Built From WF: Consultative Cold Call Script (Jason Kanigan, Claude Whitacre, Ken Michaels, etc.)

30 replies
Hey guys.

I don't know when it happened, but recently it occurred to me that the people who really know what they are doing are in the offline section.

Anyway...

I've been a telemarketer and outside salesman a handful of times in my life, but I've never sold anything for myself for my own company. And I haven't touched the phone in over two years.

I see a lot of people asking about the phone, too...

So I thought I'd contribute.

Quick backstory: When I was in the credit repair industry, that was my first phone gig. And I was awful. So what I did was record the owner pitching customers, and I turned his pitch into a script.

I quickly made pretty good sales.

But it wasn't consultative.

And I got burned out.

So...

I took the recommendation of Claude Whitacre (and others) to follow around a certain Warrior, Jason Kanigan, and piece together his consultative cold calling methods.

This is what I came up with.

This is pretty generic, but I I think it's laser-targeted to business owners. I know that's a contradiction. Of course, I have a purpose in mind for it, after I get past freaking about picking up the phone again.

Plus, I'm working on what to sell. I have basic ideas. Nothing solid.

Maybe customer reactivation postcards and letters.

(BTW: If anyone has a gig, let me know).

Maybe you guys will find it useful.

It's pretty much 95% Jason Kanigan, unless otherwise noted. Some Ken Michaels, some Claude Whitacre by default, Mwind076, Dave Kurlan.

Also, a little Bryan Franklin (who I don't think is a member) on price rebuttals and qualifying for the decision maker. Not sure that last part is necessary when talking to business owners...

I just thought it was genius.

My biggest things of course is the qualifying stage. You can't really put that into a script. But I've learned from these guys it's the most important if you want to close sales.

If they don't have the need, budget, authority, or personality fit...

Ciao.

Anyway, hope this helps...

It took me about two days to put together.



Cold Call Prospecting Script

GETTING PAST THE GATEKEEPER (DON'T HAVE OWNER'S NAME)
Hi. Um, I'm not really sure who I should speak to. Maybe you can help me. I'm looking for the person who's in charge of keeping customers coming back into the store and making extra sales to them after they've already bought from you guys. I know you got people who handle customers when they're there, but is there someone who's in charge of that?
GETTING PAST THE GATEKEEPER TWO (HAVE OWNER'S NAME)
Hey, this is Marc. Is _____ still in? I'll hold.
(Attitude: I'm supposed to be calling, I'm in a hurry, and I'm a little put off that I even have to make this call.) (Ken Michaels)
REBUTTAL TO BEING ASKED WHY YOU'RE CALLING IF YOU SOUND UNCONFIDENT
"If he's not available, when should I call him back? This is Marc." (Mwind076) (Fix: sound confident)
OPENING FOR DM
Hi, is this a bad time? (Jason Kanigan + Claude Whitacre adoption)
"Yes, it's a bad time."
Okay. I'll call you later. (Hang up.)
"No, it's a good time."
"What's it about?"
"Who's calling?"
I appreciate that. Let me take a quick thirty seconds, I'll tell you why I called, and then you can decide whether we should keep talking or not. Is that fair?
"Okay."
"Who are you?"
"What's it about?"

YOUR 30 SECOND COMMERCIAL: WHO YOU ARE & WHY YOU CALLED
I appreciate that. My name is Marc and I help [business owners] like you who are frustrated that they're losing their best customers, causing them to miss out on a lot of money and monthly revenue if they could just find an effective way to bring them back into the fold. (Pause) Can I ask you a question?
(Jason Kanigan + some Dave Kurlan)
Okay. I work with an awful lot of [business owners] and lately the two biggest frustrations they're having about keeping their customers coming back is an increasingly declining response to all of their follow up marketing, and of course, not enough new business in the pipeline to make up for it. But I don't know if you're experiencing any of these issues...
"Nah, everything is fine."

I HAVE A TON OF BUSINESS/EVERYTHING IS FINE REBUTTAL
I appreciate that. Can I ask you one question before I go? (Yes.) When I first spoke with many of the people who eventually became my clients, they told me exactly what you just did: that everything was going great. But after they gave me the chance to speak with them for a little while, they opened up and shared with me that things were not nearly as rosy as they said. So I asked them: why did you tell me at first that business was going great? And they told me, Marc, I just didn't know you. That's not happening here, is it?
QUALIFY THEM OUT FOR NEED/BUDGET/FIT (GENERIC QUESTIONS) (JASON + CLAUDE)

So you've established that they're interested and they're experiencing Symptom XYZ or Problem 123.
• Alright so tell me more about that. Can you explain that some more?
• Why do you think that's happening?
• And how long has this been going on?
• What do you think the cost has been?
• Have you done anything to try and fix it?
• What happened then?
• How much are you currently spending on it?
• And where are you at now?
• Sounds like a problem. Do you want to fix it? Do you want my help? (Dave Kurlan
QUALIFY THEM OUT FOR DECISION MAKER (BRYAN FRANKLIN)
Great. So assuming we work together and assuming you're the decision maker, is there anyone else you need to check with before making a commitment (to solve this problem/to the kind of work we might do)?
REBUTTALS TO GET THEM BACK INTO ANSWERING YOUR QUESTIONS IF THEY'RE PERSISTENT PITAS

