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I think if you're a salesperson, indeed bigger = better because it doesn't take much more time to sell the bigger deal then the small one, but is it always true?



For all price points, I can think of successful companies.



One extreme is Walmart, the other would be high tech vendors to the US government. E.g. SpaceX and Palantir.



Curious: what was your trajectory,where is your exit goal and why?
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  • Profile picture of the author OptedIn
    Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

    I think if you're a salesperson, indeed bigger = better because it doesn't take much more time to sell the bigger deal then the small one,
    It may not take much more time, which, of course, is a subjective evaluation, but it most certainly takes a different presentation and skillset to deliver it, effectively.

    but is it always true?
    Not much in life is always true. There are exceptions to everything, except death being the inevitable, final outcome.

    For all price points, I can think of successful companies.
    Uh, yeah. Like cars from Rolls Royce and toilet paper from Kimberly Clark.

    One extreme is Walmart, the other would be high tech vendors to the US government. E.g. SpaceX and Palantir.
    I'm confused. What's your point other than there are many millions of products in the world that range in price from almost nothing to extremely exorbitant?

    Curious: what was your trajectory, where is your exit goal and why?
    My trajectory has always been onward and upward, my exit from mainstream commerce has been achieved because I'm old and have very little interest in working at anything other than supporting a few clients that depend on me and refuse to believe that I can find someone as, or more competent than myself to service their needs. Their refusal to allow me to just ride off into the sunset is costing them, dearly and at some level, easing my pain of continuing to have to work. I didn't care when the weather was cold. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

    I think if you're a salesperson, indeed bigger = better because it doesn't take much more time to sell the bigger deal then the small one, but is it always true?

    For all price points, I can think of successful companies.

    One extreme is Walmart, the other would be high tech vendors to the US government. E.g. SpaceX and Palantir.

    Curious: what was your trajectory,where is your exit goal and why?


    There's no sales people in Walmart stores and the self presentation is next to a bag of Cheetos, underwear and lawnmowers. The Walmart transaction is a debit/credit card and a paper receipt.

    How many people on this earth have access to the decision maker at SpaceX?

    I bet an indvidual could have the best invention in the world and find it extremely difficult/impossible to even get in the door to make a presentation for SpaceX or NASA.

    On the other hand, Walmart has it's front doors open 24/7 begging people to walk in the store.

    I have no idea where this is going.
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

    I think if you're a salesperson, indeed bigger = better because it doesn't take much more time to sell the bigger deal then the small one, but is it always true?
    the idea of diminishing return comes into play with this... I can set up a funnel today and start selling a $5.00 something.. a $100 something and probably by the end of the day have some amount of results. You get into that $1000 something and things get a bit more complicated and setting up the funnel takes a bit longer. dialing it in takes a bit more tweeking. Your target is usually a lot more narrow, so there is less traffic across the offer. So in volume you will sell less.

    It then becomes a matter of finding the point of diminishing return. As an example I have a $10 something I can sell for $100 and a $100 something I can sell for $1000. All things being equal.. within a 10 to 1 ratio. Can you sell 12 of the $100 items in the same time you can sell 1 $1000 item. It obviosly depends.. but I would say in most cases it is easier and more cost efficient to sell the lesser item.

    A real life example. I sell TV's on the net. I sell $300 tv's I sell $1000 TV's ( and everything in the middle ) and I sell $10K+ monster monitors. I for the most part recieve the same amount of commision per dollar for each unit. 8% for a cheap TV, and 10% for the expensive ones. At the end of the day, I make more on the cheap ones than I do the big ones. At the end of the month it averages out to a 62 to 1 ratio on average.

    In terms of actual cash... its about 2.5 to 1 in favor of the low end market. I actually spend far less time with the low end funnels than I do the high end one. Getting into some of the bigger sales and there are phone calls and setting up onsite stuff and yada yada in some cases I really wonder why bother. The why bother part is part of the deal tho I have.. sell the big stuff, and they allow me to sell the smaller stuff
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    Originally Posted by Optedin

    I'm confused. What's your point other than there are many millions of products in the world that range in price from almost nothing to extremely exorbitant?
    Yeah I could have worded it way better. I`m less trying to promote a point of view then bounce ideas off people.

    I went back to school to study in math. I'm at the point where I have to start specializing and I`m not entirely sure which way to go.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

    I think if you're a salesperson, indeed bigger = better because it doesn't take much more time to sell the bigger deal then the small one, but is it always true?

    When you say "sell"....I'm going to take it that you mean actually talking to someone.

    Who are you most comfortable talking to? Who do you want to avoid?

    Are you most comfortable talking to corporate buyers? CEOs? Small business owners? Individual consumers?

    Would it feel strange to you to sell something at a $10,000 price point? A $100,000 price point?

