Does anyone here do this for offline businesses?

by umc
29 replies
So, I don't know what to call this, but from my experiences with local service businesses it seems that they have a problem creating a database of their clients and following up with them. I'll use two specific examples.

I bought a new hvac system. They were supposed to come back and do a clean and check of the system in the first year for free and then they would offer me a chance to buy a contract for the next year. They never, ever followed up. Eventually I called them and asked for my free service a couple of years later. We then signed a contract for the next year. They had told me a few times during the first couple of years that they'd be in contact, but they never did. How many other contracts did they leave on the table? How many missed years of simple service contracts did they miss out on? They never asked for referrals, though I've given them several just because I'm that guy. They put a yard sign in my yard for all of a day or two and picked it up. So many missed opportunities here.

I had a few reasons come up to work with a local plumbing company, a fairly big one. I bought a one time contract with them after having them out for a few different things that gives me a discount on some services and a free annual checkup and cleaning of things like my water heater, shutoff valves, faucets, etc. They never followed up to schedule anything either, waiting on me to do so. They were missing out on opportunities to come in, check things out, keep in top of mind position for me, and to possibly find something wrong that they could charge me for. They had an invitation each year into my home that I even paid for so that they could find things wrong to fix and charge me more for, yet nobody ever followed up even once. I eventually called them.

So, does anyone offer a service to fix these kinds of processes and carry them out for such service businesses? Most service businesses seem so busy doing the work and getting new customers that they completely overlook the ones they already have and the opportunities for referrals and more work that they represent.

I think I'd like to maybe get into offering a service to help these companies do this but have no real experience other than what my wife and I do in our cleaning business, where we do follow up with people, though for the most part we see them on a regular basis anyway. I don't know how to structure something like this or even what to call it.

Any input?
#businesses #offline
  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    Originally Posted by umc View Post

    So, does anyone offer a service to fix these kinds of processes and carry them out for such service businesses? Most service businesses seem so busy doing the work and getting new customers that they completely overlook the ones they already have and the opportunities for referrals and more work that they represent.

    Any input?
    This is one of the first things I usually identify during the initial consultation and review of any prospective clients.

    Many businesses have customer databases in their accounting systems but do not utilise those contacts for marketing and followup service.

    Before working on generating leads or other front end actions you do need to make sure you have the backend processes in place.

    CRM services like Infusionsoft or Active Campaign amongst others will handle what you are trying to do.

    Setting those systems up with the right follow up sequences is one the most important things before you go out and work on anything else.

    Best regards,

    Ozi
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  • Profile picture of the author umc
    Funny you should mention such CRM software. Nobody has ever asked for my email address. Not one of these companies. It is the one of the first things we get in our cleaning business.

    So does anyone here focus on I guess what is essentially list building for these companies? Helping them to implement strategies to actually ask for emails, then following up with these customers?

    I have no desire to be a catch all service provider where I try to sell a myriad of services to businesses like web design, seo, social media marketing, etc. This is one area that I've personally been frustrated with watching other businesses struggle with. Does anyone focus on this area? What would one call it? I'm interested in looking into other models that do that already if they exist, but I don't even know what to call it. I'm open to creating a service of my own and taking it out to companies if need be. I just wondered if this in and of itself was something that exists already as a standalone service that someone is presenting in a system as some sort of package.
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    • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
      Originally Posted by umc View Post

      Funny you should mention such CRM software. Nobody has ever asked for my email address. Not one of these companies. It is the one of the first things we get in our cleaning business.

      So does anyone here focus on I guess what is essentially list building for these companies? Helping them to implement strategies to actually ask for emails, then following up with these customers?
      The CRM systems don't just have to focus on emails.

      In fact we find the highest response and use we make of them for clients is with phone numbers and setting the follow up sequences for staff to use.

      In many circumstances a reminder can be issued for a staff member to post a letter to a past client. These can easily be created and merged but the greatest success using this strategy is with handwritten envelopes and hand written annotations on the merged letter.

      Amazing what a small post-it note on a service reminder letter can do for response rates.

      It does take a little longer to put the pieces together but for most smaller companies there is usually adequate rewards for adding personal touches.

      You could position yourself as a "retention specialist"

      Coming from a cleaning business background you could use personal experiences of how you discovered the greatest income was generated by long term clients who renewed their service contracts and so you developed an integrated retention system for service businesses to help them minimize their attrition rates and boost their reputation and maximise profitability.