"How much does this cost?"
I'm glad you're asking that because it means you're serious about getting your problem solved, but I'm just curious, what is the problem that you're trying to solve?
I understand but before I can answer that I need to know if you have a need for a solution. So I have no idea, because I don't know what we're doing yet.
If you don't have a need for a solution, obviously it doesn't cost anything.
"How long will this take?"
Oh, well I have no idea because I don't know what we're doing yet. But I was more curious about the decision maker and whether you're empowered to make this decision? So is there anyone else we're going to need to check with once we do decide how long this is going to take?
"What's the price?"
Tell me about your budget approval.
"I just want to know how much it costs."
Okay. Let's say it was under $5,000, so if what we come up with is under $5,000, would you be able to sign for it? Are you the decision maker, or is there someone else we need to check with.
"Yeah, I have to check with my wife."
Great. When can schedule a call between you and your wife and I, because your wife is going to have concerns that you may not think of. And I want to make sure that your wife is as much an advocate as I am for your success in the work that we're going to do together.
And that's it. That's all I got so far.

I need to work on monetizing the problem next. It's on the list.

And as all you pro's already know...

All of this would come before a demo or presentation.

What do you think?

PS. This is important. There are a lot of things I won't do, like web design, or lead generation, advertising, etc. at this stage. I just want to sell reactivation campaigns.

PM if I can refer you business for your services.

Also PM me if you need a salesman.

I need to get my feet wet again.

Thanks!
#call #claude #cold #consultative #exclusive #forum #jason #kanigan #ken #michaels #script #warrior #whitacre
  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    Originally Posted by Marc Rodill View Post

    Hey guys.

    I don't know when it happened, but recently it occurred to me that the people who really know what they are doing are in the offline section.

    Anyway...

    I've been a telemarketer and outside salesman a handful of times in my life, but I've never sold anything for myself for my own company. And I haven't touched the phone in over two years.

    I see a lot of people asking about the phone, too...

    So I thought I'd contribute.

    Quick backstory: When I was in the credit repair industry, that was my first phone gig. And I was awful. So what I did was record the owner pitching customers, and I turned his pitch into a script.

    I quickly made pretty good sales.

    But it wasn't consultative.

    And I got burned out.

    So...

    I took the recommendation of Claude Whitacre (and others) to follow around a certain Warrior, Jason Kanigan, and piece together his consultative cold calling methods.

    This is what I came up with.

    This is pretty generic, but I I think it's laser-targeted to business owners. I know that's a contradiction. Of course, I have a purpose in mind for it, after I get past freaking about picking up the phone again.

    Plus, I'm working on what to sell. I have basic ideas. Nothing solid.

    Maybe customer reactivation postcards and letters.

    (BTW: If anyone has a gig, let me know).

    Maybe you guys will find it useful.

    It's pretty much 95% Jason Kanigan, unless otherwise noted. Some Ken Michaels, some Claude Whitacre by default, Mwind076, Dave Kurlan.

    Also, a little Bryan Franklin (who I don't think is a member) on price rebuttals and qualifying for the decision maker. Not sure that last part is necessary when talking to business owners...

    I just thought it was genius.

    My biggest things of course is the qualifying stage. You can't really put that into a script. But I've learned from these guys it's the most important if you want to close sales.

    If they don't have the need, budget, authority, or personality fit...

    Ciao.

    Anyway, hope this helps...

    It took me about two days to put together.



    Cold Call Prospecting Script

    GETTING PAST THE GATEKEEPER (DON'T HAVE OWNER'S NAME)
    Hi. Um, I'm not really sure who I should speak to. Maybe you can help me. I'm looking for the person who's in charge of keeping customers coming back into the store and making extra sales to them after they've already bought from you guys. I know you got people who handle customers when they're there, but is there someone who's in charge of that?
    GETTING PAST THE GATEKEEPER TWO (HAVE OWNER'S NAME)
    Hey, this is Marc. Is _____ still in? I'll hold.
    (Attitude: I'm supposed to be calling, I’m in a hurry, and I'm a little put off that I even have to make this call.) (Ken Michaels)
    REBUTTAL TO BEING ASKED WHY YOU'RE CALLING IF YOU SOUND UNCONFIDENT
    "If he's not available, when should I call him back? This is Marc." (Mwind076) (Fix: sound confident)
    OPENING FOR DM
    Hi, is this a bad time? (Jason Kanigan + Claude Whitacre adoption)
    "Yes, it's a bad time."
    Okay. I'll call you later. (Hang up.)
    "No, it's a good time."
    "What's it about?"
    "Who's calling?"
    I appreciate that. Let me take a quick thirty seconds, I'll tell you why I called, and then you can decide whether we should keep talking or not. Is that fair?
    "Okay."
    "Who are you?"
    "What's it about?"

