12 replies
does anyone have any experience getting leads from home advisor? do you know how they charge?
#advisor #home #leads
  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    http://www.homeadvisor.com/rfs/servi...adSchedule.pdf

    http://www.homeadvisor.com/rfs/docs/hs_salestools.pdf

    Originally Posted by StudentOfTheGame View Post

    does anyone have any experience getting leads from home advisor? do you know how they charge?
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  • Profile picture of the author StudentOfTheGame
    Is there anyway to charge someone's account automatically every time I send a lead to them? For instance the can say they have a budget of and don't want to spend more then $500 a week on leads, can I automatically charge there account in anyway and not go over there budget of course? Or would it be better to get them on a subscription and for example if each lead is $50 they pay $200 for the week, say I send them 3 leads and then credit the remaining $50 back to them. Is that a viable model?
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by StudentOfTheGame View Post

      Is there anyway to charge someone's account automatically every time I send a lead to them? For instance the can say they have a budget of and don't want to spend more then $500 a week on leads, can I automatically charge there account in anyway and not go over there budget of course? Or would it be better to get them on a subscription and for example if each lead is $50 they pay $200 for the week, say I send them 3 leads and then credit the remaining $50 back to them. Is that a viable model?

      Why not just charge $500 for ten leads, as they come in. Then charge their card every time you start over. They stipulate a maximum number of leads per month.

      You can use lots of different processors, or Paypal.
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  • Profile picture of the author BillyParadise
    Assuming you aren't ServiceMagic, then it's probably easier to work off a flat fee model. 5+ leads / week on average = X. 10+ leads / week on average = XX. etc etc rinse repeat.

    Or someone could custom code something for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author raulto
    I've tried them when i started my office cleaning business, half they leads they gave me were sh*t. And they kept charging me for nothing so i had to call me credit card ppl to block them.
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    • Profile picture of the author shockwave
      Originally Posted by raulto View Post

      I've tried them when i started my office cleaning business, half they leads they gave me were sh*t. And they kept charging me for nothing
      Can you more clearly define the following....

      1. "leads they gave me were sh*t"
      2. "And they kept charging me for nothing"
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  • Profile picture of the author BillyParadise
    I think it has to do with managing expectations. Some leads will be $#+! There should be enough in the budget so that when only x leads out of 10 convert, the profit covers the ones that didn't.
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    • Profile picture of the author shockwave
      I think it has to do with managing expectations. Some leads will be $#+! There should be enough in the budget so that when only x leads out of 10 convert, the profit covers the ones that didn't.
      It doesn't matter what the niche is. In 16 years all leads I have driven have been "shit" unless I charged more and worked directly with the client on building systems and providing training in the back end to increase conversions. Then magically all my leads were gold ;-)
      Yeah, that was my point of trying to get clarification from the OP.

      I actually used to work for HomeAdvisor back when it was ServiceMagic (and have posted about leadgen many times here in the forum). I agree with BillyParadise - it's about expectations. I find that even today, if you are selling leads, you better set realistic expectations on what a lead is vs. what it isn't.

      As Peter Lessard said, For the most part, the difference between shitty leads vs. good ones isn't the lead, it's the sales process the client has in place.
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
    It doesn't matter what the niche is. In 16 years all leads I have driven have been "shit" unless I charged more and worked directly with the client on building systems and providing training in the back end to increase conversions. Then magically all my leads were gold ;-)
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    • Profile picture of the author eccj
      Originally Posted by Peter Lessard View Post

      It doesn't matter what the niche is. In 16 years all leads I have driven have been "shit" unless I charged more and worked directly with the client on building systems and providing training in the back end to increase conversions. Then magically all my leads were gold ;-)
      Yeah that seems to be universal.

      I think I have fallen for buying leads three different times thinking that "this time is different."

      Unless you want to build your business around your lead source it just isn't worth it. Even if the leads are good it interrupts what you are already doing.

      To be fair though, there are some plain awful leads out there.....
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