      Best regards,

      Ozi
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      • Profile picture of the author umc
        Originally Posted by Oziboomer View Post

        The CRM systems don't just have to focus on emails.

        In fact we find the highest response and use we make of them for clients is with phone numbers and setting the follow up sequences for staff to use.

        In many circumstances a reminder can be issued for a staff member to post a letter to a past client. These can easily be created and merged but the greatest success using this strategy is with handwritten envelopes and hand written annotations on the merged letter.

        Amazing what a small post-it note on a service reminder letter can do for response rates.

        It does take a little longer to put the pieces together but for most smaller companies there is usually adequate rewards for adding personal touches.

        You could position yourself as a "retention specialist"

        Coming from a cleaning business background you could use personal experiences of how you discovered the greatest income was generated by long term clients who renewed their service contracts and so you developed an integrated retention system for service businesses to help them minimize their attrition rates and boost their reputation and maximise profitability.

        Best regards,

        Ozi
        The funny thing about my background is that we don't even use contracts in our business. We just keep in touch with people and they have no need to look elsewhere. The truth is that I don't follow up like I should because my personal business schedule is full and my wife and I have a waiting list. So I have lots of marketing ideas I've never even been able to try out because we have nothing to do with the extra interest that we would get. My wife is dead set against expanding and dealing with employees so we keep the business small, just the two of us.

        I like the idea of customer retention specialization. I really think so many businesses are missing opportunities and leaving easy cash on the table. They're so busy chasing new customers that they overlook what they already have.

        Do most service businesses (let's say home service businesses to be more specific) even have a customer database? I have to wonder if most do. I wonder if most of them have anything more than boxes full of invoices. It could be a lot of work just building some sort of database at the beginning, but there should be some easy pickings. Not only could there be more business to be had, but it could be a great way to get some online reviews and such as well.

        If a person could get multiple home services businesses that they worked with, I would think that they could see about joint ventures through some sort of combined newsletter or something sent out to all of the customers of each company involved and utilize cross promotion. I see lots of opportunities if structured correctly.
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        • Profile picture of the author BUFFALOBT
          Originally Posted by umc View Post

          The funny thing about my background is that we don't even use contracts in our business. We just keep in touch with people and they have no need to look elsewhere. The truth is that I don't follow up like I should because my personal business schedule is full and my wife and I have a waiting list. So I have lots of marketing ideas I've never even been able to try out because we have nothing to do with the extra interest that we would get. My wife is dead set against expanding and dealing with employees so we keep the business small, just the two of us.

          I like the idea of customer retention specialization. I really think so many businesses are missing opportunities and leaving easy cash on the table. They're so busy chasing new customers that they overlook what they already have.

          Do most service businesses (let's say home service businesses to be more specific) even have a customer database? I have to wonder if most do. I wonder if most of them have anything more than boxes full of invoices. It could be a lot of work just building some sort of database at the beginning, but there should be some easy pickings. Not only could there be more business to be had, but it could be a great way to get some online reviews and such as well.

          If a person could get multiple home services businesses that they worked with, I would think that they could see about joint ventures through some sort of combined newsletter or something sent out to all of the customers of each company involved and utilize cross promotion. I see lots of opportunities if structured correctly.
          UMC...your last idea here is exactly what I've been thinking about putting together. Basically...a "networking group" of local service businesses who I would help to cross-promote each other, along with setting up an effective referral program for existing clients.

          Would love to bounce around these ideas with you.
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  • Profile picture of the author dave147
    Good idea! You could call it a "Customer Retention Service" or a "Customer Returning Service" (CRS)
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  • Profile picture of the author SiteSmarty
    UMC. We are all guilty of lousy follow-up at one time or another. Why not offer a push notification service that pushes the notification to the company and the customer at the same time so they receive a mobile message. The company would pay you a monthly fee. You could have 3 tiers. Low price, medium and ridiculous, the medium is the most popular.

    >> When I have a doctors appointment, they notify me before hand on mobile.
    >> I wasn't changing my furnace filter often enough so I set it up a reminder on my calendar so it notifies me when I need to change the filter. Before that I just forgot to do it.

    There must be services like that already. Maybe find a white label service and sell it or come up with your own system.
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  • Profile picture of the author dave147
    The set-up would all start with the email address.

