ADS YOU'LL NEVER SEE ON THE SUPERBOWL

15 replies
Remember that talking sock puppet on the superbowl years ago, just before the market crashed by 50%?
I contend that superbowl ads (and "award winning" ads) are a clear sign of the world of B.S. going on.
No one -- no advertiser on the superbowl--actually measures ROI on their ad expenditure.
Superbowl ads are useless if your purpose is to sell product.
Maybe if you want to snowball investors...
Maybe if you want to snowball young, gullible minds as to "good intentions"...
Maybe if you just got a whopping pile of cash you've got to launder...

But not if you actually measure "cost per lead" and "cost per sale."

You'll never see ads for Craftmatic beds there.
You'll never see Lift Alert ads there.
And you'll never see ads for Johnny's Heating And Air.

I can't imagine anyone on Warriors Forum even thinking about buying superbowl ads.
It's not hard to suggest that every superbowl advertiser is some kind of hoser. Scammer.

Don't even think about spending your hard-earned, marketing money there.
If you're going to do TV ads, stick to late nite, one minute or two minute ads, or infomercials.
Measure your cost per lead and cost per sale.
Nothing else makes sense.
Agreed?
Good.
Yours
Linwood
#ads #superbowl
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  • Hellor AMW,

    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post


    You'll never see ads for Craftmatic beds there.
    You'll never see Lift Alert ads there.
    And you'll never see ads for Johnny's Heating And Air.
    I use to belief that too...

    ...until this past SB game. Here in Tallahassee a local roofing company, real estate agent, and a law firm all had their ads running during the game.

    First thought came to my mind..."How Much Did Those Ads Set Them Back?"

    In large markets I can see locals not jumping on board, but small affiliate stations it is possible.

    Chinchilla
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    When Budweiser runs a commercial with no Clydesdales....I lose interest. It's just wrong.
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    • Profile picture of the author natostanco
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      When Budweiser runs a commercial with no Clydesdales....I lose interest. It's just wrong.
      Hahaha! I'm laughing because my partner said the same thing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

    Remember that talking sock puppet on the superbowl years ago, just before the market crashed by 50%?
    I contend that superbowl ads (and "award winning" ads) are a clear sign of the world of B.S. going on.
    No one -- no advertiser on the superbowl--actually measures ROI on their ad expenditure.
    Superbowl ads are useless if your purpose is to sell product.
    Maybe if you want to snowball investors...
    Maybe if you want to snowball young, gullible minds as to "good intentions"...
    Maybe if you just got a whopping pile of cash you've got to launder...

    But not if you actually measure "cost per lead" and "cost per sale."

    You'll never see ads for Craftmatic beds there.
    You'll never see Lift Alert ads there.
    And you'll never see ads for Johnny's Heating And Air.

    I can't imagine anyone on Warriors Forum even thinking about buying superbowl ads.
    It's not hard to suggest that every superbowl advertiser is some kind of hoser. Scammer.

    Don't even think about spending your hard-earned, marketing money there.
    If you're going to do TV ads, stick to late nite, one minute or two minute ads, or infomercials.
    Measure your cost per lead and cost per sale.
    Nothing else makes sense.
    Agreed?
    Good.
    Yours
    Linwood
    I get it and agree...
    But...

    The ads you see run on national TV are branding ads, not direct sales ads. These ads build (to varying degrees) a familiarity with certain brands that aids when a local direct sales ad runs.

    These national ads support the local direct ads.


    A friend of mine used to advertise all over town on billboards. He sold life insurance.

    I asked him how much business the ads brought in. He said "None, but the people will be more likely to take my calls".

    So can they track an immediate ROI? Maybe not. But the consumer likely feels a slightly stronger affinity with the brand.


    By the way, I sell quite a lot to the local Amish community. They almost never by nationally advertised brands. They always buy the cheapest generic brand, even on groceries.

    A fellow marketer explained it to me. They don't have TV. They never see the nationally advertised brand's commercials. So, to them, the generic brand is the same.

    These ads sell the brand, not the product.
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    I kind of agree with your post...but - I have a couple of problems with it...

    and I'm not trying to be disrespectful because I know you're a top-notch copywriter, but maybe you haven't considered this...

    most "branding" ads are not meant for the consumer.

    They're meant for the retailers that carry their products.

    Here's what I mean...

    if you have tons of salespeople out in the field trying to get your product into retailers, one of your biggest selling points is the ads you run to bring attention to your product.

    Let's say you're a carry-out or convenience store that is considering a product. Your main concern would be how much the company wanting you to carry the product would help you promote it -or how long it would sit on your shelves because of a lack of interest.

    So, these branding ads aren't asking for you to come into a factory and buy a 6 pack of pop or beer or whatever - they're putting an image in your mind that when you walk into an outlet carrying their product, you'll think about your choices.

    I understand direct response, but I also understand a difference in advertising options and requirements when you're a major manufacturer
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Good point sir. Hats off to you.
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      Linwood Austin, Direct Response Copywriter,
      http://theadmansdiary.com/ .. Phone: 801-895-9598

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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by max5ty View Post


      So, these branding ads aren't asking for you to come into a factory and buy a 6 pack of pop or beer or whatever - they're putting an image in your mind that when you walk into an outlet carrying their product, you'll think about your choices.

      In my retail store we sell a high end line of vacuum cleaners. Highly profitable, but they don't advertise nationally at all.

