To anyone who has/is selling in homes

by kevd10
12 replies
Hi.

I currently sell kitchens in homes for a company in the UK. I started around 3 months ago and have done pretty well (around 80k worth of business generated for the company). My issue is I find it very hard to deal with spells of poor performance. I sometimes go 2 weeks without selling and I slip into a little bubble of negativity.

I also have an issue with selling to certain kinds of people. For example, people who may be a little rough around the edges, lower class kind of people really make me go into my shell.

The leads come from canvassing and cold calling and the lead is then confirmed before I turn up.

Any help would be much appreciated!
#has or is #homes #selling
  • Profile picture of the author MeLeads
    This is something every business owner goes through, especially when first starting out. Once you become more established, have increased marketing, and get more word of mouth referrals these dry-spells will subside. It's important to stay positive through the low points and push through.
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    • Profile picture of the author unglued
      If your issues with the varying demographics you sell to are ever to be resolved, it'll probably be with time, effort and experience. Amateurs sell, experts sort, and masters find a way to connect-IF there's even a fit to begin with. I'm still learning this by degrees every day.

      Regarding your sales dry spells, maybe you need a change of perspective. Consider this:

      Not everyone who starts a new sales job can legitimately boast 80 grand in sales their first 90 days. I'd bet most would have a different and significantly sadder story to tell were they in your shoes, myself included, depending on how interested I was (or wasn't...) in what I was selling. :-/

      Further, you said that you sometimes go two weeks without making a sale, at least implying that this has happened more than once. For someone to generate that much revenue within that short tenure AND with presumably more than one two week dry spell during said tenure is even more impressive.

      While there's almost always room to improve, try not to be so hard on yourself. The reasons above are more than enough cause to celebrate. Besides, when it comes to selling, there are at least a handful of titans among us here still. Tremendous guys and gals who've posted (and do regularly) absolute gold. With your post count, you probably know many of them already.

      You're in good hands here. Keep posting, stay hungry and open-minded. I think you're on the right track more than you know. Good luck.

      unglued
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post


        I also have an issue with selling to certain kinds of people. For example, people who may be a little rough around the edges, lower class kind of people really make me go into my shell.
        I know what you need to do, but I don't know how you're going to accomplish it.
        It might be a time thing, or it might have to do with how many calls you go on.
        It might also have to do with how much money you make.

        What you need to do is learn to not give a shit. Seriously, you need to NOT care.

        Way easier said then done and it takes lots of practice to perfect.

        When you figure it out... your sales will go through the roof.
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        • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
          Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

          I know what you need to do, but I don't know how you're going to accomplish it.
          It might be a time thing, or it might have to do with how many calls you go on.
          It might also have to do with how much money you make.

          What you need to do is learn to not give a shit. Seriously, you need to NOT care.

          Way easier said then done and it takes lots of practice to perfect.

          When you figure it out... your sales will go through the roof.
          This is the truth.

          This is also why I say, "Qualify first, sell later." Don't get emotionally involved until after the prospect is qualified.

          I hope you are meeting only when all the decision makers are at home--meaning if there's a husband and wife, you don't go until both are there.

          One of the top kitchen renovators in Vancouver would go into the kitchen with the wife, and say, "Oh, there's nothing wrong here, these counters and cabinets are fine; what's wrong with this?" The wife would immediately jump on the lengthy list of everything she hated about the kitchen, and the deal was pretty much done at that point.

          When somebody calls me, I don't care at first.

          They could be a price shopper, or a total flake with nothing going on.

          Only after they've qualified In do I get excited about the idea of working with them.

          Just because someone wants to meet with you doesn't mean they're ready to buy or even want to buy. Maybe they just want free information.

