Another Cold Calling question.

by Zodiax
37 replies
Hello,

If you go a whole month consistenly cold calling about 100 dials for 5 days a week and get no appts. or sales, should you give up?

Does sticking it out even if you are making no money a noble thing that is good for building character?
#calling #cold #question
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

    Hello,

    If you go a whole month consistenly cold calling about 100 dials for 5 days a week and get no appts. or sales, should you give up?

    Does sticking it out even if you are making no money a noble thing that is good for building character?

    It means you are doing at least one major part...wrong.

    Working for a month with no result, doesn't build character, it's nature's way of telling you that you are doing it incorrectly.
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  • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
    Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

    Hello,

    If you go a whole month consistenly cold calling about 100 dials for 5 days a week and get no appts. or sales, should you give up?

    Does sticking it out even if you are making no money a noble thing that is good for building character?
    No, broke and failing is neither noble or smart.

    Not everyone is cut out for sales. The sooner people can
    figure that out for themselves ... the better.
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    Selling Ain't for Sissies
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Have you done this yourself? Or is this a theoretical question?

    If you are doing it, are you following a consistent process? Directions? A script?

    Or are you winging it every time?
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    • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Have you done this yourself? Or is this a theoretical question?

      If you are doing it, are you following a consistent process? Directions? A script?

      Or are you winging it every time?
      This is theoretical.

      It was inspired by one of Grant Cardone's videos.

      He says that anyone who tells you it isn't a 'numbers game' is lying, because it isn't about how much money you make in a particular time-frame but refining and improving your process each call- and developing a certain 'cold calling' memory.

      That's why I started this post. Because I wanted to get your guys' opinion on whether someone should give up after one month, or many months of cold calling failure.
      Signature

      'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
      -Muhammad Ali

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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

        This is theoretical.

        It was inspired by one of Grant Cardone's videos.

        He says that anyone who tells you it isn't a 'numbers game' is lying, because it isn't about how much money you make in a particular time-frame but refining and improving your process each call- and developing a certain 'cold calling' memory.

        That's why I started this post. Because I wanted to get your guys' opinion on whether someone should give up after one month, or many months of cold calling failure.
        I don't know if this helps you or not.

        I have a phone room and we provide training. First a five day
        classroom deal ... product knowledge and script memorization.

        Then the start of "on the phone" training.

        They get six days to make a sale. Well, five days and a half day (sat)
        If they don't get at least one in that time frame ( the amount does not matter )
        then they get fired.

        End of story. No excuses excepted.
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        • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
          Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

          I don't know if this helps you or not.

          I have a phone room and we provide training. First a five day
          classroom deal ... product knowledge and script memorization.

          Then the start of "on the phone" training.

          They get six days to make a sale. Well, five days and a half day (sat)
          If they don't get at least one in that time frame ( the amount does not matter )
          then they get fired.

          End of story. No excuses excepted.
          That's good you want to keep production value up.
          Signature

          'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
          -Muhammad Ali

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          • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
            Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

            That's good you want to keep production value up.
            At that point in the game it has nothing to do with production and
            everything to do with ... teach-ability, accountability, motivation

            and the most important reason ... money. If they don't get a sale
            then I am losing money. From the moment they walk in the doors
            I am losing money on them ... until they get that first sale, then
            generally speaking I break even. Time has proven to me that
            if it doesn't happen in first two week period, it's not going to happen.

            We used to have it at one week classroom training and then two weeks
            on the phone before they needed to make a sale.

            That shit cost me way too much money ... Two weeks all in and
            I break even and you move on ... or you get cut as dead weight

            and if you're thinking ... wow ... what an asshole!

            Yup - You're correct I am, when it comes to business I have to be.
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            • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
              Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post

              At that point in the game it has nothing to do with production and
              everything to do with ... teach-ability, accountability, motivation

              and the most important reason ... money. If they don't get a sale
              then I am losing money. From the moment they walk in the doors
              I am losing money on them ... until they get that first sale, then
              generally speaking I break even. Time has proven to me that
              if it doesn't happen in first two week period, it's not going to happen.

              We used to have it at one week classroom training and then two weeks
              on the phone before they needed to make a sale.

              That shit cost me way too much money ... Two weeks all in and
              I break even and you move on ... or you get cut as dead weight

              and if you're thinking ... wow ... what an asshole!

