply getting pushed around a bit. Perhaps if you change your own framing and how you are percieved, you will get a different response.
        Too pushy for a B to B sales call in the UK. Better to always leave the door open for further dialogue, either face to face or on the phone.
        If you've overcome objections be prepared to take a step back to telling the benefits, perhaps with more compelling evidence.
        If you put a prospect on the spot be prepared to have the door slammed in your face. Better to play the long game.
        Signature

        Making it with Online Arbitrage

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10357435].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          I think the key here is deal flow.

          If you have no deals in your pipe line, you'll massage and encourage any deal that has a spark of life. And that isn't a fun way to live. I've been there.

          When you already have a couple of deals that are just paid, it frees you up to talk more like a business man, and less like a guy that needs business.

          I've said on several occasions, "I'd like you to tell me if we are going ahead with this. "No" is a perfectly acceptable answer".

          Of course, that triggers a "No" in most (but not all) cases. But you know what? That wasn't a deal anyway. It was a fantasy deal.

          I have only said this when I thought they were just not willing to say "No".. Some people find it incredibly hard to tell anyone "No", so they avoid it at all costs.

          This is different from having someone in a funnel, where you keep e-mailing them automatically, until they either buy or get off your list. I'm talking about someone who can't say "NO"....but they can't say "Yes" either.someone who has all the information they need, and just can't say "No".

          I would much rather get a "No" that be dragged along with a 10% chance that they will eventually buy.

          Just a personal preference.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10357547].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            I think the key here is deal flow.

            If you have no deals in your pipe line, you'll massage and encourage any deal that has a spark of life. And that isn't a fun way to live. I've been there.

            When you already have a couple of deals that are just paid, it frees you up to talk more like a business man, and less like a guy that needs business.

            I've said on several occasions, "I'd like you to tell me if we are going ahead with this. "No" is a perfectly acceptable answer".

            Of course, that triggers a "No" in most (but not all) cases. But you know what? That wasn't a deal anyway. It was a fantasy deal.

            I have only said this when I thought they were just not willing to say "No".. Some people find it incredibly hard to tell anyone "No", so they avoid it at all costs.

            This is different from having someone in a funnel, where you keep e-mailing them automatically, until they either buy or get off your list. I'm talking about someone who can't say "NO"....but they can't say "Yes" either.someone who has all the information they need, and just can't say "No".

            I would much rather get a "No" that be dragged along with a 10% chance that they will eventually buy.

            Just a personal preference.
            Doesn't this depend on a few factors such as sales cycle, profit margin, and lifetime customer value?

            We call, email, text, hammer and contact until they buy or die - our sales cycle is 6-12 months, with a 12x ROI, and average $7,500 profit per deal.

            Yes - we have to keep after them. But, for every 100 prospects 2-4 will close. The importance of well-paid sales people are paramount to this equation.

            Could we just take the easy ones? Sure - but that would cut our revenue by 75%.

            IMHO - this is totally situation and product dependent.
            Signature
            Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10357707].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by DaniMc View Post

              Doesn't this depend on a few factors such as sales cycle, profit margin, and lifetime customer value?

              We call, email, text, hammer and contact until they buy or die - our sales cycle is 6-12 months, with a 12x ROI, and average $7,500 profit per deal.

              Yes - we have to keep after them. But, for every 100 prospects 2-4 will close. The importance of well-paid sales people are paramount to this equation.

              Could we just take the easy ones? Sure - but that would cut our revenue by 75%.

              IMHO - this is totally situation and product dependent.
              Absolutely. I only sell to the sole proprietor of a small business, or a single individual. I'm in a different business than you are.

              I play to my individual strengths, and sell accordingly. You're doing it the better way.

              You're a rancher. You tend the cattle, feed them, keep them warm, and breed them. Eventually you butcher them. You have a herd. Your herd grows.

              I'm a cattle rustler.

              (My friend Julius Toth explained it to me that way)
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10357735].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
          Originally Posted by Ron C Farrow View Post

          Too pushy for a B to B sales call in the UK. Better to always leave the door open for further dialogue, either face to face or on the phone.
          If you've overcome objections be prepared to take a step back to telling the benefits, perhaps with more compelling evidence.
          If you put a prospect on the spot be prepared to have the door slammed in your face. Better to play the long game.
          I just despise squishy responses. I'm busy and need definitive answers, completely uninterested in hearing "no's" disguised as something else.