    YOUR 30 SECOND COMMERCIAL: WHO YOU ARE & WHY YOU CALLED
    I appreciate that. My name is Marc and I help [business owners] like you who are frustrated that they're losing their best customers, causing them to miss out on a lot of money and monthly revenue if they could just find an effective way to bring them back into the fold. (Pause) Can I ask you a question?
    (Jason Kanigan + some Dave Kurlan)
    Okay. I work with an awful lot of [business owners] and lately the two biggest frustrations they're having about keeping their customers coming back is an increasingly declining response to all of their follow up marketing, and of course, not enough new business in the pipeline to make up for it. But I don't know if you're experiencing any of these issues...
    "Nah, everything is fine."

    I HAVE A TON OF BUSINESS/EVERYTHING IS FINE REBUTTAL
    I appreciate that. Can I ask you one question before I go? (Yes.) When I first spoke with many of the people who eventually became my clients, they told me exactly what you just did: that everything was going great. But after they gave me the chance to speak with them for a little while, they opened up and shared with me that things were not nearly as rosy as they said. So I asked them: why did you tell me at first that business was going great? And they told me, Marc, I just didn't know you. That's not happening here, is it?
    QUALIFY THEM OUT FOR NEED/BUDGET/FIT (GENERIC QUESTIONS) (JASON + CLAUDE)

    So you've established that they're interested and they're experiencing Symptom XYZ or Problem 123.
    • Alright so tell me more about that. Can you explain that some more?
    • Why do you think that's happening?
    • And how long has this been going on?
    • What do you think the cost has been?
    • Have you done anything to try and fix it?
    • What happened then?
    • How much are you currently spending on it?
    • And where are you at now?
    • Sounds like a problem. Do you want to fix it? Do you want my help? (Dave Kurlan
    QUALIFY THEM OUT FOR DECISION MAKER (BRYAN FRANKLIN)
    Great. So assuming we work together and assuming you're the decision maker, is there anyone else you need to check with before making a commitment (to solve this problem/to the kind of work we might do)?
    REBUTTALS TO GET THEM BACK INTO ANSWERING YOUR QUESTIONS IF THEY'RE PERSISTENT PITAS

    "How much does this cost?"
    I'm glad you're asking that because it means you're serious about getting your problem solved, but I'm just curious, what is the problem that you're trying to solve?
    I understand but before I can answer that I need to know if you have a need for a solution. So I have no idea, because I don't know what we're doing yet.
    If you don't have a need for a solution, obviously it doesn't cost anything.
    "How long will this take?"
    Oh, well I have no idea because I don't know what we're doing yet. But I was more curious about the decision maker and whether you're empowered to make this decision? So is there anyone else we're going to need to check with once we do decide how long this is going to take?
    "What's the price?"
    Tell me about your budget approval.
    "I just want to know how much it costs."
    Okay. Let's say it was under $5,000, so if what we come up with is under $5,000, would you be able to sign for it? Are you the decision maker, or is there someone else we need to check with.
    "Yeah, I have to check with my wife."
    Great. When can schedule a call between you and your wife and I, because your wife is going to have concerns that you may not think of. And I want to make sure that your wife is as much an advocate as I am for your success in the work that we're going to do together.
    And that's it. That's all I got so far.

    I need to work on monetizing the problem next. It's on the list.

    And as all you pro's already know...

    All of this would come before a demo or presentation.

    What do you think?

    PS. This is important. There are a lot of things I won't do, like web design, or lead generation, advertising, etc. at this stage. I just want to sell reactivation campaigns.

    PM if I can refer you business for your services.

    Also PM me if you need a salesman.

    I need to get my feet wet again.

    Thanks!

    This is pretty horrible. "consultive sales" is total BS. The concept was invented by people who are afraid to be aggressive and close. You ask way to many yes or no questions in this pitch. If you used this in real life you'd get hung up on almost every time. If it is working AT ALL your probably losing 70% of the deals you could be closing. YES OR NO QUESTIONS ARE DEADLY. remember your a telemarketer, a solicitor, an annoying salesman, if you give them the chance to stay on the phone and be "sold" by you by asking yes or no questions, they'll always say no so they can hang up and go about there way.


    Asking " is this a bad time?" "can you talk?" "do you have 60 seconds?" "did I reach you at a bad time?" is probably the worst thing you can say in your intro. and by asking whens a good time to call back? they'll give you a time and when the phone rings at that time they'll be sure not to answer it or take the call because they know its you trying to " separate them from there money" cut out the yes or no questions. be aggressive. you can listen to the "gurus" of cold calling here but the fact is until you learn to be a salesman instead of taking the way that makes you feel comfortable youll never see the paycheck you deserve to have. "but SalesGod they are gurus they told me so" really? how many calls did your gurus make today? Listen to my advice and youll become a closer, if you don't its your loss.
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    • Profile picture of the author Wi11iam
      I haven't read from any of the resources you have cited, but I'm thinking the information you have compiled is misinterpreted. A very basic rule to cold calling is to sell the appointment not the product/service.