              Yup - I am.
              Grant cardone gives you one day to close three appointments with no lead list for free . Could you top that

              http://youtu.be/xNQ5LmQG8Eo
              Signature

              'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
              -Muhammad Ali

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              • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

                Grant cardone gives you one day to close three appointments with no lead list for free . Could you top that?
                Top that how? What does" no lead list for free" mean? They have to buy the
                leads from Grant ... to sell them Grants product?

                If that's what that means ... nope I can't.
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              • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
                Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

                I watched about 2 min of that - till the end of grant reading the script.

                That's appointment setting, NOT sales.
                Two completely different worlds.
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        • Profile picture of the author DABK
          But do accept any?

          Originally Posted by kenmichaels View Post


          End of story. No excuses excepted.
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      • Profile picture of the author waymill100
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

        This is theoretical.

        It was inspired by one of Grant Cardone's videos.

        He says that anyone who tells you it isn't a 'numbers game' is lying, because it isn't about how much money you make in a particular time-frame but refining and improving your process each call- and developing a certain 'cold calling' memory.

        That's why I started this post. Because I wanted to get your guys' opinion on whether someone should give up after one month, or many months of cold calling failure.
        Not surprised that it's theoretical. I could tell with 99% certainty immediately.

        The question is meaningless. I'm not even sure if you got Cardone's point right, because what you say contradicts itself.

        Sounds like you got one piece of data and are trying to extrapolate a whole approach out of just that.

        There are so many factors to phone prospecting that "making dials" alone is not enough. Sure, if you don't make any dials you ain't gonna make any sales. But you probably aren't going to "self-refine" your process just by doing it, either. I haven't seen evidence of that in years of training people. Those who come to me with experience have been doing their calls the same way, the same lousy way, for many years.

        You want to learn how to sell by phone?

        Get a consistent sales process. At this point you probably aren't aware that there are several different approaches to selling. Pick one that resonates with you and stick to it.

        Get a coach to give you feedback. That's the fastest way to improve. Make sure the coach's approach matches the consistent process you're following (you'd be surprised how many students don't think about this.)

        Record your calls, listen to them, and compare against your consistent process. Where did you fall down? What do you need to correct to stay on course next time?

        If you are aware, and that's a big IF, you could gain iterative knowledge of your target market by listening. Your prospects will tell you the same pain points over and over again, but only if you are listening for them. I did this in the metal fabrication field, for instance; and, once I learned two pain points, got orders large or small from everyone I called after that point. The business problems quickly became operational rather than revenue-related.

        But most people are too busy trying badly to push product / features & benefits rather than listening.

        I feel that you are coming at this like a fellow student 20 years ago in a math class I was in, taught by a Doctor of Math. The student asked a question. The Doctor of Math screwed up his face, and thought for a long moment. "You don't even know what you're ASKING...!" he erupted. "There are so many assumptions built into your question."

        I really recommend learning more about phone prospecting and phone sales as a distinct subject before you go any further. At this point I don't get the impression that you have much depth about it at all. Not saying this to be insulting...this is how I have to answer your question specifically.

        Get one of Claude's books. Or read this:
        http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...t-selling.html
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

          But you probably aren't going to "self-refine" your process just by doing it, either. I haven't seen evidence of that in years of training people. Those who come to me with experience have been doing their calls the same way, the same lousy way, for many years.

          You want to learn how to sell by phone?

          Get a consistent sales process. At this point you probably aren't aware that there are several different approaches to selling. Pick one that resonates with you and stick to it.

          Of course, I agree. A salesperson (on the phone or in person) that relies solely of their experience to self- correct their approach is almost certainly doomed to failure. It's just almost impossible to luck into an approach and pitch that works.

          You need to learn from someone that knows how to sell. You need to have them listen to your mistakes, and correct them.

          I honestly can't think of a better way to do that than find a very successful company, and learn while working for them. You don't need to stay long. A few month should cut your learning curve substantially.


          Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

          I'm selling for some dude on craigslist who doesn't care if I make sales or not.

          He says he won't get rid of me and I can be flexible. Of course we are splitting commissions.

          I never did well in sales companies. The managers are so obsessed with their overrides that they will terminate you on a selfish whim. Because you didn't force a sale for them.