          I usually soften things in my delivery (its difficult to fully describe a conversation in a forum posting). For example, asking if there's any reason why they couldn't make an appointment is actually getting them for just a smidgen of commitment. If that's too pushy then they are likely too squishy for me to even work with. However i will deliver that in a softened way that is a lighthearted anday even get a chuckle.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10357749].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author quadagon
    The only thing I would add is if they say something like that try and pin them down to a time and date.

    Something along the lines of

    'Great when we're you thinking of'

    'Do you have your diary and we can arrange an appointment?'

    This will weed out some of the not interesteds but not all.

    If you do get a time and date follow up with an email or letter if you can. Include the time and date and the fact that they decided on it. If you've read influence you'll see we are trying to invoke consistency.

    For the vast majority of the time Claude's right.
    Signature
    I've got 99 problems but a niche ain't one
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10320645].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AmericanMuscleTA
    You need to read Claude's Sales Prospecting book. He answers that question.

    He tells it like it is.
    Signature

    David Hunter | Duke of Marketing | Real Estate Agent
    www.DukeOfMarketing.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10320753].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Yeah, it's a no. You did not convince them at all.

    I've heard of people getting a job this way when they study the company they want to
    work for and present a pretty detailed plan that tells the "what, why, and how" about how
    they will improve the business, increase revenues ...

    One young man I read about was hired as a Vice President.

    Dan
    Signature

    "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10321380].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    If qualified and they'll actually benefit from what your offering theres 2 reasons people dont buy.

    1- they don't trust you
    2- they don't understand

    or it may be both.

    Build rapport and trust throughout your presentation. Its really hard to back peddle and try to build trust again. they usually make that decision pretty quick. that means your left with they "dont understand" and know ones gonna tell you there stupid and didnt understand so there gonna say theyll call you back instead. Ask questions, find out what portion of your opportunity they still have concerns about, address there concerns and close.

    very rarely will you just get a lay down and they say yes the first time you ask them to buy. circle close until you wear them out and they say yes. everyone knows callbacks are BS
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10321433].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
    The secret to sales is to retain your control. What you're currently experiencing is the Karpman Drama Triangle which means you're "playing" a game with them. When you break out of the cycle of back and fourth, that's when they take you seriously. What you need to do is CALL THEM OUT.

    As others have said, you ask questions which demand an answer which helps you determines whether you're coming or going.

    I'm not a fan of asking a better time to call back or when they should expect my call etc.The reason is because you're just asking time stall delaying question. Yes you can attempt to close them on a future appointment but it still doesn't reveal they're real concerns.

    Clients push you around because you let them. It's not their fault, its your fault because you let them control your time. They can play their positions as a client but you need to play your position as a salesperson and you MUST be better, knowing when to move on, when to close, when to pin down and get real answers.

    I'm waffling on a bit but I had this one prospect which I was calling straight for nearly a month, every other day. He would always say "I'll call you back", Call you at 5pm etc. I couldn't qualify him in or out because he would never talk. Enough was enough. That day I said:

    "Quick question Barry... why haven't you told me to piss off already?"

    He laughed and now took me serious and we spoke like adults. I qualified him OUT.

    You need to get prospects to level with you. Don't let them control you so you could say next time:

    "We have delayed our conversation many times now. Level with me, do you still want my product/service? and what is YOUR MAIN concern"

    I always get them to reveal the problem when I say "what is YOUR MAIN concern".

    Study sales so you can handle all situations.

    Good luck.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10322136].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
      Originally Posted by Michael Nguyen View Post

      "Quick question Barry... why haven't you told me to piss off already?"
      I guess because I didn't know you wanted me to...

      Piss off, Michael.

      Signature
      Brain Drained...Signature Coming Soon!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10325142].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    When someone says they will call you later - they almost never do. Even if they are interested and a perfect fit - life gets in the way and that little scrap of paper they wrote your info on got lost somewhere. Not to mention they forgot about you 5 minutes after the talk.

    "I'll call you later" just means you need to make a note to call them back. That is all it means.

    "I'll call you later" means "Call me later"

    I have closed some great deals on the 15th phone call. If they really don't want it - they will let you know.

    I have had many, many (did I say many?) people thank me for the aggressive follow up. People are busy and they procrastinate. At least once a week someone says "Thank you for staying in touch."