    Most home services businesses today will have an organised email database.

    Retrieve the existing database, use Email address, Name, Job Desicription, Date of job.

    Create generic email, with reminder / service offerings & incentive!

    Create follow up emails.
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  • Profile picture of the author animal44
    Originally Posted by umc View Post

    So, does anyone offer a service to fix these kinds of processes and carry them out for such service businesses?
    Pretty much what we do. We work mostly with larger businesses, though there are some service and retail businesses we still work with. We call it customer reactivation, though we don't necessarily use that term with clients. It's better to have a benefit laden phrase than a label...

    A while back we were offering email marketing as a community newsletter type offering. Those smaller businesses who didn't want to run their own email were persuaded to place a signup on their site in return for special advertising rates. Worked quite well in building a local emailing list for which one could sell advertising/offers...
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    • Profile picture of the author ShayB
      I know I am not as techy as some, so I have a very low-tech solution I offer biz colleagues for this.

      It's on the principle of a "Tickler File," that I learned from a friend who was in the insurance biz.

      1. Set the biz up with Google Calendar. (Many people use it themselves, but they don't realize you can have multiple calendars.)

      2. When they say they will follow up with someone, they go to that date (3 months, 6 months, etc.) and schedule "Follow up with John Smith." They can enter the info for John Smith on the calendar entry (I usually use a phone number on mine), or they can have a database separate from the calendar. They set up alerts for a week in advance so they know what's coming for the next week.

      3. When done with that follow-up, they then schedule the next one. (Or they can schedule several at once.)

      I know most of you are probably rolling your eyes at this, but to a very low-tech biz owner, it's magic and sorcery. Seriously.

      Of course, if you're doing it for yourself as a biz model, you can use whatever fancy tech you like.
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      • Profile picture of the author umc
        Originally Posted by ShayRockhold View Post

        I know I am not as techy as some, so I have a very low-tech solution I offer biz colleagues for this.

        It's on the principle of a "Tickler File," that I learned from a friend who was in the insurance biz.

        1. Set the biz up with Google Calendar. (Many people use it themselves, but they don't realize you can have multiple calendars.)

        2. When they say they will follow up with someone, they go to that date (3 months, 6 months, etc.) and schedule "Follow up with John Smith." They can enter the info for John Smith on the calendar entry (I usually use a phone number on mine), or they can have a database separate from the calendar. They set up alerts for a week in advance so they know what's coming for the next week.

        3. When done with that follow-up, they then schedule the next one. (Or they can schedule several at once.)

        I know most of you are probably rolling your eyes at this, but to a very low-tech biz owner, it's magic and sorcery. Seriously.

        Of course, if you're doing it for yourself as a biz model, you can use whatever fancy tech you like.
        Is this something you charge for? Do you do something more than setup, like actually following up in some way, or maybe offer this as a foot in the door technique? I'm all for high or low tech, whatever works.
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        • Profile picture of the author ShayB
          Originally Posted by umc View Post

          Is this something you charge for? Do you do something more than setup, like actually following up in some way, or maybe offer this as a foot in the door technique? I'm all for high or low tech, whatever works.
          I've helped friends for free. I've charged a consultation fee to walk others through it.

          Never really thought of offering it as a full-blown biz model, but you probably could. I know I've had biz owners ask me to show their staff after showing them, instead of them trying to relay the info. You could charge a monthly fee to help coordinate things. All sorts of possibilities. Maybe set it up so that they get an email with a list of followups for the upcoming week. Or see what works best for your clients.

          Foot in the door technique? Absolutely could be used for that.

          Edited to add: If they have a secretary, having a list of clients to follow up with during the week is a GREAT way to keep them busy.
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      • Profile picture of the author Joe Mobley
        Originally Posted by ShayRockhold View Post


        I know most of you are probably rolling your eyes at this, but to a very low-tech biz owner, it's magic and sorcery. Seriously.

        Yep!

        It is interesting at the numbers of people that will pay for a service that they could get for free.

        I believe that they just don't want to deal with the details of something they don't understand.

        And to them I say,

        Thanks!



        Joe Mobley
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    • Profile picture of the author umc
      Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

      Pretty much what we do. We work mostly with larger businesses, though there are some service and retail businesses we still work with. We call it customer reactivation, though we don't necessarily use that term with clients. It's better to have a benefit laden phrase than a label...