          Learn to value yourself and what you bring to the table. When you do, you won't care what the other person does, and you'll want to protect that value. Then your confidence will remain high.
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  • Profile picture of the author TrafficFlow
    I agree. You are being too hard on yourself.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

    I also have an issue with selling to certain kinds of people. For example, people who may be a little rough around the edges, lower class kind of people really make me go into my shell.
    Here's a reality. When you are selling in people's homes, the easiest people to get to see, are the people that are "rough around the edges". They are also the easiest people to sell.

    You have to stop thinking about the customer, and what they are like. Think about them as a set of qualities; are they qualified? Are they working? Have they bought from an in home salesperson before? Are the husband and wife both there?

    You've been doing this for three months. You are virtually brand new at this. Stop judging the customers as people, and think of them as customers.

    Honest to God, I don't remember 99% of the people I've sold in their home. To me, it's just a performance. I'm acting. They are the audience.

    I can promise you this, you don't know how to sell yet. Invest a few dollars on Amazon, with a few classic books on selling.


    You have some true experts on selling on the Offline Forum. You have questions? Ask away.
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Here's a reality. When you are selling in people's homes, the easiest people to get to see, are the people that are "rough around the edges". They are also the easiest people to sell.

      You have to stop thinking about the customer, and what they are like. Think about them as a set of qualities; are they qualified? Are they working? Have they bought from an in home salesperson before? Are the husband and wife both there?

      You've been doing this for three months. You are virtually brand new at this. Stop judging the customers as people, and think of them as customers.

      Honest to God, I don't remember 99% of the people I've sold in their home. To me, it's just a performance. I'm acting. They are the audience.

      I can promise you this, you don't know how to sell yet. Invest a few dollars on Amazon, with a few classic books on selling.


      You have some true experts on selling on the Offline Forum. You have questions? Ask away.
      When he says "low class" that shows me he is at the emotional stage
      of the game (learning to sell ).

      OP when you are busy being emotional, then you are stuck in the minute.
      You need to be 5-10 or more steps ahead of the conversation in your head.
      Not possible if your too busy being emotional.

      The reasons is pretty simple ... if your too busy being emotional ... then you're not thinking!

      If you show no emotions you will come off like a robot - not good!

      The trick is only "show" emotions that will further the conversation towards
      your goal. So yes.... acting.

      Also, I suggest you take some time and study mirroring.
      It's a great tool you can use while you learn how to keep your feelings in check.

      Edit:
      Upon refection, I think you should be made aware that ... I have never met a single
      person who learned sales in a perfect upwards arc.

      What I have seen for years ... and went through myself,
      is the one step forward and two steps backwards method.

      You have to fail, you have to mess up sales, you have to flub the close and rebuttals
      ... you have to lose control of conversations. You have to go through periods
      of no sales.

      It is the only way to learn the lessons that you need to stick with you for life.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

        When he says "low class" that shows me he is at the emotional stage
        of the game (learning to sell ).

        OP when you are busy being emotional, then you are stuck in the minute.
        You need to be 5-10 or more steps ahead of the conversation in your head.
        Not possible if your too busy being emotional.

        The reasons is pretty simple ... if your too busy being emotional ... then you're not thinking!

        If you show no emotions you will come off like a robot - not good!

        The trick is only "show" emotions that will further the conversation towards
        your goal. So yes.... acting.

        Also, I suggest you take some time and study mirroring.
        It's a great tool you can use while you learn how to keep your feelings in check.

        Edit:
        Upon refection, I think you should be made aware that ... I have never met a single
        person who learned sales in a perfect upwards arc.

        What I have seen for years ... and went through myself,
        is the one step forward and two steps backwards method.

        You have to fail, you have to mess up sales, you have to flub the close and rebuttals
        ... you have to lose control of conversations. You have to go through periods
        of no sales.

        It is the only way to learn the lessons that you need to stick with you for life.
        Yup.

        My selling success came in sudden bursts, and then plateaus that might last a few years...then another upwards burst, and another plateau.

        But when I was 20 years old, my first sales job was selling fire alarms. I went a full six months without a single sale. My parents were so proud.....

