Life Insurance Legend Ben Feldman On Tape For Free.

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Guys...

I just came upon this on Youtube. This isn't my channel, or my video. It's four videos that are audio only of an interview Ben Fedman did. I bought the cassettes (remember those?) maybe 35 years ago, but they are long gone.

There is no advertising, and the guy that uploaded this material isn't asking for anything. If fact, this may eventually be taken down...because it's copyrighted material.

Ben Feldman...the last few years of his life...made a million dollars a year just in renewal commissions...from the policies he sold throughout his life. He sold more life insurance personally than the bottom two thirds of all life insurance companies at the time.

He was a small nebbish quiet spoken man that limped and talked with a slight lisp...

But my God! Could he sell. My first real contact with greatness.

Enjoy.
#ben #feldman #free #insurance #legend #life #tape
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  • Cheers Claude, (I remember when you posted your BF audio a few months ago - it reminded me to re - read the books).

    The best thing...

    Forget all about the aggressive foot in the door - "box you into a corner till you buy or die" egotistical sales men or women, desperately trying to be "alpha" (usually with a massive streak of arrogance and absolutely no empathy) with huge $ signs in their eyes....

    You can make 100,000 x (plus) more with far, far less hassle using the Feldman techniques.

    Doesn't matter one iota if you look frail, are a bit shy have a lisp or whatever...

    You can still have incredible success.


    Steve


    P.S. The "tactics" work for any product or service it doesn't have to be life insurance.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      Cheers Claude, (I remember when you posted your BF audio a few months ago - it reminded me to re - read the books).

      The best thing...

      Forget all about the aggressive foot in the door - "box you into a corner till you buy or die" egotistical sales men or women, desperately trying to be "alpha" (usually with a massive streak of arrogance and absolutely no empathy) with huge $ signs in their eyes....

      You can make 100,000 x (plus) more with far, far less hassle using the Feldman techniques.

      Doesn't matter one iota if you look frail, are a bit shy have a lisp or whatever...

      You can still have incredible success.


      Steve


      P.S. The "tactics" work for any product or service it doesn't have to be life insurance.
      Steve;
      It reminds me of the best furniture salesman I ever met. It was at a Levin's Furniture store in Canton Ohio.

      It was in 2008 when nobody was buying furniture. My wife and I walked in to the store...there were maybe ten salespeople, milling around, talking to each other.

      We asked to see the best salesperson. The woman at the counter said that it was Dan Stevens, and he was with the only other customer in the store. I asked if he was the best salesman there. She said "Honey, he's the best salesman in the world". I had to talk to Dan.

      We went in to buy an end table. Ours needed replaced. i figured we would spend about $300. We walked out after spending about $30,000 on new furniture.

      Dan was about 60 years old, walked with a limp, was soft spoken...and held me spellbound for about 2 hours. After we left the store, I took notes in the car for about 15 minutes. My wife is a saint for putting up with my obsession.

      No hard sell, no "alpha male" nonsense...just excellence in selling. Here's a short video where I talk about it.

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  • I remember ages ago Dan Kennedy saying at one of his seminars...

    (This might be pushing it a bit but...)

    The best most empathetic sales people tend to look like "Columbo" forget about slick - talk to the guy in a crumbled suit and worn out shoes (make sure they are the wise sales pro's who really care about their customers...not downtrodden "couldn't bother lessers").

    Not quite sure what the sales women should look like (lol).

    The point being forget about salespeople who come across as only caring about themselves and not you and only want to sell stuff they want you to buy.

    Talk to the people who only want to sell what you want to buy.

    One proviso...

    It's perfectly Ok if they make the correct suggestions in what is best for you.

    And can reassure and prove you have made the right decision.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author animal44
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      The best most empathetic sales people tend to be like "Columbo" forget about slick - talk to the guy in a crumbled suit and worn out shoes (I know it might seem they are a downtrodden and not any good)
      Ha! That almost describes me...
      Jeans and tee shirt all the way... mumbler extraordinaire... Forgetful... Muffs his lines...

      Nothing like much of the advice on this forum...
      Signature

      People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
      What I do for a living

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  • Luckily I look like the village idiot if I wear brightly coloured clothes (and tying a tie takes me about 1 hour 57 minutes and looks like a hangman's noose so my vast collection of 3 have been unused in the wardrobe for about 25 years).

    Shopping is easy, black, white or grey.

    Fortunately the official copywriters "uniform" is jeans a white T shirt and trainers (you know what I don't know what the american word is for "trainers" - although I sometimes break the rules and wear a pair of black Timberland boots).

    For corporate clients it's acceptable to wear a blazer (also suitable if its a bit breezy).


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      Luckily I look like the village idiot if I wear brightly coloured clothes (and tying a tie takes me about 1 hour 57 minutes and looks like a hangman's noose so my vast collection of 3 have been unused in the wardrobe for about 25 years).

      Shopping is easy, black, white or grey.

