Get Better At The Game

9 replies
I was born to a poor family. All my relatives were poor. Nobody went to college. Some were on disability (for reasons I never understood) or they worked at a local foundry or shop.

My Dad worked at the Ford Motor Company in Berea Ohio. He was an electrician. In our family (that lived in Ohio) that was a great job. l almost went to work there myself when I was 20 years old. A steady job. Good pay.

Except for my Dad, every relative was convinced that they were destined for poverty. My Grandfather (on my Mom's side) once told me "There is something to be said for knowing your place".

Recently, I was remembering an incident when I was maybe 17 years old, a few friends of mine and I was driving through a really nice neighborhood. Newer homes, nice yards.
The other guys said things like "Must be nice" and "I wonder who they screwed over to get that house?".

And I asked "I wonder what they know, that we do not?" And for awhile, I believed that this moment was where my future changed.

And recently, I put it together....

When I was a little kid, maybe 7 years old, I was playing checkers with my Dad. He always won.. He never let me win. And I remember one day I was frustrated that he was winning so easily.

I said something like "It's not fair. You get to be Kinged more than I do. We should change the rules. It isn't right!".

And I remember this as clear as if it happened yesterday. He looked at me and said "Don't complain about the rules. Get better at the game"..

I remember thinking about that...the rest of that day. And something in my brain changed that day. My life didn't change that day, but the direction I was headed...did.

These things stick with you. Thank you Dad.
#game
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  • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
    This is valuable advice that many many people will never or cannot seem to comprehend. These same people are the ones in the other thread who are visualizing their future without doing anything to acquire that future.

    Definition of insanity: doing the same things over and over again and expecting different results.

    The game is already made. The rules are already set. We can't change the game and we can't change the rules, but we can change how we play the game. You had a great dad!
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    • Profile picture of the author socialentry
      Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

      The game is already made. The rules are already set. We can't change the game and we can't change the rules, but we can change how we play the game. You had a great dad!
      But what if you're so good at the game they change the rules?
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

        But what if you're so good at the game they change the rules?

        Ask anyone that does SEO for Google.. Or advertises on Facebook, or Twitter or wherever. Learn the rules, and play the game better.

        The irony of it all on the internet anyways is that the rules DONT change.. they just make it harder to cheat.
        Signature
        Success is an ACT not an idea
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

        But what if you're so good at the game they change the rules?
        You mean because others feel you have an unfair advantage?

        You do what you've always done...figure out how the new rules are to your advantage, and use them.

        When I was training salespeople, and they would tell me that they got an objection, I would ask "How is that to your advantage? How can you use that to further the sale?"

        There are exceptions, but most things we see as speed bumps are really rungs to a ladder.

        Added later; Something we may have missed in my original post. He didn't let me win. He wanted me to learn, to get better. And he knew that "letting me win' would make me complacent.

        And even though playing checkers with me wasn't a challenge at all for my Dad, he kept at it, explaining what he did, making me better. Dad stuff.


        Years ago, my Son and I were playing pool. He was beating me badly. He said "Are you just letting me win?"

        And I said "No. You're just a better player than I am".

        Ha asked 'Does it bother you that I'm beating you?'

        And I said "Of course not. If I beat you, that means I won. If you beat me, that means my Son won. I win either way"/


        Now that I think about it, when I played pool with my adult Son, he nearly always beat me. And my Dad always beat me in checkers.

        Now I'm really depressed.
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  • Profile picture of the author jmosticc22
    Very wise words here, this applies to every body at any age and at any stage in life. Though it takes patients, those of us who put in the time to get better eventually see success.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
    Excellent advice, and wonderfully told. (There should be a "Thank You x10 Button.")
    : )
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    "Each problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful that it literally dwarfs the problem. The greatest success stories were created by people who recognized a problem and turned it into an opportunity."―Joseph Sugarman
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  • Profile picture of the author chuckholmes
    "Don't wish things were easier, wish you were better!" ~ Jim Rohn

    It's amazing how much our childhood impacts us. It's amazing how things our loved ones said to us can influence the way we think throughout most of our lives.

    For our lives to improve, we must improve. Set high goals, focus on continuous improvement, and surround yourself with people who uplift you and encourage you.

    I'm glad things turned around for you!
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by chuckholmes View Post

      "Don't wish things were easier, wish you were better!" ~ Jim Rohn

      It's amazing how much our childhood impacts us. It's amazing how things our loved ones said to us can influence the way we think throughout most of our lives.

      For our lives to improve, we must improve. Set high goals, focus on continuous improvement, and surround yourself with people who uplift you and encourage you.

      I'm glad things turned around for you!
      I remember seeing a movie about men fighting with swords. One young man said to another "I need a lighter sword". The other man said "No, you need to build a stronger arm".
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    There have been studies conducted that ask the question "Why do we remember certain things from the past".

    Study after study has shown we remember things that had a strong emotion attached to them.

    We're moved by our emotions.

    The best salespeople are able to attach emotion to their pitch.

    The best leaders are able to attach emotion to their speeches.

    That guy/gal that caught your eye stirred up a lot of emotions.

    If you want to be good at anything under the finger lickin sun, you've got to learn how to use emotion.
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