    Are you a "relationship" kind of guy...or a "transactional" kind of guy?

    Do you feel more comfortable working in a company, or running your own show?
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    • Profile picture of the author socialentry
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      When you say "sell"....I'm going to take it that you mean actually talking to someone.

      Who are you most comfortable talking to?


      Nerds in general. Math people. Computer scientists. Engineers. Graduate students. Fans of japanese anime. The likes.



      On sales calls, I liked talking with doctors and dentists. They were in general sympathetic and well spoken.



      Who do you want to avoid?


      In the short term, not a lot of people beside criminals.



      In the long term, there's just too many to list.In general, I avoid extroverts and underachievers.




      Are you most comfortable talking to corporate buyers? CEOs? Small business owners? Individual consumers?

      SMB owners and CEOs but by a relatively small margin. They're all people at the end of the day so it's a bit the same to me.




      It's just I don't like long sales cycle.




      Would it feel strange to you to sell something at a $10,000 price point? A $100,000 price point?
      No.


      For myself, I think it has less to do with the price point then whether or not I believe in the product. With a bigger price point, I think it will lessen some of the strangeness as the product is higher end.



      Whenever I felt strange, it was never because of the price but because the script was cringe-worthy (e.g. it spoke only in generalities).




      Are you a "relationship" kind of guy...or a "transactional" kind of guy?

      I prefer transactional.


      The whole "courtship" approach to sales seems wholly artificial.



      Do you feel more comfortable working in a company, or running your own show?
      In terms of short term comfort, the former is better, but in the long run, the latter is much better.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    Is it always true? Hmmm. Depends on where the Buyer's at mentally. If I can move you from a potential $5,000 sale you're considering to a $10,000 sale, that may be a $5,000 move in your mind. Getting someone from 0 to $10,000 is a $10,000 move.

    My exit goal, if I understand you correctly, is that they buy something rather than not at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author eccj
    Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

    I think if you're a salesperson, indeed bigger = better because it doesn't take much more time to sell the bigger deal then the small one, but is it always true?



    For all price points, I can think of successful companies.



    One extreme is Walmart, the other would be high tech vendors to the US government. E.g. SpaceX and Palantir.



    Curious: what was your trajectory,where is your exit goal and why?
    A salesman isn't a company.

    The biggest companies sell to the biggest, broadest markets. High paid salesmen sell big deals.

    For a salesman bigger is almost always better.
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  • Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

    I think if you're a salesperson, indeed bigger = better because it doesn't take much more time to sell the bigger deal then the small one, but is it always true?



    For all price points, I can think of successful companies.



    One extreme is Walmart, the other would be high tech vendors to the US government. E.g. SpaceX and Palantir.



    Curious: what was your trajectory,where is your exit goal and why?
    It's one of those sayings that people throw around but have not actually tested.

    There is a world of difference between selling a $100 web site say than a $5m project.

    People say it takes the same effort....non-sense. They have never tried it. You have lower priced commodity products where people will buy on impulse. EG a Chocolate bar.

    You then try and sell a $1m home to that same person....you think it's the same impulse buy?

    You are correct in that millionaires have been created at both ends. BUT you have to develop your system for your market and get really good at it. That's all that counts.

    Stephen King sells million in books....he doesn't have to sit on the phone trying to convince people to buy. He branded his name though....built his reputation up over years.

    Selling say,pink diamonds at over $100,000 per carat....you need a different strategy. A different buyer and a different approach.

    You have to build up your brand. Same thing that way.
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  • Most on here...are stuck in the "Internet Marketing" world..where $200 is like $2,000,000 to a U.H.N.W. buyer...

    There are penthouses in London going for $25,000,000+ Middle east buyers snap them up....they aren't looking for a $10 ebook though. That might be a tougher sell...

    When you see diamonds and art going for $50,000,000+ you realize there is a different world out there...you just need to step into it
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  • Profile picture of the author maxsi
    My opinion? Sell something at $10 needs the same time of a $5000 product.

    LEVERAGE is the right response
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  • Profile picture of the author miley emmy
    Sometimes Bigger doesn't equal to better because you may achieve good incentive on big sale but it will also increase your lust which results in low time for family. Otherwise bigger=Better
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    It seems to be the individual clarity or collective clarity of businesses. I knew a guy who was making 50 grand a month selling 2.99 eBooks. But others sell bigger ticket products and make peanuts.

    The Universe does not know big or small; humans allow in abundance or not, based on their clarity and lack thereof.

    When I focused on selling a 15 dollar eBook I sold a bunch more copies and made more money through my bigger ticket items too. Clarity thing, through detachment.

    Ryan
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  • Profile picture of the author Ahmed Asghar
    no bigger is not always better i think quality matters
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