          To hell with that. I would only work as an independent agent.
          The guy on Craigslist doesn't care if you make a sale, because he has no money invested in you. My guess is that if he gave you a script, it's just one he made up.

          You would benefit from working for someone that cares if you sell or not. And you should want to learn from someone who has made a great living, doing what you are trying to do.


          When I decided to open a retail store, instead of just "winging it", I found the most profitable retailer (in my niche) in the state. I went to work for him for six months, and then opened my own store. It was profitable from day one, and I had money in the bank from learning how to successfully sell at retail.

          Maybe 95% of people that open their own business, fail. I just didn't want to be one of those guys. So, I learned from the best.

          That's my advice to you.
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          • Profile picture of the author Robscom
            Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


            When I decided to open a retail store, instead of just "winging it", I found the most profitable retailer (in my niche) in the state. I went to work for him for six months, and then opened my own store. It was profitable from day one, and I had money in the bank from learning how to successfully sell at retail.
            I know I am probably missing a big part of this story, so I am going to ask:

            Did he know you were going to open your own store when he hired you?
            Signature
            "Do. Or do not. There is no 'try.'" -- Yoda
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by Robscom View Post

              I know I am probably missing a big part of this story, so I am going to ask:

              Did he know you were going to open your own store when he hired you?
              I chose to tell him because it guaranteed that he would let me work with him. My pitch was something like;

              "Pay me anything or nothing at all. I just want to learn the business from you. You're the guy I want to learn from. I'll work in your store for six months, under any arrangement you like. At the end of six months, I leave and open my own store. Agreed?"

              His only stipulation was that it was at least 25 miles away from his store, which it was.

              By the way, that approach will get you hired just about anywhere. Why? Because nobody uses that approach.

              Really, I would have worked for free. As it was,he gave me a generous commission, and I made lots of money during that six months.
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              • Profile picture of the author Robscom
                Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                I chose to tell him because it guaranteed that he would let me work with him. My pitch was something like;

                "Pay me anything or nothing at all. I just want to learn the business from you. You're the guy I want to learn from. I'll work in your store for six months, under any arrangement you like. At the end of six months, I leave and open my own store. Agreed?"

                His only stipulation was that it was at least 25 miles away from his store, which it was.

                By the way, that approach will get you hired just about anywhere. Why? Because nobody uses that approach.

                Really, I would have worked for free. As it was,he gave me a generous commission, and I made lots of money during that six months.
                That is very cool. I had figured it was something like that, but wasn't sure.
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                "Do. Or do not. There is no 'try.'" -- Yoda
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  • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
    I want to earn while I learn.
    Signature

    'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
    -Muhammad Ali

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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

      I want to earn while I learn.
      That's great, but it opens up an entirely new can of worms.

      Your employer is going to either:

      > have a sales process that they insist you follow

      or

      > have no sales process.

      In the first case, you will be forced to conform with a process you have no control over. If this process is a fit with your personality, and is proven to work, then you will be fine.

      But what if this isn't the case? What if the process makes you feel uncomfortable, "slimy"? What if the employer is merely guessing, and hasn't proven that their system works?


      In the second case, all too common, unfortunately, it's a free-for-all. You have a sales department with 10 employees, each with their own--probably poorly defined--sales processes. 10 different sales processes, none really consistent.

      I was on a call earlier this evening discussing a job 20 years ago where I worked for a firm doing things this way. No sales training...pure product knowledge to get the sale. The staff, including me, were order takers. Our "sales manager" did nothing to help us become better salespeople.

      If you were in this situation, would you even know it if I hadn't warned you of it? No, you'd think it was normal. I thought it was normal; I didn't even find out there were different approaches to selling until over a decade into my career. This company was doing fine, by the way; even without a consistent sales process, they made millions every year. But did the salespeople learn anything about selling? Nope. They made their salaries...and if they got anything else out of the experience, I guess that was up to them.

      Learn your own preferences. Pick your employer carefully. I have given you pointers here about what to ask in an interview. Watch for the lies. "Oh, yes, of course we have a sales process." Watch for confusion. "What does that process look like? ...Uhhh..." Look for an employer who has a clear plan and demonstrable success.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
    I'm selling for some dude on craigslist who doesn't care if I make sales or not.

