Sears Store Closing - Appliance Technicians that are Facing Lay Offs or Need a Job

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Hey Guys,

I have been reading the latest on all the Sears & Kmart Stores closing or going out of business.

They latest stories I have seen on the internet is; "The new store closures are on top of 180 Sears and Kmart locations that have already been shuttered this year. The company had previously announced that another 150 stores will close by the third quarter."

I have ran my own successful Residential Appliance Repair Business for over 10 years. After a lot of my customers and other business owners asking me how I got into the appliance business and who trained me.

I began to think that there are a lot of guys that would/could benefit from this business, if they only knew how easy it is to start and could provide for themselves & their families.

Also, would not be in the terrible spot a lot of the Sears Appliance Technicians are now! I would love to help these guys out if at all possible.

Anyway, my questions is. What would be the best way to contact the appliance technicians that have lost their jobs or facing lay offs (just read an appliance technicians post in Michigan where he & 17 other technicians lost their jobs in June 2017).

So many of these guys don't have a clue that they would make so much more working for themselves and A LOT less hours than what I have heard that Sears was having them work 12 to 15 hour days with FORCED overtime.

Any helpful adivce you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Chris
#appliance online training #appliance repair #appliance repair schools #online appliance courses #working for sears
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    So many of these guys don't have a clue that they would make so much more working for themselves and A LOT less hours than what I have heard that Sears was having them work 12 to 15 hour days with FORCED overtime.
    I had a cousin who worked for Sears his entire working career - he could fix anything and I never understood why he didn't start his own repair business. He said it was 'too risky' and his job was a 'sure thing'. I expect many losing those retail jobs now believe the same as he did.

    I think you have an excellent idea - in fact, you might consider creating a product (an ebook/how to manual) to sell on Amazon Kindle, for example. Or run local workshop or training sessions if the layoffs are in your area.

    A service business means knowing how to perform the service AND how to run a business. That second part is where many of these laid off workers will need help.

    One consideration - more people are buying major appliances online now than ever before. I've done it myself and finding qualified people to install gas and electric appliances is not easy when you don't buy from the offline 'sales and service' stores.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
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    Originally Posted by StokesM View Post

    Hey Guys,

    I have been reading the latest on all the Sears & Kmart Stores closing or going out of business.

    They latest stories I have seen on the internet is; "The new store closures are on top of 180 Sears and Kmart locations that have already been shuttered this year. The company had previously announced that another 150 stores will close by the third quarter."

    I have ran my own successful Residential Appliance Repair Business for over 10 years. After a lot of my customers and other business owners asking me how I got into the appliance business and who trained me.

    I began to think that there are a lot of guys that would/could benefit from this business, if they only knew how easy it is to start and could provide for themselves & their families.

    Also, would not be in the terrible spot a lot of the Sears Appliance Technicians are now! I would love to help these guys out if at all possible.

    Anyway, my questions is. What would be the best way to contact the appliance technicians that have lost their jobs or facing lay offs (just read an appliance technicians post in Michigan where he & 17 other technicians lost their jobs in June 2017).

    So many of these guys don't have a clue that they would make so much more working for themselves and A LOT less hours than what I have heard that Sears was having them work 12 to 15 hour days with FORCED overtime.

    Any helpful adivce you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
    Chris


    This really is an awesome idea. You've found a desperate niche and know how to help them turn the table and use their skills in a better way. Good job.

    The first thing most of those unemployed people will do is hit their local unemployment office. The second thing they'll do is start mandatory job searching required by the unemployment office.

    You could advertise different ways.
    • Local paper flyers
    • Local Craigslist
    • Targeted facebook advertising
    • Linkedin research

    Setup some kind of referral bounty because each Sears location will have a dozen service techs. So when you find one service tech you've basically gained access to a dozen other techs (example). I'm sure all those local techs stay in contact via cell phones.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    This is not something that "suddenly" happened. It's been going on for at least the last ten years in the retail industry - beginning with cutting employees' hours, layoffs, salary freezes etc among many of the major retail stores including Kmart, Walmart, Target, JC Penney, Macy's ... etc.

    This trend will continue for years to come, as the retail landscape shifts increasingly to e-commerce. The stores that survive will most likely restructure their business model similar to Amazon.

    I have no idea what to do specifically for the appliance technicians, but there is a whole lot of talent in sales and management for example that is transferable to small business.

    What I have done for many years is run "business opportunity" ads in the classified section of metro area newspapers along with full-page "advertorials" and articles in special interest magazines. I have found this to be more effective than any other method including online advertising for this particular demographic.
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  • Profile picture of the author StokesM
    Thanks to those of you that have taken the time to reply to this post. I really appreciate it. You have given me some very good ideas on how to get the word out to the appliance repair technicians that need work.

    Kay King;

    I think you have an excellent idea - in fact, you might consider creating a product (an ebook/how to manual) to sell on Amazon Kindle, for example. Or run local workshop or training sessions if the layoffs are in your area.

    A service business means knowing how to perform the service AND how to run a business. That second part is where many of these laid off workers will need help.

    I do have my own product Appliance Training Course that I created a little over a year ago to help those that are in this same predicament. I don't want to break in WF rules, but for those that are interested you can check out my link to my website.

    Yukon;

    Awesome idea about contacting some of the Sears Techs (never would have thought of that resource). Also, thanks for the advertising tips. I will start to implement them shortly.

