Youtubers make how much?!?

12 replies
Hello everyone,

It's probably no secret how popular and fast the Youtuber market is growing. Since I spend so much time watching YT videos I'd love to create a service that caters specifically to the Youtuber creating videos. Google already offers various affiliate marketing to popular Youtubers but what I'm looking to create is something a bit different.

For example, I tend to watch a lot of videos by YT's that are into make-up and fashion, the make-up industry in itself is growing pretty rapidly so what can I offer to the Youtuber that can make them a profit and me one as well?

Another example would be the sheer amount of influence they have on their viewers, just by wearing a jacket that is NOT endorsed, the viewers will go out immediately and purchase said jacket, of course the Youtuber makes no profit from this but could.

I hope I'm making sense I would love some ideas and suggestions on a service that I could start that combines my love for YT and for making money!

Thanks in advance!!
#make #offline #youtubers
  • Profile picture of the author visimedia
    one of the youtubers claimed that they make lots of cash, but I then turned out to watch 1 youtubers that's showing his accoutn, making a month like $3k.. which is a lot less than what others claimed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nikkijuharris
      Yea I'm sure a lot of them falsify what they make but I know PERSONALLY two YT's that make a nice living from making YT videos. So this service would most likely benefit those already making a nice income and those who are gaining more popularity daily.

      Thanks though!
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by visimedia View Post

      one of the youtubers claimed that they make lots of cash, but I then turned out to watch 1 youtubers that's showing his accoutn, making a month like $3k.. which is a lot less than what others claimed.
      Forbes put out a YouTube earning list for 2015.
      Starts with 12 mill goes down to 2.5 mill

      I don't know how much if any fact checking went into that.
      ... Pretty interesting tho

      Forbes Welcome
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    • Profile picture of the author yukon
      Banned
      Originally Posted by visimedia View Post

      one of the youtubers claimed that they make lots of cash, but I then turned out to watch 1 youtubers that's showing his accoutn, making a month like $3k.. which is a lot less than what others claimed.
      Are you suggesting everyone in the world doesn't earn the same amount of money?






      Originally Posted by doanxuanhoang View Post

      I admire everyone
      Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vladan1989
    i think there is no place for newbies here. only those who are already earning can earn.
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  • Profile picture of the author bigdawg69
    If you only do video advertisements the average is about 1$ for every 1000 views. The majority of youtubers don't take advantage of the massive reach they have though. If they were to use their viewership to it's max and gather an email list through a connected website and offer promoted videos they could make a fortune, but the majority have zero business sense.
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  • Profile picture of the author BillyParadise
    From last year... The Average YouTube CPM Is $7.60, But Making Money Isn’t Easy

    The Average YouTube CPM is $7.60, But Making Money Isn't Easy
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  • Profile picture of the author Rearden
    YouTube has been responsible for an exponential growth in my life insurance recruiting business.

    Thanks specifically to Claude for suggesting this one idea in his book, as it wouldn't have happened if it wasn't for him.
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    David Duford -- Providing On-Going, Personalized Mentorship And Training From A Real Final Expense Producer To Agents New To The Final Expense Life Insurance Business.
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  • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
    Making money on YT isn't that hard when you enjoy it. I've sold everything from CB products to local services to my own products.

    3 years ago it was pretty simple. Just upload a video, boost it, rank & bank.

    These days you gotta make content that's like crack to your target audience. You gotta test it. Then share it with them. Example, I love music. Have a studio been making music 15 years now.

    When you're involved in a niche you can spot market gaps (or trends) pretty easily.

    I noticed a trend where people don't really need or want long complicated tutorials. They don't really care to see how a song was made from soup to nuts. Most the time they're just interested in a specific segment of that song.

    Like gangnam style. I knew when that came out lots of noobs wanted to know how the bass was made. I also knew how amateur producers would respond. Most these people don't monetize (properly I should say) or do quick, sloppy work. So I took my time, monetized it on the back end then shared. I shared on my draft account (a YT account I test on) and 2 forums. It's a great feeling when people share your shit and don't care it's monetized. Then I scaled up. Hit up every relevant music forum and quickly moved the video to my main account. Overnight got a small army of "free affiliates" aka fans. I woke up the next day, earnings updated to almost $200 in less than 12 hours. A couple weeks later they plateaued around $10-$20 / day. But its passive income. When you have lots of videos it adds up. And you don't need to be a genius to scale or figure out the math.

    There are other examples I can give but you asked how much youtubers make.

    Back in 2013 youtube was unbelievably easy. I worked up to $200 / day uploading half decent video reviews and spamming them to death with retention views & GSA. Back then I know LOTS of YT marketers were making coin.