      -William
      Signature

      William C. Hopkins

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    • Profile picture of the author Marc Rodill
      Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

      This is pretty horrible. "consultive sales" is total BS. The concept was invented by people who are afraid to be aggressive and close. You ask way to many yes or no questions in this pitch. If you used this in real life you'd get hung up on almost every time. If it is working AT ALL your probably losing 70% of the deals you could be closing. YES OR NO QUESTIONS ARE DEADLY. remember your a telemarketer, a solicitor, an annoying salesman, if you give them the chance to stay on the phone and be "sold" by you by asking yes or no questions, they'll always say no so they can hang up and go about there way.
      I disagree. I'm seeing a lot of value here. If they want to hang up, there's nothing stopping them in the first place. I don't see how you can prevent that by being aggressive.

      Plus after doing research on monetizing the problem, it's become clear that I want to sell value, so I'm seeing my job as to mainly disqualifying those out who aren't a good fit for the size of investment I want to offer.

      In addition to that...

      A lot of times a business owner simply can't talk. I never known an owner who isn't constantly in the thick of something. It's not like a consumer sitting at home for example.

      Asking " is this a bad time?" "can you talk?" "do you have 60 seconds?" "did I reach you at a bad time?" is probably the worst thing you can say in your intro.
      Have you tried it? Somehow I don't think so.

      Maybe you should try it first.

      and by asking whens a good time to call back? they'll give you a time and when the phone rings at that time they'll be sure not to answer it or take the call because they know its you trying to " separate them from there money" cut out the yes or no questions.
      I won't be asking them for a good time to call back. That wasn't in the script. But I see your point.

      be aggressive.
      I do plan on being assertive with a qualified prospect.

      you can listen to the "gurus" of cold calling here but the fact is until you learn to be a salesman instead of taking the way that makes you feel comfortable youll never see the paycheck you deserve to have.
      Well, I know how to do a decent pitch. That's not the tough part. In fact, I think pitching the offer is the easiest thing there is. It's just a matter of following the script and saying it like you got something to say.

      Plus, I have reason to believe that a lot of guys using a consultative approach are closing bigger deals and taking home bigger paychecks than those using traditional closing methods.

      Why? Because they're shared numbers.

      I would really like to avoid wasting my time and energy pitching people who can't or won't say yes, for one reason or another. Or who would like to say yes, but can't afford what I have to offer at the price I want to offer it at.

      "but SalesGod they are gurus they told me so" really? how many calls did your gurus make today? Listen to my advice and youll become a closer, if you don't its your loss.
      Well, if you don't mind me asking, what is it that you're selling? And if you feel comfortable sharing your price points, that would be helpful too. Just so I have something tangible and specific to compare.

      EDIT: About monetizing the problem...

      What I got from this, so far, is that if I want to sell a service for $1,997 and be worth it, I need to find business owners who stand to gain ten to twenty times the value, e.g. $20,000 to $40,000 in additional revenue.

      And get THEM to tell me this. So closing becomes easy.

      So that would mean...

      Finding a problem, with my skill-set, that I can solve, that would produce that amount of money.

      This has changed my whole perspective.

      From one of, "Oh, I hope they say yes..." to, "Oh, well I better find out if can produce that amount of revenue for them, based on their average sale, and the number of potential customers I can bring them."

      Which of course would mean: digging.

      'Cause why would I want to fast track the pitch, if their average sale and the number of customers I could bring them, only totaled out to $5,000 for example, based on their current available resources?

      I won't get paid what I want in order to meet MY revenue goals.

      Personally, I think this mentality changes everything.

      It actually makes me WANT to pick up the phone.

      Well, almost.

      It seems that my extremely analytical mind is both my best asset and my worst enemy.
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      Long Lost Warriors! The Secret Sales System! Act Now! Buy Now! Right Now!
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      • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
        Originally Posted by Marc Rodill View Post

        I disagree. I'm seeing a lot of value here. If they want to hang up, there's nothing stopping them in the first place. I don't see how you can prevent that by being aggressive.

        Plus after doing research on monetizing the problem, it's become clear that I want to sell value, so I'm seeing my job as to mainly disqualifying those out who aren't a good fit for the size of investment I want to offer.

        In addition to that...

        A lot of times a business owner simply can't talk. I never known an owner who isn't constantly in the thick of something. It's not like a consumer sitting at home for example.



        Have you tried it? Somehow I don't think so.

        Maybe you should try it first.



        I won't be asking them for a good time to call back. That wasn't in the script. But I see your point.



        I do plan on being assertive with a qualified prospect.



        Well, I know how to do a decent pitch. That's not the tough part. In fact, I think pitching the offer is the easiest thing there is. It's just a matter of following the script and saying it like you got something to say.

        Plus, I have reason to believe that a lot of guys using a consultative approach are closing bigger deals and taking home bigger paychecks than those using traditional closing methods.

        Why? Because they're shared numbers.

        I would really like to avoid wasting my time and energy pitching people who can't or won't say yes, for one reason or another. Or who would like to say yes, but can't afford what I have to offer at the price I want to offer it at.



        Well, if you don't mind me asking, what is it that you're selling? And if you feel comfortable sharing your price points, that would be helpful too. Just so I have something tangible and specific to compare.

        EDIT: About monetizing the problem...

