Question about closing sales

14 replies
How do you maneuver between one failed close to the next close? What goes in between?
#closing #question #sales
  • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
    Originally Posted by StudentOfTheGame View Post

    How do you maneuver between one failed close to the next close? What goes in between?
    Why are you failing?
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by StudentOfTheGame View Post

    How do you maneuver between one failed close to the next close? What goes in between?
    Honestly, I would answer...but this has been talked about over and over again. Just do a search for "Closing sales" or "Answering objections". There is some great material here.
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    • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Honestly, I would answer...but this has been talked about over and over again. Just do a search for "Closing sales" or "Answering objections". There is some great material here.
      Apart from all the searching forums I was reading one of your new books Claude on "Selling Essentials" and I was going to quote a few chapters but really the OP should read the lot.

      Not once but several times

      Things like. . .

      It alerts you when you need improvement. It tells you when something is wrong. It tells you when you are improving. It tells you, if you try a new idea...if this new idea is helping you...or hurting you.
      or the story you told on page 85.

      Those tips. . . "The secrets of the 5 lists" <----GOLD

      Even though I sell every day, at least 5 days a week for the last 20 years or so, well I got a lot out of it. - Thanks Claude.

      WARNING - OP search the forum or check out a few of the quality publications on sales and closing that are out there. . . maybe ask for personal help from a few long term members here.

      Best regards,

      Ozi
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  • Profile picture of the author eccj
    Originally Posted by StudentOfTheGame View Post

    How do you maneuver between one failed close to the next close? What goes in between?
    What do you mean?
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
      Originally Posted by eccj View Post

      What do you mean?
      I think we've "stumped the band" on this one.

      Ron
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by StudentOfTheGame View Post

    How do you maneuver between one failed close to the next close? What goes in between?
    Here's the quick answer.

    Your idea of presenting..closing...answering objection..closing...answering another objection...closing...answering yet another objection...closing....is wrong.

    I did it for years, and it works sometimes. But the idea of answering objection after objection is simply arguing with the buyer. You may wear them out, and they buy as a way of surrendering...but it wears you out as well.

    Don't present, and then close.....Ask question to;
    Discover if they are really a prospect.
    Find out their experience with your product (or category)
    What they like and don't like
    What feature you offer will fit with their wants and needs
    How much they value those features
    How will they benefit (from their point of view)
    Which options you offer will be most comfortable for them to accept
    How do they want to go forward (or not).

    The reason you are now getting objections..is that you're saying things to them that they can object to.

    Nobody ever objects to hearing what they want to hear, or getting what they want to get.

    They only object if they don't want what you offer. The objection is just their polite...politically correct way of saying, "I don't want this".

    And that's why you keep getting objection after objection..no matter what super cool closing strategy you use...no matter what bear trap close you spring on them.

    People will give the same objection to every sales offer they do not want. To some, it's "We can't afford it right now". To others, it's "We have to think about it". But they give the same objection to every salesperson they see. Why? Because it's a reflex, like saying "How are you".

    They aren't really thinking...what they are saying. And that's why answers to objections almost never work. Almost never will you hear, "You know, a minute ago, I didn't want this...but your answer was so brilliant, I want to buy it from you now".

    The only book on answering objection that I've ever read that was worth reading was this one.
    https://www.amazon.com/When-They-Tha...rds=g+e+masana

    No. I didn't write it, and this isn't an affiliate link.
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    • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      The only book on answering objection that I've ever read that was worth reading was this one.
      https://www.amazon.com/When-They-Tha...rds=g+e+masana

      No. I didn't write it, and this isn't an affiliate link.
      That book you mention I haven't read but I was on a webinar when G.E. mentioned such a casual response about this secret "Innocent Commitment"

      It has intrigued me ever since.

      Sometimes people find enlightenment in the most unusual places.

      I'd always used so many combinations of influential things in my presentations and it is rare for someone to find all of the bits and pieces in once place as usually they are a unique blend of things you have seen work or have used that worked for you personally.

      Every time I find a gem that helps with sales or closing I usually do a few things.

      1. Write it down.

      2. Mentally rehearse the situation

      3. Practise incorporating it into a conversation

      4. Test and adapt.

      5. Communicate it to my team.

      6. Measure outcomes and get feedback.

      On another note about books I recently saw Cadel Evans (Aussie Cyclist) new book called "The Art of Cycling"

      Both Claude and G.E really write about the "art" of selling.