    He says he won't get rid of me and I can be flexible. Of course we are splitting commissions.

    I never did well in sales companies. The managers are so obsessed with their overrides that they will terminate you on a selfish whim. Because you didn't force a sale for them.

    To hell with that. I would only work as an independent agent.
    Signature

    'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
    -Muhammad Ali

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    • Profile picture of the author MrMintyBluez
      Keep this in mind, too, you are likely not the only person calling the prospective client.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mikhail Hunter
    You need to learn how to convince people your product is what they need. Before you go into a call yo should already know exactly who your prospects are and the questions you want to ask them. For ex. This is a script I used when I worked for a furniture company (I would pretend to be extremely busy fluffing pillows, cleaning tables and I would walk right pass the customer without acknowledging him/her, then I would ask "Excuse me can I ask you a question?
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  • Profile picture of the author Mikhail Hunter
    I posted the last comment without finishing.. So I'll continue from here "Excuse me can I ask you a question?" "I noticed you were wearing the latest design Kenneth Cole shoes, really stylish shoes , where'd you get those?" *Thanks, there's actually a new store that opened....." "You have great taste sir" customer responds and you keep that conversation going 2-5 minutes or more discussing nothing about business(furniture) then you transition "So what brings you here today?" ALL customers say this about 99% and if you've worked any sales job you know the phrase "I'm just looking" and sadly most sales people IMMEDIATELY (well the ones that aren't top sellers) say "Ok I'll be over here if you need me". And what tends to happen is that the customer looks around and leaves the store. And honestly I've said it sometimes but then I'll re approach and try to spark a conversation. In some cases I've had to approach people up 6 times before they open up. Anyway moving forward They'd say "I'm just looking" and I would respond "what are you just looking for?". And most would respond "well I've been wanting a sofa for sometime" (or a new dining room table.. etc) Then I would ask "What kind of sofa are you looking for?" or "Are you looking for leather or fabric?" "I'm looking for a leather sofa actually" Then it goes on you ask them as much questions as you need to get a picture of what they are wanting.. Questions about material, color, type reclining or non reclining, tufting, rolled arms or squared arms. This also helps the customer to get a picture for what they want. Also a really good question is to ask them what they have at home. Some may say they are just plain tired of their old sofa, they currently don't have one, the one at home is worn out or has stains, smells bad.. Sometime you can use that information to inflict pain later. I once convinced a car salesman to pay for delivery by telling him the pain of using his truck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mikhail Hunter
    So the previous post was getting long so I'll continue here. After the questioning I would take him to the most expensive sofa that matched his description and sell it with excitement (not too much) I would talk about the benefits and if the product does or have something that's not beneficial to a customer that a feature . DON'T sell features customers don't care about features, If you state a feature tell them how it benefits them specifically. For example "Mr. Johnson, The Bezinga is one of our most exquisite leather sofas 100% liquid and smell resistant, you don't to worry about Zelda (his daughter btw I know this because I started a conversation with him about shoes and I got sp,e information) spilling food or drinks again leather doesn't absorb" This is beneficial to the customer because I asked him alot of questions and he expressed his need to me. The point of questioning was to prevent as much objections as possible but also overcoming them is necessary. The more benefits I tell him the more value it builds, I want to balance that value, ideally want the value to outweigh price. I want the customer to think the merchandise is $5000, when it's really $3,000. Then during the process of the sale I add on for ex. Living room tables, rug, matching chair, lamps, accessories. And add-ons is all about how you present them you could ask or pitch it to them. The more you attempt to add-on the higher the chance they'll say yes, and the higher you build your ticket. "So when would you like to have this delivered?" (pen and paper in hand) you are assuming the sale and closing it, Assumptive Close. or "Should I write it up?" I started typing how customers think from those two closes but it was seriously A LOT and I've written so much already. The close moves the sale forward the customer will say yes and have no objections if you did a good job with finding out there needs and tending to it. Sometimes they will state their objection and you must be ready to handle it immediately. For ex. "Hmmm... what I'm really concerned about is that these kind of sofas are built on a wooden frame ad those tend to break down". "well actually Mr. Johnson unlike traditional sofas we build ours on a titanium alloy that deflects rust and does break down due to moist, heat, or cold." That would be how I'd overcome that objection. Then you ask for the close differently,"Now that we confirm breakage is something that will not happen due to certain weather conditions, the bezinga would really go fantastic with those tables are you sure you don't want to get the tables today?" "I'm sure I'll get them another time the sofa will be good for now." "Ok I'll go ahead and write up." But some customers tend to have multiple objection when they don't want to buy something. There's a "True Objection and a False Objection" You want to get to the true objection and sometimes it can be uncomfortable. So let's say your handling every objection like a boss.. but then the customer says "Zodiax I just don't know... let me think about it do you have a card?" This is the absolute "sale killer" question "do you have a card?" So... what's next, so just give them the card, stop wasting their time move onto the next one but you should do one last attempt at getting the sale without being desperate. And here is the phrase that works well and will boost closing percentage (conversions) "But before you leave(acknowledging they're wish to leave)I know this is a very big investment for you(empathy). May I ask you a question?" (wait for permission) "Is the price more than what you're willing to spend today or is it just not within your budget?" This question can be confusing and I used to phrase it differently but in this example I tried to phrase closet to how the Friedman training said it. But it does matter how you phrase it the questions objective is to determine if it's a price issue or a budget issue. If they think the price is too high then you haven't determined value, they are not going to spend there hard earned money on something that they think they can get cheaper. Budget problem is just now having money. If it's a budget problem then you introduce a payment plan like a financing or layaway program. If it's too high then you bring out the "1 thing you forgot to mention" and elaborate on how it's beneficial or advantageous. Usually you want to determine if it's budget or price issue before they mention leaving and also you want to determine if they "like or love" the product before asking them questions about money. Customers usually don't buy for 3 reasons, they don't like the product, it's too expensive(they don't see it as being value) or it's not within their budget. For example: It's like a high 6 figure earner who drives a Range Rover but complains about how expensive coffee is (bizarre huh?) and some who makes $8,500 per month but only has $1000 of expendable income so they can't afford $3,000. Or they just don't like so it has no value for them (and this could technically be 2 reasons). So I like I mentioned earlier if it's a budget problem introduce finance, if it's price problem build value. But lets say they still don't see the value it then you take them to something cheaper... and you say "this is similar for "less than half the price" Boom! you just made the sale.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
    Jason Kanigan.

