Offline Marketing to local businesses?

10 replies
What are some good ways to reach out to other businesses who specifically state "no solicitors"?

Unfortunately, I don't have much of a budget. I can create business cards, etc. Mailings can be expensive. I'm hoping to offer a service to hair salons and pet grooming places, with respect to sharpening and maintaining their scissors and electric trimmers.
#businesses #local #marketing #offline
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  • Profile picture of the author animal44
    I've heard you can "Reach Way More People on Twitter"...

    Trying to reach people who have "no soliciting" signs is an uphill battle. Are you sure you really want to do that?

    Try this instead...

    Create a report talking about specific pain points within the industry.

    Find people who are already servicing the industry (the host) - for hairdressers it might be those who sell shampoo, those who service their chairs, their trade association.

    Offer the report as a free giveaway for their customers. Offer a customised intro page for the host.

    Also include some form of offer or call to action for your business. e.g. "sign up to our email list for more hints and tips like this". or "Here's a special offer only for customers of [the host]".

    As an example of compelling headings, take a look at Ewan's web developer ad.
    https://www.warriorforum.com/offline...ml#post6713179
    Just turn these headings into a report rather than an Ad.

    Another example in the same thread for Junk Car Buyers
    https://www.warriorforum.com/offline...ml#post6781135

    You can, of course, give away the same report on your own website with your own introduction...

    And create new reports regularly and distribute through the same channels. Not everyone is ready to buy when they receive your report...

    And you might even get some of the "no soliciting" prospects calling you...
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
    Originally Posted by tritrain View Post

    What are some good ways to reach out to other businesses who specifically state "no solicitors"?

    Unfortunately, I don't have much of a budget. I can create business cards, etc. Mailings can be expensive. I'm hoping to offer a service to hair salons and pet grooming places, with respect to sharpening and maintaining their scissors and electric trimmers.
    Scissor sharpening can be a great little moneymaker.

    A couple of years ago, I posted an article here about a guy who was pulling down somewhere around $1,000 per day, driving from from business to business in his van, doing on-site sharpening. You may be able to find it using the search tool.

    What you need to do is get out and meet your prospects.

    You want to talk to those who are already buying sharpening services.

    They will be interested in what you have to say and offer.

    Thus, ignore the "no solicitor" signs. They aren't meant for you.

    The easiest, fastest and best way to get business is to go out and meet them.

    Best of Luck!

    Ron
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
      Keep in mind that there is a constant turnover of staff at hair salons and some barber shops.
      Make sure you leave enough contact info/flyers, for the each staff member when you visit.

      Also, check the new business registrations for your area. Mine are listed in the legal news, which I just reviewed. Shows three new hair salons have opened in my area, recently.

      They'd be first on my hit list.

      In my sales career, I've always welcomed "no soliciting" signs. They keep timid salespeople away which means there is always more opportunity waiting there for me. From my experience, they are some of the easiest sales, too.

      Ron
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by Ron Lafuddy View Post

        In my sales career, I've always welcomed "no soliciting" signs. They keep timid salespeople away which means there is always more opportunity waiting there for me. From my experience, they are some of the easiest sales, too.
        This. ^^

        If you just walk in with a bit of a swag, a touch of arrogance, or commanding tone, and a short engaging intro (under 30 seconds), it is unlikely you will even be challenged for "overlooking" the no soliciting signs.

        For nearly four years I sold high end Amazon products offline to large businesses (heavy industry, telecommunications providers, automotive, hotels, hospitals, etc) . Most of them had quite visible "No Soliciting" signs.
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        • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
          Consider using a one page pamphlet. Here is a good guide. Considering these guys have published over 180 Million pamphlets. It might be a good give away to get sharpening customers. Include a coupon and time limited offer.

          http://www.journeyworks.com/images/anatomy.pdf

          I have no affiliation with Journey Works, but I do like their biz model, selling TONS to Gov'ts and Not for Profit organizations, they are a great HOTSHEET publisher.

          GordonJ
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by tritrain View Post

    What are some good ways to reach out to other businesses who specifically state "no solicitors"?

    Unfortunately, I don't have much of a budget. I can create business cards, etc. Mailings can be expensive. I'm hoping to offer a service to hair salons and pet grooming places, with respect to sharpening and maintaining their scissors and electric trimmers.
    With a service such as that... forget the signs and step right in and introduce yourself.
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  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ


    This guide was written in 1912. I have a 1957 copy. It tells how to sharpen everything, from kitchen knives, shears, sickle and even machetes. It is illustrated showing which tool to use.

    "A cutting tool is no better than it's edge." So their logo goes. A simple infographic, perhaps a large postcard, 16 pt. maybe even 9x 12 showing some of the tools you sharpen, with a coupon for a buy one get one free or some such offer.

    Have a leave behind, with a call to action, and ignore the signs, go in and give them a FREE DEMO.

    My father was a barber, and all 3 guys in the shop had their tools sharpened monthly, the guy had a route, and even in the mid 60's the sharpener guy supported his family of 5 on his little back room business.

    GordonJ

    PS. They too had a NO SOLICITORS sign in the window, I remember thinking, "you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a salesman in this place" as I was shining shoes. I guess real salesman just play dumb, one guy said; OH, I thought that meant no LAWYERS. Good laugh, and then he sold them soap. I remember that guy, his name was Joe Victor.

    He also sold vitamins too.


    Originally Posted by tritrain View Post

    What are some good ways to reach out to other businesses who specifically state "no solicitors"?

    Unfortunately, I don't have much of a budget. I can create business cards, etc. Mailings can be expensive. I'm hoping to offer a service to hair salons and pet grooming places, with respect to sharpening and maintaining their scissors and electric trimmers.
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    On top of the good answers above mine, consider not being a solicitor. I am talking about this: Don't go asking them for something, go offer them something they want.

    When you're not bugging me, you're other things, good things, depending on what you do. So, have a short and clear offer and find a way (as mentioned above) of sorting them into likely to be interested and only deal with the likely to be interested ones.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jefay
    I like offline marketing a lot. It is a great old-school method. As for me, I use different promotional items and printed products for this purpose. My favourite stuff are those lapel pins from https://www.pinsource.com/hard_enamel I use them as free gifts and my customers really like those
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  • Profile picture of the author nalbandian1
    Trade Shows can help you much better to get B2B Customers. But, as you said you don't have too much budget then you should get a roll up a banner stand and place it somewhere in a crowdy place where your business message gets noticed by others.
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