        What I got from this, so far, is that if I want to sell a service for $1,997 and be worth it, I need to find business owners who stand to gain ten to twenty times the value, e.g. $20,000 to $40,000 in additional revenue.

        And get THEM to tell me this. So closing becomes easy.

        So that would mean...

        Finding a problem, with my skill-set, that I can solve, that would produce that amount of money.

        This has changed my whole perspective.

        From one of, "Oh, I hope they say yes..." to, "Oh, well I better find out if can produce that amount of revenue for them, based on their average sale, and the number of potential customers I can bring them."

        Which of course would mean: digging.

        'Cause why would I want to fast track the pitch, if their average sale and the number of customers I could bring them, only totaled out to $5,000 for example, based on their current available resources?

        I won't get paid what I want in order to meet MY revenue goals.

        Personally, I think this mentality changes everything.

        It actually makes me WANT to pick up the phone.

        Well, almost.

        It seems that my extremely analytical mind is both my best asset and my worst enemy.


        I sell marketing services and run a call center
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    • Profile picture of the author animal44
      Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

      "consultive sales" is total BS.
      First thing I seen SalesGod say that I agree with...

      Albeit for different reasons...
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      People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
      What I do for a living

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      • Profile picture of the author Marc Rodill
        Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

        First thing I seen SalesGod say that I agree with...

        Albeit for different reasons...
        Talk reasons to me, you animal!

        EDIT: Guess I should have read this first!

        http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ml#post8362734

        Oops.

        Well, just found it. Makes sense.
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        Long Lost Warriors! The Secret Sales System! Act Now! Buy Now! Right Now!
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Marc Rodill View Post

          Talk reasons to me, you animal!

          EDIT: Guess I should have read this first!

          http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ml#post8362734

          Oops.

          Well, just found it. Makes sense.
          Are you calling for an in person appointment, or are you trying to sell them on the phone?

          My suggestion; Try to come up with one sentence, not a long one, that tells what you do and who you do it for. The clearer the better. Once you craft that sentence, shorten your rebuttals and shorten your description of what you do.

          Talk like a regular person talks, not a marketer. Try to shorten your rebuttals to one sentence. I don't want to rewrite the whole thing for you, But I'm sure Jason would do it, for a fee. Ken Michaels is also great at this.
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Marc, we don't know what the end offer is,
            other than possibly client re-activation.

            Different products and services require different approaches,
            therefore we are limited to how we can help you at this stage.

            I'll give you an example.

            Retail stores get hammered by credit card processing reps.

            If you are in that business you need to understand that environment you are
            going in to correctly prepare yourself going in.

            If you are selling an advertising channel to people
            who haven't used it before, then help them see it's advantages.

            See, 2 extremes of the awareness, hammered to never heard of it.

            Each requiring a different approach going in.

            Best,
            Doctor E. Vile
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          • Profile picture of the author Marc Rodill
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            Are you calling for an in person appointment, or are you trying to sell them on the phone?

            My suggestion; Try to come up with one sentence, not a long one, that tells what you do and who you do it for. The clearer the better. Once you craft that sentence, shorten your rebuttals and shorten your description of what you do.

            Talk like a regular person talks, not a marketer. Try to shorten your rebuttals to one sentence. I don't want to rewrite the whole thing for you, But I'm sure Jason would do it, for a fee. Ken Michaels is also great at this.
            Hey Claude,

            I'll be closing them over the phone. No in person appointments.

            Thanks for your suggestions.

            Jason gave me some sound advice. So I just asked him about this privately...

            But I'll ask it here too:

            I didn't think my 30 second commercial was very long. But it's clear that you differ. I can easily say this in 30 seconds without it being long winded, but now that I think about it...

            I do remember reading many of your scripts and the one sentence WAS much shorter. Being that you have experience in this area, there's a strong chance your right.

            By the way...

            I don't know if this makes a difference, but I sound very natural on the phone. That's probably my biggest asset. I can read an eight page script without you ever knowing it...

            But I guess you're saying the words themselves are too "marketing-speak".

            I'll take that into consideration and give it a quick review.

            These rebuttals are totally untested and I have no idea if they'll work or be easy to say or not. So thank you for the tips. This is what I was looking for.

            Appreciate it!

            Marc, we don't know what the end offer is,
            other than possibly client re-activation.

            Different products and services require different approaches,
            therefore we are limited to how we can help you at this stage.

            I'll give you an example.

            Retail stores get hammered by credit card processing reps.

            If you are in that business you need to understand that environment you are
            going in to correctly prepare yourself going in.

            If you are selling an advertising channel to people
            who haven't used it before, then help them see it's advantages.

            See, 2 extremes of the awareness, hammered to never heard of it.

            Each requiring a different approach going in.

            Best,
            Doctor E. Vile
            I've made a decision. The end offer is going to be re-activation letters for service businesses, preferably with higher margin services. Thanks for the tip about considering the environment.

            My guess, it's in the second category. I don't think they're getting hammered. So the approach will be to help them see the advantages.

            Marc
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            Long Lost Warriors! The Secret Sales System! Act Now! Buy Now! Right Now!
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            • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
              [QUOTE=Marc Rodill;10377369
              I've made a decision. The end offer is going to be re-activation letters for service businesses, preferably with higher margin services. Thanks for the tip about considering the environment.