      Fortunately the official copywriters "uniform" is jeans a white T shirt and trainers (you know what I don't know what the american word is for "trainers" - although I sometimes break the rules and wear a pair of black Timberland boots).

      For corporate clients it's acceptable to wear a blazer (also suitable if its a bit breezy).


      Steve
      When I sold life insurance, I wore a suit, because everyone in he business wore a suit. And I was young and dumb...and thought it would make me look more substantial.

      When I had an office and had salespeople working for me, I wore a white dress shirt and black slacks...and black shiny steel toed shoes. In fact, my wardrobe consisted of about a dozen identical shirts, and a dozen pairs of identical slacks.

      I looked like a Mormon.

      But all the years I sold by myself in people's homes, it was jeans and whatever was comfortable. Even though it was public contact work, my conduct said more than anything I wore.
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  • You know what - if we mumble, stutter, forget the lines, are a bit introverted, your nerves are jangling and if anything or everything else goes array...

    It doesn't have to matter.

    Providing...

    The client gets the impression that despite all this - they can intrinsically tell that we DO know what we are talking about.

    How would they know this?

    Because we make sure we actually do (and a 6th sense tells them this).

    And remember it things do go a bit wonky - we just "admit it" rather than try and hide it.

    Then take a breath - and make everything clear.

    And suddenly we are "real" which is so much better better than trying to blag it.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      You know what - if we mumble, stutter, forget the lines, are a bit introverted, your nerves are jangling and if anything or everything else goes array...

      It doesn't have to matter.

      Providing...

      The client gets the impression that despite all this - they can intrinsically tell that we DO know what we are talking about.

      How would they know this?

      Because we make sure we actually do (and a 6th sense tells them this).

      And remember it things do go a bit wonky - we just "admit it" rather than try and hide it.

      Then take a breath - and make everything clear.

      And suddenly we are "real" which is so much better better than trying to blag it.


      Steve
      You know a lot more than you think you do.

      One of the biggest mistakes I made when I first started training salespeople was showing them a presentation when I was in full selling mode.The first time I did it, a mentor was siting in the room. At the end of the training, I was sure everyone would come back the next day, eager to sell this product they were all so excited about.

      My mentor told me "None of them are coming back. Everyone that was here is now thinking "I could never do what he does"". He was right, none of them came back...out of about 40 people. None.

      This was 30 years ago or so. I learned to mute the "salesmanship". Like a new actor that ruins every scene because he is "acting". And the old pros are subtle. Every expression says more than the line they speak.

      Rather than a performance (although with me it's still a performance), I learned to make it a conversation...between two people with the same goal.

      Ben Feldman? My furniture salesman? Me? They (we) have learned how to be conversational, low key, soft spoken, and we don't hide our flaws.

      But beneath it all, we know what works, and what doesn't. And no matter how much we sound like we just aren't interested in selling, but just want to talk...underneath it all is a drive to get the sale.

      I like to think of it as the customer and I are walking in a field, and the grade is only a few degrees sloping toward one point...the sale. And even if we wander around the field, slowly, we get closer to the center....because gravity and the grading of the ground...pulls us in.

      And at the end of my active selling life, in a retail store...I hear this an average of two times a day... "You know, we didn't come in here expecting to buy a vacuum cleaner".

      The best selling, like the best acting...is invisible.
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  • Sadly I'll never be a sales trainer (mind you it would only take me about 30 seconds " Do your best, if they don't want to buy - say thanks for the time, and move on to someone who does).

    But my goodness...

    I could write a book on everything that can go wrong...when you are selling lol.

    Anyway a good friend of mine is an ace copywriter here in the UK.

    She is an introvert and is genuinely scared to death about meeting clients and doing presentations.

    In a flash of inspiration I told her to always start the conversation with clients by saying...

    "Your business is very important to me - so please forgive me if I seem a bit nervous"

    Virtually every client "understood" (even the hard nosed clients at least gave her a chance).

    And who would want to create epic masterpieces for those that didn't?

    2 things happened...

    She felt a bit happier not trying to "hide" her fear.

    And her "pitches" were much better.

    She still gets a little "fraught" and it would be fair to say she doesn't exactly relish doing presentations.

    But she has turned her disadvantage into her advantage.

    It's almost a USP.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      She is an introvert and is genuinely scared to death about meeting clients and doing presentations.

      In a flash of inspiration I told her to always start the conversation with clients by saying...

      "Your business is very important to me - so please forgive me if I seem a bit nervous"

      Virtually every client "understood" (even the hard nosed clients at least gave her a chance).

      And who would want to create epic masterpieces for those that didn't?

      2 things happened...

      She felt a bit happier not trying to "hide" her fear.

      And her "pitches" were much better.

      She still gets a little "fraught" and it would be fair to say she doesn't exactly relish doing presentations.

      But she has turned her disadvantage into her advantage.

      It's almost a USP.


      Steve
      Smart. Yes, always work with what you have....Don't "Fake it till you make it". Everything about you is an asset, if used well..this is important enough for me to start another thread, I think. Thanks for the inspiration.
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