      A while back we were offering email marketing as a community newsletter type offering. Those smaller businesses who didn't want to run their own email were persuaded to place a signup on their site in return for special advertising rates. Worked quite well in building a local emailing list for which one could sell advertising/offers...
      If you don't mind sharing:

      1. What is the benefit laden phrase, or something close if you don't want to be exact, that you use with clients? If nothing else, what is the benefit you focus on?

      2. Do you track results and charge a percentage? If so, how do you track? Or do you handle this on some sort of monthly retainer? In either case, what's a fair percentage, or price, or some sort of range to consider?

      3. Why did you stop offering the email newsletter type of marketing? Any tips on offering such?

      I've always been intrigued with your model. I know you're not a fan of cold calling, and I have read your blog here and sent you a pm, but you posted once that you'd rather be open on the forum discussions than be inundated with pm's. So I hope you're willing to share and that I haven't asked anything too proprietary.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    It does not have to be limited to home service businesses either.
    Hotels can use such a system for holiday greetings and off season deals...
    Salons, dentists, doctors, restaurants... where there should be a lot of repeat business

    A friend owned a tanning salon and when he first took it over, he was complaining about how
    the seller probably lied about income and he was not doing well. I told him to go through the
    boxes and boxes of handwritten registration cards and try to get those customers to come back.
    It would be work to put those into a CRM or database, and there would be a lot who've since moved,
    but they should have had phone, email, and mailing addresses.

    Include an incentive for referrals...
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    • Profile picture of the author animal44
      Originally Posted by umc View Post

      If you don't mind sharing:

      1. What is the benefit laden phrase, or something close if you don't want to be exact, that you use with clients? If nothing else, what is the benefit you focus on?
      I don't want to disclose ours - it's around making more sales without additional advertising overheads- I'll give this some more thought and perhaps post some sort of tutorial later (I'm still on holiday).
      Originally Posted by umc View Post

      2. Do you track results and charge a percentage? If so, how do you track? Or do you handle this on some sort of monthly retainer? In either case, what's a fair percentage, or price, or some sort of range to consider?
      Yes, I track results and yes our standard charge is 20% of incremental profit (sales - cost of fulfilment - cost of campaign).
      Tracking is dependant on what capability client has and how orders are taken. Might be separate tel numbers, special webpage, or just a package name or coupon code.
      When I first started doing this I asked for a one off setup fee/retainer plus 20% commission. Now I typically take a monthly retainer plus 20% commission. I have taken 50%-100% commission on some deals.
      What's fair is whatever you can negotiate :-). For retainers or setup fees, if you think in terms of how much they're currently spending on advertising, and their ROI, you'll get some idea of what fees you can charge.
      Originally Posted by umc View Post

      3. Why did you stop offering the email newsletter type of marketing? Any tips on offering such?
      I didn't stop, I just passed the management/editing to someone else who does all the work. I retain ownership and have future plans.
      Tips? - Don't do it...!
      Or at least understand there is quite a bit of up front work before you start earning.
      Study the free magazines that drop through the post to get ideas on what your local audience wants.
      Our biggest growth in subscribers was from local offers and what's on in the local area.
      Ask local businesses who don't have an email signup if they'll carry your signup form on their website, offer cheap ad rates forever in return or whatever else you can offer them. You'll benefit from their existing traffic.
      Haven't tried this, but you might be able to do a deal with the existing postal magazines to build their email list for a share of the profits.
      Originally Posted by umc View Post

      I know you're not a fan of cold calling
      Don't know what makes you think that...!
      Actually it's the untargeted marketing that I object to. If you've done your research and have a good reason to call - from the prospect's point of view - then I'd find cold calling acceptable. However, from my own measurements I think any cold calling is an inefficient use of your time and I believe there are far better ways of getting clients...
      Originally Posted by umc View Post

      So I hope you're willing to share and that I haven't asked anything too proprietary.
      If I'm not willing to share something, I'll say so!
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
        Originally Posted by animal44 View Post

        I'll give this some more thought and perhaps post some sort of tutorial later (I'm still on holiday).
        More information would be very helpful to some of us if you have the time or inclination to provide it.

        Thanks.
        Mark
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        • Profile picture of the author animal44
          Originally Posted by Mark Singletary View Post

          More information would be very helpful to some of us if you have the time or inclination to provide it.