              My guess, it's in the second category. I don't think they're getting hammered. So the approach will be to help them see the advantages.

              Marc[/QUOTE]

              Marc, I've got the reactivation campaign sent out by a chiropractor
              that brought in $67,500 worth of business in 3 months.

              Maybe we should talk?

              Best,
              Doctor E. Vile
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              • Profile picture of the author Marc Rodill
                Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

                Marc, I've got the reactivation campaign sent out by a chiropractor
                that brought in $67,500 worth of business in 3 months.

                Maybe we should talk?

                Best,
                Doctor E. Vile
                I've sent you a PM, Ewen.

                And taking previous advice from you, and Claude in another thread...

                The approach I would like to take is to send out a prospecting letter, direct them to my phone number if they're interested now, and then follow-up with these leads via phone.

                You've said this has produced the best results for you.

                Makes total sense.
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                • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                  Originally Posted by Marc Rodill View Post

                  I've sent you a PM, Ewen.

                  And taking previous advice from you, and Claude in another thread...

                  The approach I would like to take is to send out a prospecting letter, direct them to my phone number if they're interested now, and then follow-up with these leads via phone.

                  You've said this has produced the best results for you.

                  Makes total sense.
                  I think this changes everything. If they are calling you, it isn't cold calling, and your script is the wrong approach. If they are calling you, why are you then calling them back? Why not just answer your phone?

                  Even if they are calling and leaving their number, you are now returning their call. You are in a much stronger position.

                  Your approach and script are Ok for cold calling, but for returning a call, it's all wrong.

                  In your letter, if you give them enough information to cause them to call, you are going to kill your results by acting like a cold caller.

                  "Hello, I'm Marc Rodill returning (name of CEO) call"
                  "What's this concerning?"

                  "I don't know, he called me. I'm returning his call. Is he in?"

                  I would ask him what problem he thought I could solve. and start from there. Ask him about his business. Make it about you finding out if he has a problem you can solve, rather than trying to sound like a cold caller, and answer objections.

                  Your cold calling script is Ok, but it could use some work to get to the point. But from what you describe, you are not planning on cold calling, and the script would be all wrong.

                  Are you really sure you know how you want to contact these people? May I suggest you also have a very clear idea of who you are going to sell? If you are sending letters, make it very specific to a niche, their problem, your solution for them.
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                  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


                    Are you really sure you know how you want to contact these people? May I suggest you also have a very clear idea of who you are going to sell? If you are sending letters, make it very specific to a niche, their problem, your solution for them.
                    I hoped on a call with Marc, Claude.

                    We covered the whole process from very targeted lists,
                    what to say in the mail piece, the follow up calls, what to say
                    in response to phone ins.

                    He understands the deep psychology on the approach taken
                    so that he can self adjust as to what he encounters.

                    It would be good for Marc to come in now and
                    close this thread, or at least give an update, since he told me
                    he now had everything to run with it.

                    Best,
                    Doctor E. Vile
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      • Profile picture of the author animal44
        Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

        First thing I seen SalesGod say that I agree with...

        Albeit for different reasons...
        It's a contradiction in terms. When you're income is dependant on selling something, you cannot show true independence. You cannot be a "consultant".

        "Consultative selling" is simply a way of fitting what you're selling around what the prospect wants, not necessarily what he truly needs...

        Signed
        Pedantic of Surrey...
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        • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
          Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

          It's a contradiction in terms. When you're income is dependant on selling something, you cannot show true independence. You cannot be a "consultant".

          "Consultative selling" is simply a way of fitting what you're selling around what the prospect wants, not necessarily what he truly needs...

          Signed
          Pedantic of Surrey...
          Sad you have this point of view.

          You could say that about any style of selling.

          The truth is you can have enough going on, and be clear enough with yourself about who you want to work with, that you can say "No, it's not a fit" to anyone.

          I have referred plenty of business to other people and companies who I knew were a better fit for solving someone's problem. Did it just yesterday afternoon with a copywriting gig. And I don't mean just for personal services: I mean for things like accounting & CRM software when I was selling those.

          Top level selling is NOT about making the square peg go into the round hole. It's about qualifying people OUT as quickly as possible who are not a fit, and concentrating on helping those who are a fit. My students know this.

          What you describe is a desperate person with nobody in their funnel, and that's not effective selling.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

          It's a contradiction in terms. When you're income is dependant on selling something, you cannot show true independence. You cannot be a "consultant".
          I get that. And that fits me in most of the selling I've ever done. I was there for a sale, and was "looking out for their best interests" in only a superficial way.

          But in the last several years, it truly is consultative. If they aren't a great fit, I turn it down, and recommend a better course of action.

          But to be able to do that, you have to completely ignore any profit made, until after the interview is over. In other words, it cannot affect your recommendations.

          It may seem like that is impossible to do, but it isn't. But you have to not need the deal.

          This approach isn't out of some altruistic philosophy. I just don't want to expend the energy pitching anymore.
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          • Profile picture of the author quadagon
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

            This approach isn't out of some altruistic philosophy. I just don't want to expend the energy pitching anymore.
            I'm not sure if you find this Claude, but I also think people that come to you this way make the best customers.