    This was promoted to be via a youtube video.

    What do you think of this process. It's from a sales veteran from close.io(presumbly)

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    'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
    -Muhammad Ali

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  • Profile picture of the author Mikhail Hunter
    Here are the cold calling stats from my business partner he does real estate. Leads on cold call convert at 1-3% he's told me as much as 5% before. You follow up each week or month and they convert at 80% around the 3rd or 4th contact and this is cold calling in real estate. The commission here is 3%. But if you are cold calling I recommend to sell something high priced because of the frequency at which you'd get a sale vs the work you put in. minimum $2,000 to $30,000 in commission.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mikhail Hunter
    (last Post) Ok.. this is the last one I'll make for now because I've written a lot and I have to go on the road. What happened to the WF editing features this forum had btw? There were some things I didn't mention, It's hard to cram the full training process in post. I work for a Furniture Store which paid commission only and we were periodically trained by the Friedman team and sometimes different companies like Tempurpedic Sales Managers. And I've learned from watching colleagues, some of who were pros at cold calling. Selling strategy won't convert all prospects BUT it WILL WORK a lot more than not using selling especially with cold calls. Actually you won't have a transaction or an objective met(sale,appointment, contract) if you aren't selling what you have. The examples I've provided in this tread can be used in cold calls. Except for the opening you don't want to start a conversation about shoes, or the shirt they are wearing or about the weather over the phone. And weather is a bad opener in face to face selling btw (but salespeople do this) people will think you are wasting their time, that you're fake or immediately put up their defense because they know you're going to sell them. They already decided to say 'no' before you even told them your product. If I was to do a cold call script I would make the Opening short and to the point without revealing my product, tell them who are and with(even if your an affiliate) and mention the topic for this call and how it relates to them. For ex. I am calling a homeowner that person I'm talking to is a homeowner then I could open a call like this "Hello Mr. Mendez, My name is Hunter and I'm calling with Greener Lawn Pros LLC and The reason I contacted you because HOA may be fine you a ridiculous fee for the current lawn care product you're using. Will this be a good time for us to talk? (unlike the "non business greeting" which works well in retail stores this is a much better opener for a cold call. It's short to the point and attention getting. Do you think Mr Mendez is more likely to listen to the call now? His possible response could be "What I'm really tired of all these damn fees!" You've got his attention now Now if he says he doesn't have much time, then you respond like this. "I understand you value your time, do you have about 3 - 5 minutes?" Most people will be willing to spare 3-5 minutes unless you call them at an really inappropriate time. "I'm going to ask you a few questions real quick ok?" You ask questions to find how about his situation. Now I'm not really keen on selling Lawn Care Services but sometimes you have to wing it or do the research ahead of time so here are some questions I would ask him that are winging it. "Do you, anyone in your household or a company cares for your lawn?" <== Actually that's a very good question and here's why These could be his possible answers "actually no, I've been meaning to do something about it, I'm just too busy all the time" (sad tone) or "Yeah DirtMud Inc. (lol) cares for my lawn, they do an OK job I guess but they're kinda expensive" But you NEVER EVER EVER want to offer a solution immediately. Instead you continue to ask more questions to get an idea of what you're working with, his situation. Then you ask questions about his statements so for ex "You mentioned earlier that you're really business and don't have time for your lawn, how do you feel about that?" or maybe a better question would be to imply some sort of problem like "because you don't have time to take care of your lawn, then would cause weeds to grow?" Your