    Don't be lassiez faire about this. Take full responsibility for the sales cycle.
    Signature
    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10325187].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by DaniMc View Post


      Don't be lassiez faire about this. Take full responsibility for the sales cycle.
      Well ...color me lazy ...
      If you don't buy from me the first time I talk to you... then that's that.

      AND I know it's my fault.
      Signature

      Selling Ain't for Sissies
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10325269].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

        Well ...color me lazy ...
        If you don't buy from me the first time I talk to you... then that's that.

        AND I know it's my fault.
        I'm not a Boss like you are.

        But - I guarantee I can outsell 96.3% of sales persons just by never giving up.

        I'm not the most talented guy technically speaking. So I overcome that hurdle with volume and persistence.

        I know I could get so much better than I am - but I am too busy counting.
        Signature
        Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10325289].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

        Well ...color me lazy ...
        If you don't buy from me the first time I talk to you... then that's that.

        AND I know it's my fault.

        Same here. I never make a call back. It's not a matter of pride or ego. I just know what the returns are.

        But, now that I've said that. I know that it's a personal preference. For the majority of salespeople, repeated calls generate sales. And it's more profitable to call a list of people that have said "No" to you, than a cold list.

        But if I market to them before the sales call, qualify thoroughly, establish my position as a trusted adviser, and build seamless rapport......in other words, my very best effort....and they still have to think about it? I failed them.

        The vast majority of trained salespeople will do far better by courting the prospect. In fact, I would do better myself. But I'm not a courter...I'm a seducer. Seducing takes one call.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10325294].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
    Something that's worked like magic for me is setting deadlines

    Deadlines add a sense of urgency, and create momentum to get the deal done NOW.
    You have to convey that sense of urgency in your presentation.

    It's not necessarily a price deadline, could be a particular package or a model, a rebate that is not available after .... You get the picture.

    If it's your business, you get to create the deadline.

    A consistent use of deadlines will allow you to close more business - sooner -
    than just about anything else.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10325315].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    With jobs, it's pretty much a "Don't call us again."
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10325646].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dave147
    It depends on how much you really need the job or sale or client...if you're desperate, keep in touch until you get a definite NO...and even when you do get a no, take it as a not right now. Persistence can pay off...I have gotten many clients that have said they admired my "persistence" and became great clients.
    When you're starting out and your business is not established you sometimes have to become what some might consider as a "nuisance"
    Signature

    How to Create Your Own Wealth and Success
    $500.00 in FREE Advertising For You Here

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10326017].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by dave147 View Post

      It depends on how much you really need the job or sale or client...if you're desperate, keep in touch until you get a definite NO...and even when you do get a no, take it as a not right now. Persistence can pay off...I have gotten many clients that have said they admired my "persistence" and became great clients.
      When you're starting out and your business is not established you sometimes have to become what some might consider as a "nuisance"

      Along the same lines. I get people every week, handing me a resume. What I don't get, is someone showing up every few days, showing me that they are serious about wanting a job.

      The last guy that showed up twice, got the job. Just a thought.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10326296].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        Along the same lines. I get people every week, handing me a resume. What I don't get, is someone showing up every few days, showing me that they are serious about wanting a job.

        The last guy that showed up twice, got the job. Just a thought.
        If I really wanted to work for someone - I would just start. For instance - selling your vacuums. If someone wanted to work for you, and just started bringing clients in to your store (friends, family, neighbors, whoever), showing them your products, and getting you involved - I guarantee you'd hire them on the spot.

        I have someone doing this with me right now. She really wants to work with me - so, she is emailing asking me questions for people she knows. She is helping out another person who introduced her to me - all for free. Just assisting and helping add revenue.

        Of course - I am going to bring her on. I'd be stupid not to!
        Signature
        Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10326349].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by DaniMc View Post

          If I really wanted to work for someone - I would just start. For instance - selling your vacuums. If someone wanted to work for you, and just started bringing clients in to your store (friends, family, neighbors, whoever), showing them your products, and getting you involved - I guarantee you'd hire them on the spot.

          I have someone doing this with me right now. She really wants to work with me - so, she is emailing asking me questions for people she knows. She is helping out another person who introduced her to me - all for free. Just assisting and helping add revenue.

          Of course - I am going to bring her on. I'd be stupid not to!
          Phenomenal advice. Now, I feel obligated to share this story.