          Thanks.
          Mark
          Here's an attempt at more information...
          http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...do-you-do.html
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          • Profile picture of the author TheShark
            Yes,

            I've done it for my own business and several others - even teach at least 1 hour on it at my 8 hour seminar - including handouts they can modify.

            The problem - it's hard to sell to service businesses - they are notoriously bad at follow up - the attorneys I know that do it, make a killing and then others have systems and don't use.

            Example: Without going into fine details, I get paid a lot by one criminal law office - they have yet to do the follow up on over 1,000 clients eligible for more easy work - I even set up the system for them - they never use the system (they literally only had to hit print).

            Another is in family law - I set up a system for them (almost an exact copy of the criminal system, but modified only slightly)- they do it and it now accounts for over 23% of their gross income.

            The first attorney's income has been going down and the 2nd has been going up - one follows up

            A few people will do it, they almost all acknowledge that it needs to be done. The market is this: 1) Teaching them it needs to be done 2) Doing it for them.

            Part 1 is hard because if it is a lucrative service business (lawyers, dentists, doctors, etc) - they are bombarded with - LET US MAKE YOU MONEY calls, letters, emails, faxes, every day of the week (we personally get at least 15 plus phones calls a day, even after our black list blocking calls - and that is just in our 1 office).

            Part 2 - can be easy if you can get them taught and to trust you to do it.

            Just my 2 cents (actually more).
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            • Profile picture of the author umc
              Originally Posted by TheShark View Post

              Yes,

              I've done it for my own business and several others - even teach at least 1 hour on it at my 8 hour seminar - including handouts they can modify.

              The problem - it's hard to sell to service businesses - they are notoriously bad at follow up - the attorneys I know that do it, make a killing and then others have systems and don't use.

              Example: Without going into fine details, I get paid a lot by one criminal law office - they have yet to do the follow up on over 1,000 clients eligible for more easy work - I even set up the system for them - they never use the system (they literally only had to hit print).

              Another is in family law - I set up a system for them (almost an exact copy of the criminal system, but modified only slightly)- they do it and it now accounts for over 23% of their gross income.

              The first attorney's income has been going down and the 2nd has been going up - one follows up

              A few people will do it, they almost all acknowledge that it needs to be done. The market is this: 1) Teaching them it needs to be done 2) Doing it for them.

              Part 1 is hard because if it is a lucrative service business (lawyers, dentists, doctors, etc) - they are bombarded with - LET US MAKE YOU MONEY calls, letters, emails, faxes, every day of the week (we personally get at least 15 plus phones calls a day, even after our black list blocking calls - and that is just in our 1 office).

              Part 2 - can be easy if you can get them taught and to trust you to do it.

              Just my 2 cents (actually more).
              Thanks for the share. I guess what I don't understand is that you say on one hand to do it for them, but then lament that they don't follow up. So are you setting things up and then doing the follow through or just selling them the system and leaving it up to them? You mention that the criminal law office is paying you but not following through and the family law is. So, where is the follow through not happening? Or is it that you're willing and being paid to do the follow up, but they aren't giving you the customer lists to do so with?

              Always nice to hear from people that are actually doing the thing.
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  • Profile picture of the author overmind
    thank you for your informations
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    It seems that the tracking could get problematic. Take healthcare providers, for example.

    There may be 300 practice management software setups that are in common use by specialty and even size of the practice. Joe Patient/Prospect gets an email, clicks the link or makes the phone call (to a special number) to set an appointment.

    Many insurance plans don't pay for up to 2 months. Then they don't pay everything because the patient has to pay a copayment or coinsurance either at the time of service or after insurance pays. Many times there are payment reductions by the insurance company or even flat out denials due to some technicality and the provider is stuck trying to collect money from the patient. By the time the provider knows the problem, the patient may have already had several visits.

    Many providers have a long list of collection accounts where patients are cut off and sent out to a collection agency because they can't pay since they expected the insurance to pay.

    HIPAA compliance issues also may make some providers not willing to share enough information to determine a definite result.

    In situations like this it seems that tracking results and getting paid based on results could get messy or am I missing something? Is there an easier way? Would a flat fee work better until it could all be figured out? Or am I overthinking it?

    Mark
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
      Originally Posted by Mark Singletary View Post

      It seems that the tracking could get problematic. Take healthcare providers, for example.