        The big bursts in production came when I did some of the following (always only one at a time. I was a very slow study);

        I stopped caring if they said "No".
        I stopped pitching to one spouse without the other.
        I started keeping notes of every presentation I did. What worked, what didn't, married, single, age bracket, what objection, how I closed it, why I think I missed it...etc.
        I realized that lower income people (that still worked ) were easier to see, and would buy more readily that day.
        I started asking for referrals on a set program (huge increase in income)
        I started going with other salespeople (in different businesses) to see what they did.
        I started seeing people that already bought from another in home salesperson. (More than doubled my sales. Maybe biggest increase)
        I started seeing the customers of other salesmen.
        I realized that I could go back every 5-6 years to my customers...and sell them again...almost effortlessly.
        I started telling them the total price as soon as possible, and then built value.

        There's more. But each of these realizations gave me a great bump in sales...and it would stay there until the next Aha moment.

        To the OP; The fact that you are making sales at all is impressive. But study what you do. Sales is a study.

        And keep track of when you are actually working. I've never seen a sales slump where the rep was actually working. They start doing "busy work", that feels like work. They hang out in bars more, sit with other reps drinking coffee......not really working.

        Anyway, you have a few Masters Of The Game here. Good stuff.

        Added later; Yeah, what Michaels said. Stop thinking about the customers and judging them as people. It will drive you mad. Because people are crazier than they appear in public. And when you are in their home, all that odd ball stuff just comes out. Smile, fake interest, carry on. Take a shower, cash your check.
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  • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
    Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

    I also have an issue with selling to certain kinds of people. For example, people who may be a little rough around the edges, lower class kind of people really make me go into my shell.
    If you go to Church, to sporting events, or other public places, take the time to introduce yourself, shake hands, and give a business card to people who are "a little rough around the edges".

    Getting a little more exposure outside of your sales presentations will help you become blind to their roughness during your sales presentations.

    Keep in mind, Sam Walton continued to drive around in a pickup truck looking a little rough around the edges, even after he was a multi-billionaire. You never know what kind of goldmine is hidden just below that rough exterior.
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    • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
      I am not joking but this book is excellent. It is a very short book and is highly relevant to what you are doing.

      One Call Closing: The Ultimate Guide To Closing...One Call Closing: The Ultimate Guide To Closing...

      If acted upon in conjunction with any training you are provided with; your attitude, your sales ratios and your bank balance will move in a favourable direction.

      If, hand on heart, you say you cannot buy it then I will buy it for you. Just PM me your address.

      Dan
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      • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
        Originally Posted by jimbo13 View Post

        I am not joking but this book is excellent.
        Ditto. I bought it a few months ago and it is excellent.
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    Something about this thread reminded me of a post I made ... its somewhat on topic.

    Original post here: http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ml#post9287881


    Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

    The thing about sales is ... just about every sales person is on a different part
    of the learning curve. That in and of itself makes it very difficult to learn, teach and share.
    It also makes it darn near impossible for some people to see things differently.

    One thing I see often with reps is the one step forward, two steps backwards when
    it comes to perfecting the craft.

    Sometimes the smallest deviation from what they already know ... what they
    already use ... what they already know to work in there limited field of view

    ... will put them in a tail spin of non sales. So they are aggressive in the fact
    there way is the right way, there way is the only way.

    In my opinion, learning sales is done in steps - like climbing a mountain,
    sometimes you have to go down or side ways before you can go up.

    Sometime you have to get stuck for a while and find it in your heart
    to man up and keep going ... and like a mountain, if you try to do to
    much to soon ... without the proper real life experience ... you die.

    as far as being to insistent and closing all the time or inappropriately ...

    They are just on a different section of the mountain.

    The people that are closer to the top know that you don't have to close
    any more. You don't have to bang them over the head with rebuttals.
    You don't have to "find the perfect angle"

    The prospects do it all themselves.

    We are just Sherpa's clearing the path.
    I'm out for the night - Getting my 6 year old ready for Halloween
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