implying that he has weeds has a problem. Here is one of his possible responses "You don't even know the half of it, I have so much weeds that I'm both disgusted and embarrassed of my own yard" Awesome he just revealed a specific need to you making your services relevant and the pain of disgust, pain or pleasure sells! Still Do NOT offer any solution yet!!! you keep implying a problem. But then if you have that much weeds growing (empathy in your voice) then isn't it possible that you're having a pest problem?" "Ohhh My Goodness!! I've noticed that I've had more mosquitoes lately" "Mosquitoes! (surprised voice) with that new virus going around, are you sure you can afford to have them around you?" My son has been stung multiple times and have come down with fevers I've tried everything to get rid of them, but I didn't know weeds attracts mosquitoes" "Like bears to honey, (lol) My hands are getting tired so I'm going to end it here but after you ask some general information questions then you ask questions that imply there may be some sort of problem, if you've had a girlfriend and she talks about her problem then you show concern by implying other problems from her problems it's just like that. By implying problems the customer will reveal his needs or want however you want to define it and his pain. Then You ask questions which are going to be solution to all his problems like "Would it benefit you and your son to have weeds removed as soon as possible.... or what would it mean to you not have to be embarrassed by your lawn anymore" Not only do these questions give the client hope but as the seller this your opportunity to actually have the customer say yes to your services without the customer even realizing it. So first you asked about his situation then you asked depressing questions that implied problems or even ones the customer did not consider and even reveal needs. Then you ask questions that had some ray of hope. Notice the different kind of questioning. Then after the hope questions, state your solutions to him like bullet points, with each point the solution to a problem "....You see Mr. Kemp (I forgot the name I made up) by the time we're done with your lawn, not only will the amount of mosquitoes around you and your son, (God Bless his soul) would have practically vanished. But your lawn in the entire neighborhood is going to be the Epitome of what lawn care should be" Remember that he expressed that he was disgust and embarrassed. At this point if you told him to give you his credit card number, he will not hesitate but instead of charging him $50 for you and your team to come out and look you could offer him a free quote and schedule an appointment this could instead lead to a $10,000 sale. My friend used to say "we jump over dollars for pennies". A free consultation is valuable to customers, especially ones where you give them useful information.( i said free quote before but consultation sounds way better). "When would like to set up an appointment for us come out?" This is an assumptive close, because I assumed that he's agreed to my services and I moved straight to talking about appointments, I've heard someone say on cold calls it's better not to use closing techniques for an encyclopedia of reasons and on the opposite end of the spectrum you can never have enough closing techniques. But if you question the customer properly and actually get to his or her needs and offer a solution to the need. Then I believe using a closing technique is helpful and remember we got him to say yes earlier when we ask the "hope questions" So perhaps the client responds "Umm sometime next week" "Then you respond should I set you up for Wednesday or Thursday". This is another closing technique an alternative close. Then he responds "give me a minute lets do Tuesday" ...Ok and what time would be best for you? He tells you the time then you say thank we look forward to seeing you (I intentionally didn't say business) Or let's say you couldn't schedule an appointment then you schedule a call in the exact same way I mentioned above
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  • Profile picture of the author Mikhail Hunter
    I ended up typing my comments from the "Feed" that's why I didn't use space, In between paragraphs. Is it just me or does anyone else thinks it's a bad idea?
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    • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
      Originally Posted by Mikhail Hunter View Post