          About 30 years ago, I decided that I wanted to open a retail store selling vacuum cleaners.

          So, I decided to learn everything I could about running a store, and selling retail.

          I went to about 5 retailers in my area, and asked them if I could work for them, just to learn the business.

          They all were nice guys. But they all gave me one piece of advice, "Whatever you do, don't go see Julius Toth in Barberton Ohio. He advertises everywhere, steals our customers, and is unethical. "

          Of course, I had to meet this guy.

          In a run down part of town, he was taking in a million dollars a year (remember this was in the mid 1980s) selling high end vacuums. His small store had 5 full time salespeople (in less than 2,000 square feet of space) and they were busy.

          Of course, Julius was a phenomenal retail salesman, great family guy, funny..and we bonded almost instantly.

          He thought I was looking for a job. He told me he had no openings, and that his floor salesmen would rebel, if he hired a sixth guy.

          Here was my pitch (from memory).

          No. I don't want a job. I want to learn how to run a profitable retail store. Every one of your competitors hates you, And I can see why. You're doing everything they aren't able to do. And I know this, you're the guy I want to learn from. Pay me whatever you want, or nothing...I'm here to learn from you. At the end of six months, I'll open my own store, and be out of your hair. How can we make this work?"

          He sat there for a few minutes, staring at me. I knew I was in.

          He said, "OK, But there are rules. I'll pay you no salary, but you need to learn how to buy product. I'll give you all of my wholesale price lists. You make sales, and I'll give you a third of the profit. The rules are, you cannot take anyone coming in off the street. You cannot take any of the rep's Turns. And if you sell something that was in an ad, you get nothing. Break a rule, you're out. Lie to me, you're out. Cause problems, you're out.
          At the end of 6 months, you open a store at least 25 miles from me. Those are the terms"


          Done.

          How I worked around his rules, is another story. But I wasn't an employee, I was his student, his protege. And he and I both had extensive in home sales experience, so we understood each other. Of course, we became fast friends. Even to this day.

          In my life, I've told four men that I love them. My Dad, My Son, A dear friend that was a mentor to me for all my adult life...and Julius Toth.


          And I say this in some speeches;

          Want to get hired? Every day, I get someone handing me a resume. Looking for a job. Looking for what I can do for them. They put no effort into it. They give me no reason to want to work with them. And I don't need any more employees.

          But if someone came in my store and said, "Claude I want to learn this business. I want to learn it from you. Pay me whatever you want. I just want to learn how to do, what you do. I want to help you build your business. How can we do this?"

          I would hire that person. 100% certain. Because that person has drive, ambition, and positioned it as what he could do for me. And I would pay them well. That person would be unique. And I would do everything in my power, to help that person succeed.




          Want to get hired? That's how you get hired.

          By the way, Dan.....on my wall, above my computer is,
          "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle."

          Thanks again for that.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10326434].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DaniMc
    It's too bad all this stuff is just here in this forum. If the people here had a way to get these messages out to the people who need to hear it, everything could change.

    It just goes to show - nobody has any excuse for not having what we want. My life isn't how I want it to be quite yet - and it's all my fault. My head isn't right in those areas. But I am getting there.

    I don't believe anyone is every truly at zero - even if they think they are. Even when I got food from a charity 15 years ago after my first real business failed - I thought I was at zero.

    I was terminally hopeless and felt like a loser - but I was wrong.

    It's funny - how that one decision years ago caused millions of dollars to flow through your hands.

    You simply said "I am GOING to do this" - and you damn well did it!
    Signature
    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10326858].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
      Originally Posted by DaniMc View Post

      It's too bad all this stuff is just here in this forum. If the people here had a way to get these messages out to the people who need to hear it, everything could change.

      It just goes to show - nobody has any excuse for not having what we want. My life isn't how I want it to be quite yet - and it's all my fault. My head isn't right in those areas. But I am getting there.

      I don't believe anyone is every truly at zero - even if they think they are. Even when I got food from a charity 15 years ago after my first real business failed - I thought I was at zero.

      I was terminally hopeless and felt like a loser - but I was wrong.

      It's funny - how that one decision years ago caused millions of dollars to flow through your hands.