      Study that art if you are in the sales game otherwise "on your bike"

      Best regards,

      Ozi
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    • Profile picture of the author John Durham
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Here's the quick answer.

      Your idea of presenting..closing...answering objection..closing...answering another objection...closing...answering yet another objection...closing....is wrong.

      I did it for years, and it works sometimes. But the idea of answering objection after objection is simply arguing with the buyer. You may wear them out, and they buy as a way of surrendering...but it wears you out as well.

      Don't present, and then close.....Ask question to;
      Discover if they are really a prospect.
      Find out their experience with your product (or category)
      What they like and don't like
      What feature you offer will fit with their wants and needs
      How much they value those features
      How will they benefit (from their point of view)
      Which options you offer will be most comfortable for them to accept
      How do they want to go forward (or not).

      The reason you are now getting objections..is that you're saying things to them that they can object to.

      Nobody ever objects to hearing what they want to hear, or getting what they want to get.

      They only object if they don't want what you offer. The objection is just their polite...politically correct way of saying, "I don't want this".

      And that's why you keep getting objection after objection..no matter what super cool closing strategy you use...no matter what bear trap close you spring on them.

      People will give the same objection to every sales offer they do not want. To some, it's "We can't afford it right now". To others, it's "We have to think about it". But they give the same objection to every salesperson they see. Why? Because it's a reflex, like saying "How are you".

      They aren't really thinking...what they are saying. And that's why answers to objections almost never work. Almost never will you hear, "You know, a minute ago, I didn't want this...but your answer was so brilliant, I want to buy it from you now".

      The only book on answering objection that I've ever read that was worth reading was this one.
      https://www.amazon.com/When-They-Tha...rds=g+e+masana

      No. I didn't write it, and this isn't an affiliate link.
      Amazing Claude. In the old school you were taught to wear the prospect out, and in the process you could wear yourself out too... Seriously... I use to come home from some sales days feeling like I was run over by a mack truck... Somewhere in the middle of all of that I started bucking the system a bit and doing it how Claude is saying here.... I got tired of resistance and wrestling... took on this type of demeanor and style of presenting that Claude describes... and broke even more records. Yes rebutting works, and yes wearing someone out works, or pressuring them into a close... but there are better dispositions in selling. This is an awesome post! It is excellent.
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  • Profile picture of the author scottgallagher
    maybe it's the quality of the leads you're approaching.

    here's a mobile app to find the low hanging high quality leads in your area.

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    Father, Entrepreneur, Author, Adranalist
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  • Profile picture of the author Jack Russell
    Great suggestions here, although you may be confused as most would be.

    Here's a good idea for you mate.. check out Ryan Stewman's blog at hardcorecloser.com. Ryan is the real deal and has some great free content there.

    Hope this helps.

    All the best,

    Jack
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    Good stuff. Also check out:

    https://www.amazon.com/High-Probabil.../dp/0963155032

    It's also good to keep in mind circumstances constantly change at companies. New buyer, new owner, new problems, new needs. If you feel they fit your ideal prospect profile, circle back later and try again.
    Signature
    Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
    - Jack Trout
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by joe golfer View Post

      Good stuff. Also check out:

      https://www.amazon.com/High-Probabil.../dp/0963155032

      It's also good to keep in mind circumstances constantly change at companies. New buyer, new owner, new problems, new needs. If you feel they fit your ideal prospect profile, circle back later and try again.
      This may be the best or second best book on cold calling I've ever read. Very transaction oriented, and gets you to the real buyers, by separating them from the non-buyers. It was a refreshing read.

      But their section on closing was disappointing.

      When prospecting, there is a huge advantage to not caring if they are interested. A huge advantage to politely rejecting the non-buyers.

      That same attitude when closing, can kill a deal. Right at the moment someone is deciding to buy or not, their emotions are at their peak, adrenaline is rushing through their veins, Any small detail can be magnified to kill a sale.

      This is true whether it's a business or personal sale.
      Acting in a clinical way ("I don't care if you buy or not") at this time, can be taken the wrong way. Tact is required when asking for large amounts of money.

      I don't mean acting in a subservient way, but the book shows a method that can backfire at the last minute. So, I wouldn't look to the book for closing advice.

      But for Prospecting? About as good as it gets.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
    Spend more time qualifying and you'll spend less time closing.

    That's a fact!

    Ron
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