            They spend more, renew quicker and cause the back end less 'hassle'.

            It's the clients that have been 'convinced' to join that are a pain in my neck. I now have things in place so sales staff get higher commission on client longevity and renewals.
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by quadagon View Post

              I'm not sure if you find this Claude, but I also think people that come to you this way make the best customers.

              They spend more, renew quicker and cause the back end less 'hassle'.

              It's the clients that have been 'convinced' to join that are a pain in my neck. I now have things in place so sales staff get higher commission on client longevity and renewals.
              When I was speaking to groups, the clients would have the feeling that they came to me, but really...my speaking was the pitch. I was still selling.

              Yeah, people that come to you make better clients. But marketing and selling in a way that allows them to feel like they are coming to you..when you actually went out and found them, gives you the same effect.

              The ones that had to be convinced almost always have different expectations, than the ones that come to you. It's the nature of pitching. And that's where I see most problems.

              Managing expectations while pitching, is a balancing act....and not for the beginner.
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              • Profile picture of the author Diana S.
                I have made thousands of phone calls for my freelance writing practice.

                I never make "cold" calls. If there is nothing warm to be said, the call is not worth making. I don't have to personally know the person, but we need some common bond, such as being in the same industry, being in the same city, belonging to the same professional organization. Especially that last one.

                Cold calls are a waste of time. If you make the calls yourself, you will be much more selective about who you call and will never waste your own time making cold calls.

                My process is simple: Choose a valid person to phone. Phone during business hours. Introduce myself without a lot of useless chatter about the weather. Introduce some credentials or commonality with the prospect. Ask if they use freelancers or if they have thought about it. Shut up and listen.

                Here is how it sometimes sounds: "Hi, this is Diana Schneidman. I'm a freelance writer specializing in the insurance industry. I'm a CLU and CPCU. I'm calling to see if you use freelance writers or have thought about doing it."

                If they answer "yes," continue the conversation. If they say "no" and they have no plans to, offer to send an email introducing your services in case they have a need in the future.

                Many people don't answer the phone but no one hangs up on me.

                If you have gotten your feet wet at phoning and you still think it is distasteful, it's because you are distasteful. Never say anything you feel uncomfortable saying.

                I've written a book that explains the whole process: Real Skills, Real Income: A Proven Marketing System to Land Well-Paid Freelance and Consulting Work in 30 Days or Less.

                -Diana Schneidman
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                Diana Schneidman

                Author, Real Skills, Real Income: A Proven Marketing System to Land Well-Paid Freelance and Consulting Work in 30 Days or Less, available on Amazon

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                • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                  Originally Posted by Diana S. View Post

                  I have made thousands of phone calls for my freelance writing practice.

                  I never make “cold” calls. If there is nothing warm to be said, the call is not worth making. I don’t have to personally know the person, but we need some common bond, such as being in the same industry, being in the same city, belonging to the same professional organization. Especially that last one.

                  Cold calls are a waste of time. If you make the calls yourself, you will be much more selective about who you call and will never waste your own time making cold calls.
                  Your process makes sense, and you are calling a market that isn't antagonistic to your calls. But you already have a warm market. They are used to taking calls from writers. Of course they don't hang up on you.

                  Much like my cold calls to event planners. They never hang up on me, and are always at least civil to me. But I never had anything in common with them, except they were used to talking to speakers, and I was a speaker.

                  But the part I bolded is silly. You don't need anything in common with the prospect. I certainly didn't. Many sales are simply transactional. You are taking your own market, your own approach (which is perfectly valid) and saying that any other approach...no matter the market... is stupid.

                  Had you said, "I cold called for three years, and found a better way. Here is what I found..." that would be different.

                  There are a few people here that make serious money, cold calling.

                  Again, the rest of your post was educational, and useful.
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                • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
                  Originally Posted by Diana S. View Post

                  but we need some common bond, such as being in the same industry, being in the same city, belonging to the same professional organization. Especially that last one.

                  Here is how it sometimes sounds: "Hi, this is Diana Schneidman. I'm a freelance writer specializing in the insurance industry. I'm a CLU and CPCU. I'm calling to see if you use freelance writers or have thought about doing it."
                  However you dress this up, its still cold calling. They don't know you which means its a cold call. I have a common bond of wanting more leads, just like my clients doesn't make that a warm call.
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  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    And shorten your rebuttals. get to the point, if your rebuttal is too long and you have to pause before you continue they'll take that opportunity to interrupt you and end the conversation, or if its to long and they cant interrupt you they'll just hang up. There's techniques for taking breaths when your pitching so they don't have the chance to interrupt before you finish but id suggest just shortening it, working on your questioning techniques, and getting out of the mindset that your a consultant before you work on anything else.
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    • Profile picture of the author Marc Rodill
      Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

      And shorten your rebuttals. get to the point, if your rebuttal is too long and you have to pause before you continue they'll take that opportunity to interrupt you and end the conversation, or if its to long and they cant interrupt you they'll just hang up. There's techniques for taking breaths when your pitching so they don't have the chance to interrupt before you finish but id suggest just shortening it, working on your questioning techniques, and getting out of the mindset that your a consultant before you work on anything else.
      Interesting response. I can see this is a polarizing approach.