      You simply said "I am GOING to do this" - and you damn well did it!
      I know someone who owned a very popular bar. He had been a bartender before that and the place just took off on him, so maybe he was not ready to be a business owner. Anyway, he lost everything after being one of the first bar owners to get sued under the newer drunk driving legislation - a patron
      caused a fatal accident.

      I met him some 10 to 15 years after he lost the bar. He was waiting tables at some crap place.
      I doubt he ever recovered from feeling like he went from a Prince to a zero.
      Signature

      "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10326904].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by bizgrower View Post

        I met him some 10 to 15 years after he lost the bar. He was waiting tables at some crap place.
        I doubt he ever recovered from feeling like he went from a Prince to a zero.
        It's so unnecessary.

        If someone has a successful business, and they lose it, they have such an incredible head start in making their next fortune. They already know where to buy supplies, how to hire help, how to manage. How to promote.

        My friend Julius Toth (talked about in a previous post here) got a divorce maybe 20 years ago. He lost his home, his business, everything. He went bankrupt. He was devastated.

        I talked to him about it. Where others saw a lost cause, he saw opportunity. The bank took is building, in the bankruptcy. He offered to buy it for 20% of what he owed. They said OK, and even financed it. He called suppliers and offered to pay them in full, if they would still sell him product (they lost money in the bankruptcy). Within 3 years, he was wealthy again. Why? Because people that are used to being wealthy, already know how wealth is built. And they aren't comfortable being poor. So they keep at it until they are where they are comfortable.

        Yes, I offered to loan him money. And I knew he would turn it down, and he did. He knew it would be a crutch. Not having money is such a temporary thing. He knew (as I know) that getting money is really pretty easy. You just have to do the things that bring in money.
        Slowly at first, then you gain momentum.

        And he was only down for a few months. Wallowing in self pity isn't his style. And building wealth for the second time, is much much easier.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10326937].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          It's so unnecessary.

          If someone has a successful business, and they lose it, they have such an incredible head start in making their next fortune. They already know where to buy supplies, how to hire help, how to manage. How to promote.

          My friend Julius Toth (talked about in a previous post here) got a divorce maybe 20 years ago. He lost his home, his business, everything. He went bankrupt. He was devastated.

          I talked to him about it. Where others saw a lost cause, he saw opportunity. The bank took is building, in the bankruptcy. He offered to buy it for 20% of what he owed. They said OK, and even financed it. He called suppliers and offered to pay them in full, if they would still sell him product (they lost money in the bankruptcy). Within 3 years, he was wealthy again. Why? Because people that are used to being wealthy, already know how wealth is built. And they aren't comfortable being poor. So they keep at it until they are where they are comfortable.

          Yes, I offered to loan him money. And I knew he would turn it down, and he did. He knew it would be a crutch. Not having money is such a temporary thing. He knew (as I know) that getting money is really pretty easy. You just have to do the things that bring in money.
          Slowly at first, then you gain momentum.

          And he was only down for a few months. Wallowing in self pity isn't his style. And building wealth for the second time, is much much easier.
          Now I wish I knew what happened to the guy I wrote about. My feeling is/was that
          he was a bartender who got lucky, not a man who simply gets up after being knocked down.

          Interesting aside: Ewen posted just posted an advertisement written by Julius Toth.
          http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...l#post10326610
          Signature

          "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10327121].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jimmcdonald909
    Leave them. Never chase a client. Have it the other way around.
    Signature

    Huge profits in lower priced, micro cap, momentum stocks
    www.investmentswithadifference.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10346884].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author nojobsleftbehind
    Wasting your time. Never let a prospect run you around in circles.
    Signature

    “Make $100 a day from your computer.”
    instantrewardsnetwork.com/nxnjr2014

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10348254].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    they are telling you:

    1. they might be flat out busy, you should be calling them anyway
    2. you haven't tuned your target market, wasting your time on poor prospects
    3. you haven't quite generated enough interest in your pitch.
    Signature

    In a moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing. The worst thing you can do is nothing. ~ Theodore Roosevelt

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10356770].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author 0xFF
    Very frequent and it surprises/hurts me everytime... As Claude Whiteacre said : they "don't have the nerve" to tell you they are not interested. Me, when someone acts like this with me, I blacklist him/her without delay. I'm a little bit wild and the diplomatie is not for me; I far prefer the persons who are directs and franks (ie. as rare as valuable) even when they are not interested! We all gain time and energy...
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10357761].message }}

Trending Topics