    Myob,

    I will start to advertise for "Business Oportunity".

    Thanks Again
    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
    On paper, making people redundant is an easy financial decision to keep a company alive.

    In reality many employers are loathe to make people who have worked for them, sometimes for decades, unemployed.

    To make it more palatable, and as an internal PR exercise for those employees not affected by redundancy, companies try and soften the blow.

    Large companies especially will financially cost out redundancy to include not just renumeration but funding of programmes to help those affected

    Usually a well respected external recruitment agency who will help with CV writing, interview techniques and access their databases of jobs.

    Additionally there may be Financial Advisers if the redundancy packages are generous and also 'How to start a small business' type of workshops.

    I am not saying 100% this happens in the US or that these two companies do this as I am in the UK

    So, if what I have written is not out of the norm for large companies in the US who have funds I would be approaching the HR depts at the local level and the HR Director at a national level to offer my services on how I could help them look good.

    Dan

    PS: The military have what are called Resettlement programmes for when soldiers leave. Contact your local base or ask anyone you know still in or just left who the resettlement officer is. (Might not be called resettlement in US but you get the idea)
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  • Profile picture of the author theleadsguy
    Anyway, my questions is. What would be the best way to contact the appliance technicians that have lost their jobs or facing lay offs?
    You can search for their resumes on Indeed (you'll need to sign up for a Free account to do this).

    1. Go to Indeed.com and click "Find Resumes" at the top.
    2. Click on Advanced Search.
    3. Under "Company of latest job"- type in "Sears or Kmart"
    4. Under "Title of last job" type in- "Appliance Technician"
    5. You can email them directly from Indeed.

    Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
    There are a couple of separate issues here.

    Your main question was how do I reach them.

    Simple. Run ads for "experienced appliance repair technicians wanted".
    You can do it on classified, Facebook etc...
    You will now have them coming to you...

    Next issue is what you do with them of course and I assume you already have some sort of plan.

    I visited your site and see you sell a course to train techs and get them working.
    In this case you can eliminate the training part
    but
    be warned that they will be no closer to converting than folks that never repaired an appliance.
    In fact believe it or not it may be harder to get these guys to work for themselves than someone that never repaired an appliance because they obviously have had the choice to switch over for a long time but their belief structure is rather ingrained.

    I also think you will find many that dabbled at being self employed and their crappy results have re-enforced their belief that its too hard to get clients etc...

    Personally here is what I would do.
    Put out ads for qualified techs.
    Put them through a sales funnel that makes them qualify themselves.
    If they are qualified enough sell them the picks and shovels of the part of the business they have obviously never wanted to do or feel they can't do. In other words just because it is easy for you to get the phone ringing does not mean they will EVER figure it out.

    Lots of ways you could do this like sell them actual service calls on a per call fee and the value add for them to come on board with you is you give them a business in a box that they need to put in place so they can get/service those calls. Nothing to do with repair skills, all about business setup...

    I have run multi million dollar national campaigns to generate calls for locksmiths, appliance repair, garage door repair etc... Used to do this on monthly fee but now I have moved my business to being paid per call/long form submit (for some niches) so I can tell you that it works... and removes most objections since all they are paying for is the end result...

    regards,

    Peter
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    • Profile picture of the author StokesM
      Peter,

      Thanks for the taking the time to offer some very valuable advice. You have given some valuable points that I will consider.

      You are spot on here, "In fact believe it or not it may be harder to get these guys to work for themselves than someone that never repaired an appliance because they obviously have had the choice to switch over for a long time but their belief structure is rather ingrained."

      I am finding that out as I receive calls & emails on a regular basis with these exact objections. It is amazing to me that people can work for a company and do ALL THE WORK! Yet, don't think they can make it on their own or start a small business even part-time (mind boggling).

      Anyway, I will take a look at running some ads for experienced & qualified appliance tech.

      Thanks Again
      Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    Simple. Run ads for "experienced appliance repair technicians wanted".
    Mainstream classified ad companies and newspapers generally will not allow you to use a headline implying that you have a job opening and then pitch those who respond with a business opportunity or a training program. They consider that false advertising - and with good justification.

    So while this approach may sound feasible, it may need to be tweaked.

    Marcia Yudkin
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
      Originally Posted by marciayudkin View Post

      Mainstream classified ad companies and newspapers generally will not allow you to use a headline implying that you have a job opening and then pitch those who respond with a business opportunity or a training program. They consider that false advertising - and with good justification.

      So while this approach may sound feasible, it may need to be tweaked.

      Marcia Yudkin
      It absolutely needs to be tweaked lol
      I didn't go into any real detail on how to do it.
      Just requires a little creativity.

      I am also NOT recommending false advertising and I NEVER engage with anyone without sticking to the spirit of mutual value.

      Lets go real world example.
      The guy is laid off and scared with no work.

      i can target on Facebook with things like "experienced appliance tech and need work? contact me I can get you doing service calls next week" or same on craigslist or classifieds... or even get others to tag someone in that they know needs work on FB...

      I would NOT be saying anything that was not true.

      In fact I have helped folks in other niches like this (locksmith).

      After vetting I simply setup up an adwords campaign and a few booked jobs in their town.
      already had the call centre and operators so was no big deal.
      In this case it was to hire them on as contractors but it can be used in other ways.

      Once they know you are for real you can sell them whatever you want.
      Booked appointments, calls, or DIY systems...
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