    After youtube cleaned up things ... after Google cleaned up things (they deranked tons of health videos ranking on page 1) a lot of video marketers quit. Even I quit YT for like 9 months. I still used it for local marketing (bread and butter) but with blackhat techniques becoming less effective I couldn't compete in normal affiliate niches.

    Niches like, "how to make money online fast" "best way to lose weight" "how to cure hypothyroidism" "how to stop masturbating" "how to speak french" etc etc. I was grabbing top 5 spots over and over just by spamming.

    These days lots has changed. Gaming G with PBNs will never die. But YT requires a good deal of old fashioned whitehat marketing.

    As far as fashion and makeup that shits like Latin to me. I know lots of women are into it. I know 1 with a fashion blog ranked on G. Think she does 2-3 grand a month. I know another who's been struggling for over a year on YT. I tried helping her at some point but some people just don't get it. She wasn't organized. Talking about weird things or politics in her videos. Refused to test properly. Just not a business oriented person.

    If you're gonna go for fashion and makeup ... I can't advise you since you didn't lay out a real plan. In big niches I look for gaps and trends I understand. Like fashion to me is artsy as hell. I'm sure music is artsy to other people. But since I just know a lot about music I know how to systematize my "art" for mass consumption.

    Then there's form vs content.

    Two people can have great content but without good form or execution only 1 will make money.

    Maybe 1 has a strong following on Instagram, Facebook, or some fashion forum. I have old accounts on a ton of music sites. I'm not very active. But active enough so people know my name and know I always try to share good content. I also always microtest before macrotesting, or rolling out to my main YT account. Even things I'm super confident about I like to test. Like just uploading to a few small forums. If responses isn't as I expect, that video stays away from my main account. The better the response the bigger and faster I share. Facebook does this with all their new roll outs. They always test updates on a small group. If that goes well they roll out to the masses. Use this same concept when you promote.

    It's like hunch crunching. You crunch a hunch with data so you know it's no longer a hunch but a true desire people have. Do this enough eventually you'll gain a 6th sense for what people want in your niche.

    Always know ahead of time how you will monetize. Become an amazon affiliate. Make a website and instagram. Sell your own products it doesn't matter. What matters is that you take action, test, and use your brain.

    If something doesn't work ask for help. This is another benefit of keeping multiple YT accounts. If something fails it's on an account with other failed ideas. So I don't have to worry about people stealing my shit which they will if given the opportunity.

    -RS
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

      Making money on YT isn't that hard when you enjoy it. I've sold everything from CB products to local services to my own products.

      3 years ago it was pretty simple. Just upload a video, boost it, rank & bank.

      These days you gotta make content that's like crack to your target audience. You gotta test it. Then share it with them. Example, I love music. Have a studio been making music 15 years now.

      When you're involved in a niche you can spot market gaps (or trends) pretty easily.

      I noticed a trend where people don't really need or want long complicated tutorials. They don't really care to see how a song was made from soup to nuts. Most the time they're just interested in a specific segment of that song.

      Like gangnam style. I knew when that came out lots of noobs wanted to know how the bass was made. I also knew how amateur producers would respond. Most these people don't monetize (properly I should say) or do quick, sloppy work. So I took my time, monetized it on the back end then shared. I shared on my draft account (a YT account I test on) and 2 forums. It's a great feeling when people share your shit and don't care it's monetized. Then I scaled up. Hit up every relevant music forum and quickly moved the video to my main account. Overnight got a small army of "free affiliates" aka fans. I woke up the next day, earnings updated to almost $200 in less than 12 hours. A couple weeks later they plateaued around $10-$20 / day. But its passive income. When you have lots of videos it adds up. And you don't need to be a genius to scale or figure out the math.

      There are other examples I can give but you asked how much youtubers make.

      Back in 2013 youtube was unbelievably easy. I worked up to $200 / day uploading half decent video reviews and spamming them to death with retention views & GSA. Back then I know LOTS of YT marketers were making coin.

      After youtube cleaned up things ... after Google cleaned up things (they deranked tons of health videos ranking on page 1) a lot of video marketers quit. Even I quit YT for like 9 months. I still used it for local marketing (bread and butter) but with blackhat techniques becoming less effective I couldn't compete in normal affiliate niches.

      Niches like, "how to make money online fast" "best way to lose weight" "how to cure hypothyroidism" "how to stop masturbating" "how to speak french" etc etc. I was grabbing top 5 spots over and over just by spamming.

      These days lots has changed. Gaming G with PBNs will never die. But YT requires a good deal of old fashioned whitehat marketing.

      As far as fashion and makeup that shits like Latin to me. I know lots of women are into it. I know 1 with a fashion blog ranked on G. Think she does 2-3 grand a month. I know another who's been struggling for over a year on YT. I tried helping her at some point but some people just don't get it. She wasn't organized. Talking about weird things or politics in her videos. Refused to test properly. Just not a business oriented person.