      There may be 300 practice management software setups that are in common use by specialty and even size of the practice. Joe Patient/Prospect gets an email, clicks the link or makes the phone call (to a special number) to set an appointment.

      Many insurance plans don't pay for up to 2 months. Then they don't pay everything because the patient has to pay a copayment or coinsurance either at the time of service or after insurance pays. Many times there are payment reductions by the insurance company or even flat out denials due to some technicality and the provider is stuck trying to collect money from the patient. By the time the provider knows the problem, the patient may have already had several visits.

      Many providers have a long list of collection accounts where patients are cut off and sent out to a collection agency because they can't pay since they expected the insurance to pay.

      HIPAA compliance issues also may make some providers not willing to share enough information to determine a definite result.

      In situations like this it seems that tracking results and getting paid based on results could get messy or am I missing something? Is there an easier way? Would a flat fee work better until it could all be figured out? Or am I overthinking it?

      Mark
      Mark,

      I'm not going to get into HIPAA, insurance and some of the other things that you've mentioned...for the reasons that you've mentioned.

      Instead, what I've done is looked around and found other kinds of businesses, who share the same kind of customers. Then, I established referral partnerships between those businesses.

      To solve the tracking problem, I use a printed gift certificate.

      These are distributed by a (host) business to all of it's customers. The (beneficiary)
      business collects the redeemed certificates, in a container that I provide and have access to.

      I or someone I send, stop in periodically, and pick up the collected certificates.

      It's a simple system, that works quite well..

      Ron
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  • Profile picture of the author umc
    Mark, I don't think anyone mentioned getting paid solely on results (I haven't gone back and read through everything again). I would expect it to be a flat rate for handling the follow up tasks for them.

    Additionally, you just happened to provide an example that was out of the realm of what I mentioned (simple service businesses) and you picked probably the most red tape heavy industry to use as an example. Yeah, working something like this in the medical field is fraught with peril. I don't think that your average service business has to worry about HIPAA, insurance companies, and a wide variety of platforms.

    I'm not sure that you made it too complicated, but you definitely picked an example that would feel defeating to focus on.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    The reason I used that example is that healthcare is one of the main areas of my expertise. I understand that business - not just the marketing side. I do some marketing things on a small scale now in that area and am in the process of ramping things up. One of the main services I want to maximize is this retention/follow-up thing just because this is a huge pain point for many in this industry.

    I'm going by the old "do what you know" and then build out from there maybe in the future.

    The tracking issues for any services provided on a percentage basis (whole or in part) to this industry is enough to lose your hair (and mind) just thinking about it.

    If you did a flat fee for the followup services, would it be something like $X per 100 emails sent out? How do you show progress without tracking?

    Thanks for any further input.
    Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author umc
    I'm not exactly how much to charge. Again, I was just asking because it is something I definitely see a need for. I'm not quite sure how to execute it though.

    Just thinking, if it were me I'd charge them a flat rate to handle their follow up, basically to be their after-care marketing department. I'd charge x amount monthly to handle contacting whoever needed to be contacted, whether it be following up for reviews from new clients, asking for repeat business, asking for referrals, promoting recurring maintenance programs, etc.

    I could see the service as something that you do yourself, or perhaps some sort of system that you set up that does some measure of follow up automatically. I'm just brainstorming here though. The medical industry adds a few extra layers of challenges, I would think. I don't know much about it. Heck, I'm not sure how much I know about any of this. I'm just a guy that cleans houses and has lots of ideas and dreams.
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  • Profile picture of the author animal44
    You're in the marketing business, not the debt collection business.

    Your job is to bring in customers who are willing to pay for the product/service.

    You're not there to collect debts or manage accounts receivables. Though I'd be concerned about a client who had a high percentage of bad debt...

    If you bring in a customer who buys, then you are entitled to be paid according to the negotiated terms, whatever they are.

    As far as tracking and fees, I'd keep it simple. Of course, I wouldn't work for businesses who are highly regulated and have issues as described... There are plenty of businesses out there who operate on a simple basis with the possibility of simple tracking methods...

    If you must deal with such businesses, say if it's the industry you choose to work in, then work out a simple system, maybe average customer value is x, my fee is a % of x.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mneha
    According to me in offline business, Give your item to unmistakable nearby, provincial and national people for nothing. In the event that they like it, they will utilize it, enlighten other individuals concerning it and possibly underwrite it formally.
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