      I ended up typing my comments from the "Feed" that's why I didn't use space, In between paragraphs. Is it just me or does anyone else thinks it's a bad idea?
      Try feeding the feed steak
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      'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
      -Muhammad Ali

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  • Profile picture of the author Mikhail Hunter
    I forgot to mention, you can sometimes tend to get anxious on a cold call so you may rush it. Try to keep the customer on the call as long as you can and I mean minimum 15 minutes.

    And going back to the lawn example here. Even if you don't do lawn care say you get an appointment go to a lawn care company and make a contract with them. Businesses outsource to their competitors/colleagues all the time, especially service ones.

    I did that when I sold Furniture.I would approach another sales person and tell them I can't close this customer or I am not getting anywhere and I'll "turnover" the sale we'd negotiate a 50% split. The concept here is 50% of nothing is more money than 100% of nothing.
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  • Profile picture of the author maggyuzon
    There might be something wrong about your approach with your clients. Or they are just really not interested about your offerings. You should have to asses the way you do things and try to make some improvements if there is a need to.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
    I recently saw Claude's video.

    He said to find those 10 to 100 interested people you should ask a simple question to gauge interest.

    "I can save/do xyz for you, are you interested?"

    And move as fast as possible.
    Signature

    'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
    -Muhammad Ali

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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Zodiax View Post

      I recently saw Claude's video.

      He said to find those 10 to 100 interested people you should ask a simple question to gauge interest.

      "I can save/do xyz for you, are you interested?"

      And move as fast as possible.

      To do that, you need a very specific offer that you can make in a short sentence.

      My favorite call was, "I have long distance for 4 cents a minute. Do you want to hear more?"


      You are looking for that small percentage that is receptive to that offer, right now.

      It doesn't work as well with a vague offer like, "If I can save you time and money with your printing, would you like to hear more?"

      If I had a qualified list of business owners in a niche...I wouldn't use it. This approach is most useful if you have a near unlimited list of names, and are just looking for people that are ready to buy now.

      If your service has a strong guarantee, you can use that to cold call, "We guarantee you a page one Google listing in 30 days. Do you want to know more?"

      But I think the method is more useful for offers that nearly everyone qualifies for, and you are just gauging receptivity.
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  • Profile picture of the author avasummerdiaz
    I think it's time for you to try other option. Try other marketing strategy aside from cold calling. Try social media or video marketing on youtube. That could be really helpful.
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    • Profile picture of the author Zodiax
      Originally Posted by avasummerdiaz View Post

      I think it's time for you to try other option. Try other marketing strategy aside from cold calling. Try social media or video marketing on youtube. That could be really helpful.
      Im no wussy
      Signature

      'I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion'
      -Muhammad Ali

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  • Profile picture of the author bestofcuba
    Check this video out on cold calling...thought it was relevant. Grant Cardone has a master cold calling program that is dynamite as well.

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/EBK64vdljZ0
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  • Profile picture of the author SalesGod
    Post your script
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Nguyen
    Cold calling is a skill that is learned over time, you just can't pick up the phone bang out 100 dials 5 days a week and expect something (well you should) but there's more to it.

    All the factors have to be on your side and the only thing you've told is call volume

    You've got the volume of calls factor correct but what about:

    Correct list
    Correct opening
    Correct decision maker
    Correct time to call
    Correct offer
    Correct qualifying
    Correct presentations
    Correct tie down
    Correct close
    Correct mental approach
    Correct tonality
    Correct follow up

    I could go on....

    If the only thing you've got right is the "volume of calls" then you've got a long way to go my friend. Cold calling is not for everyone, takes time, money, dedication to get good at it. Go buy some books, study all you can about cold calling and then comeback and do 100 dials. I promise you'll be in a better place next time round. Spend the money to learn, its only money which you can get back.
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