      If you're gonna go for fashion and makeup ... I can't advise you since you didn't lay out a real plan. In big niches I look for gaps and trends I understand. Like fashion to me is artsy as hell. I'm sure music is artsy to other people. But since I just know a lot about music I know how to systematize my "art" for mass consumption.

      Then there's form vs content.

      Two people can have great content but without good form or execution only 1 will make money.

      Maybe 1 has a strong following on Instagram, Facebook, or some fashion forum. I have old accounts on a ton of music sites. I'm not very active. But active enough so people know my name and know I always try to share good content. I also always microtest before macrotesting, or rolling out to my main YT account. Even things I'm super confident about I like to test. Like just uploading to a few small forums. If responses isn't as I expect, that video stays away from my main account. The better the response the bigger and faster I share. Facebook does this with all their new roll outs. They always test updates on a small group. If that goes well they roll out to the masses. Use this same concept when you promote.

      It's like hunch crunching. You crunch a hunch with data so you know it's no longer a hunch but a true desire people have. Do this enough eventually you'll gain a 6th sense for what people want in your niche.

      Always know ahead of time how you will monetize. Become an amazon affiliate. Make a website and instagram. Sell your own products it doesn't matter. What matters is that you take action, test, and use your brain.

      If something doesn't work ask for help. This is another benefit of keeping multiple YT accounts. If something fails it's on an account with other failed ideas. So I don't have to worry about people stealing my shit which they will if given the opportunity.

      -RS
      Good to see you back, Red.

      This post of yours gives great perspective and will help a lot of people.

      What I see in YT is the same as blogging or other content marketing forms...people jump in, do a little work, and then give up. They don't get that flywheel turning. It takes sustained effort, well past the point of "Gee, this doesn't seem to be working."
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      • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        Good to see you back, Red.

        This post of yours gives great perspective and will help a lot of people.

        What I see in YT is the same as blogging or other content marketing forms...people jump in, do a little work, and then give up. They don't get that flywheel turning. It takes sustained effort, well past the point of "Gee, this doesn't seem to be working."
        I'd like to also extend a warm greeting to Red.

        Looking at the discussion I was lurking around on the sidelines for a few reasons.

        I do make a good income from youtube and often when one gives people advice about what can work for them the gratitude is somewhat lacking.

        The income from youtube is not just adsense revenue although there is revenue that get recycled back into adwords from monetising videos that are posted.

        The real income is made outside Youtube by several means that usually involves sending traffic to somewhere.

        It is not as much as "sending" but "inviting" people who enjoy what you share to come to somewhere else where they can continue to enjoy and build a better relationship with you.

        Youtube provides a wonderful platform to self publish and when you gradually build a following because you have added value to people's lives they are usually quite happy to support you by paying for the "unique" perspective or training you offer.

        Much like any social media platform Youtube is only part of a wider marketing funnel and it does require attention to make it function as a contributor to your success.

        Whenever I set up any new venture or are working as a consultant to established businesses one of the first things we make sure is in place is a Youtube presence.

        Much like Bob explains...

        I'm also probably one of the few marketers out there who's direct mailing to youtube subscribers (via funnels that get their physical addresses), and it's absolutely killing it.
        These strategies and similar "off YT" methods are where you really make the money.

        Why do you think every celebrity wants a "fragrance" a "fitness product" etc etc.

        Money is in the off tube monetization.

        I'm not saying there isn't money to be made directly on YT....

        ...but the wise marketers know it is just one cog in a larger machine.

        I once listened to Alex Mandossian talking about what he coined as the "Grand Unification" of social media.

        His observations were that in each social channel you worked in it was a advisable to have a plan to cohesively publish selective "tidbits" that lead back to your...

        "Main Offering"

        The main offering was where you made your profit.

        What you sell is largely irrelevant.

        How you move the audience to a position where they will buy...

        ...that is the key.
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  • Profile picture of the author bob ross
    I have a few YT clients, one being a very large one with hundreds of thousands of views per video and a rabid subscriber base.

    Even with that kind of traffic, YT doesn't pay anything significant for monetization. In order for this particular client to make a comfortable living from YT full-time they rely on Patreon and other channels that I've setup for them such as email marketing, free guide downloads, physical merchandise, digital products, etc.

    Youtube is really smart and just seems to promote good content to the right people, but we've found that the real key to driving up organic youtube traffic comes down to the title and thumbnail image. You can basically scroll through a video list and know based on the title and thumbnail which one will have the most views. I'm also probably one of the few marketers out there who's direct mailing to youtube subscribers (via funnels that get their physical addresses), and it's absolutely killing it.
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