      And yes the breaths thing, never end at the end of a sentence. I'm very familiar with that, I do it.

      Originally Posted by Wi11iam View Post

      I haven't read from any of the resources you have cited, but I'm thinking the information you have compiled is misinterpreted. A very basic rule to cold calling is to sell the appointment not the product/service.

      -William
      I don't agree with this "rule".

      One call close as a rule instead, with appointment as a backup. That's been my experience.
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    • Profile picture of the author Regional Warrior
      Originally Posted by SalesGod View Post

      And shorten your rebuttals. get to the point, if your rebuttal is too long and you have to pause before you continue they'll take that opportunity to interrupt you and end the conversation, or if its to long and they cant interrupt you they'll just hang up. There's techniques for taking breaths when your pitching so they don't have the chance to interrupt before you finish but id suggest just shortening it, working on your questioning techniques, and getting out of the mindset that your a consultant before you work on anything else.
      Sorry you Rep went the way of the wazoo when the went on the SEO sub forum took a job for 2K and had to asked for 2 weeks while you found out what It did

      So please let the real Warriors who know what they are talking about answer the thread and you go play with your phones
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      • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
        Originally Posted by Regional Warrior View Post

        Sorry you Rep went the way of the wazoo when the went on the SEO sub forum took a job for 2K and had to asked for 2 weeks while you found out what It did

        So please let the real Warriors who know what they are talking about answer the thread and you go play with your phones

        Please explain what you mean? I do remember going on the SEO forum to get some education about SEO. I'm not sure how me wanting to learn about SEO has to do with me being a phone salesman and giving advice on it. Is the SEO sub forum not for learning about SEO? Iv sold SEO in the past with knowing very minimal. The only posts I see from you are knocking other peoples posts. what do you know about sales? are you going to give the OP advice? How many sales calls have you made today?


        If I recall your the same person that responded to a post saying the only way to sell if have the lowest price and selling based on value is "impossible" correct?
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  • Profile picture of the author dave147
    My attitude these days tends to be similar to the views in this post
    and that is:
    1: Introduce yourself
    2: Explain what you do in 2 sentences.
    3: Find out if there is interest/
    4: Explain your offer.
    5: Close the pitch..

    Then it's either a Yes or a No.

    You should aim to be off the phone within 3 minutes with a commitment or a sale or a meeting, which ever suits your product or service best.

    I'm no cold calling "expert" but that's probably a good thing I'd rather not waste my time dancing around trying to trick them into listening to me or spending too much time trying to convince them to buy...they either want it or not it's as simple as that!
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  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    I simply give advice on what's currently working every single day. If you use the "consultative" approach in live situations you'll very quickly know exactly where I'm coming from. From recording the results of thousands of calls a day, training cold callers, and personally making a couple hundred calls a day I can without a doubt tell you what's working and what isn't. You can take my advice and become a closer or you can listen to theoretical sales approaches that work on paper but not in real life and your bank account will reflect it. The More Phone salesmen that follow the consultive sales approach the better and more valuable my service becomes so witch ever way you go its fine with me.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marc Rodill
    Trust me I appreciate your point of view SalesGod.

    That's exactly why I posted this.

    What do you currently sell?

    Originally Posted by dave147 View Post

    My attitude these days tends to be similar to the views in this post
    and that is:
    1: Introduce yourself
    2: Explain what you do in 2 sentences.
    3: Find out if there is interest/
    4: Explain your offer.
    5: Close the pitch..

    Then it's either a Yes or a No.

    You should aim to be off the phone within 3 minutes with a commitment or a sale or a meeting, which ever suits your product or service best.

    I'm no cold calling "expert" but that's probably a good thing I'd rather not waste my time dancing around trying to trick them into listening to me or spending too much time trying to convince them to buy...they either want it or not it's as simple as that!
    This is pretty much the angle I was thinking about.

    I would also be interested in what you're offering them, especially if we're talking about closing a deal in three minutes. That seems a bit fast-tracked to me for almost any offer unless it was strictly inbound.
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  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    You say "real warriors" witch makes me have to ask you a couple questions. what's a warrior? what's your definition? what makes someone a real warrior as opposed to a fake warrior? is a "real warrior" someone who makes over a certain threshold of income per year? someone who's in a certain industry? or just someone who's been on the forum for a long time? what qualifies someone as a "real warrior"? not that a care about ridiculous labels however id assume the OP and others in this section want to hear advice from successful business people who actually implement the advice they give in live situations day in and day out.
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    Good try... however,

    That pitch is not a pitch. You also have clear buying questions listed under rebuttals.

    What you have is an introduction and a few bullet points.
    You're missing the warm up, the pitch and the close.

    Edit:
    Give me a couple mins I'll find a few links that should help you out.

    - read post 21 for script format

    lol, I guess you only get one link - the WF search isn't working properly today.
    Ill post a few more when it's working again
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