      So I hear "I've never heard of that brand" quite a lot.

      That's not a problem, and is easily handled....but it does indicate that brand recognition is important to some shoppers.

      National advertising probably wouldn't sell a single thing by itself. But as a tool to make local selling easier? Absolutely.

      To be fair, after studying direct response advertising for a decade or more, I wouldn't use anything else. But I can now see the reasons for national brand advertising, like on the Superbowl.
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      • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        To be fair, after studying direct response advertising for a decade or more, I wouldn't use anything else. But I can now see the reasons for national brand advertising, like on the Superbowl.

        Dear Claude,

        My beef with advertisers on the superbowl is the general sham of it all.

        Far too many advertisers who once advertised on the superbowl are now out of business. And let's not forget all the "award winning" ads, of advertisers who are also out of business.

        It's mostly entertainment. No one expects sales to go up as a result of their superbowl ad.

        Yes, it may help, somewhat, if a sales rep calls on a vendor, to sell a nationally advertised product... somewhat. But the amount of "SELL" going on in S.B. ads is just not there. It's entertaining. No call to action. No benefits. Often times you don't even know what product they are "trying" to sell.

        There is another "Claude"... a "Claude" Hopkins, who use to run national ads, and before he ran the ad, he'd send the ad to potential vendors saying, "We're going to run this ad, and if you order X number of cases, we'll include your name as a pick up place. -- in other words, a forced distribution system. But his ads were complete, with a SELLING STORY.

        I use to be a big shot in the ad agency world. And it seems to me when a company gets big enough, with wide enough distribution, advertising results just don't matter as much as other things, for example; Frito's corn chip company requires their trucks to make sure store shelves are restocked every day.

        In that case, the ad campaign was mere window dressing. - Advertising as an expense, not an asset.

        Most small business owners, when they reach some level of success get sucked into a contract to advertise in this fancy, entertaining, way... and the salesmen tells them it's "branding".

        They have to wait till year end, to see if the sales went up.

        By then, it's too late to see it was a waste.

        Remember the "California Raisins"???
        https://youtu.be/UShiwymsX0w
        Sales of raisins went nowhere.

        So... I doubt my ranting here will ever stop wasted-selling-opportunity, but it's fun to bitch a bit, here.

        I like your comments here. You're a good egg.

        Carry on.

        Linwood
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        http://theadmansdiary.com/ .. Phone: 801-895-9598

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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

          Dear Claude,

          My beef with advertisers on the superbowl is the general sham of it all.

          Far too many advertisers who once advertised on the superbowl are now out of business. And let's not forget all the "award winning" ads, of advertisers who are also out of business.
          The fact that you can win an award for advertising disturbs me. These aren't movies They are pitches. The only way to know who won is to count the money.


          Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

          Yes, it may help, somewhat, if a sales rep calls on a vendor, to sell a nationally advertised product... somewhat. But the amount of "SELL" going on in S.B. ads is just not there. It's entertaining. No call to action. No benefits. Often times you don't even know what product they are "trying" to sell.
          I can see cars and hamburger ads supporting local ads, but you're right. I watch some ads and know...know they are just some inventive creative type flexing their muscles. And the sale isn't to the public, but was made to the company executives.


          Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

          In that case, the ad campaign was mere window dressing. - Advertising as an expense, not an asset.
          That's the single greatest mistake I've fought to overcome in my seminars on advertising (years ago), Advertising and marketing as an expense...with a budget. As though you are paying a light bill.



          Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

          Most small business owners, when they reach some level of success get sucked into a contract to advertise in this fancy, entertaining, way... and the salesmen tells them it's "branding".
          I think they get successful, and attain some status...and begin thinking that the advertising should appeal to the cultural elite, as entertainment. I also see this in companies where the son or daughter becomes the marketing executive. Ads are now made to impress, not to sell. The beginning of the end.

          My local ad reps still think that being witty, funny, or creative is the key. One phenomenon I've seen with every ad rep I've ever met. Without exception, they have never read a single book on advertising or marketing. And when I bring up that they could sell far more ads if they knew how to advertise, to create actual sales for their clients...they look at me like I'm from Mars.


          Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

          I like your comments here. You're a good egg.

          Carry on.

          Linwood
          Sooooo....you've seen my photo, eh?
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

    You'll never see ads for Craftmatic beds there.
    You'll never see Lift Alert ads there.
    And you'll never see ads for Johnny's Heating And Air.

    I can't imagine anyone on Warriors Forum even thinking about buying superbowl ads.
    Ok so I have "Thought" about it... BUT, its not just the investment of the time for the Ad on the SB. There are "Requirements" that would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 10 to 50X the cost you are thinking the Ad would cost. Meaning you have to have existing ad spend to even be considered for an ad spot during the game.

    And then thinking about the actual demographics and psychographics of advertising on the BIG game would be out of the realm of most any and every "Little" entrepreneur, let alone a small geographically tight mom and pop business.
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  • Profile picture of the author eccj
    I thought the Park Car ad by Hyundai was the best of the night.

    It checked all the boxes of what a Super Bowl ad should be.

    It was memorable.

    It was funny.

    IT ACTUALLY SOLD THE PRODUCT!

    I'm sure there were a ton of people out there that have to park in tight spaces, like me in my condo, that thought "man..... now that is something that would make my life easier."

    Anyways... does anyone know how much Gary Vee got to waste all that money for Planter's Nuts?
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    I was just checking my credit score on Creditkarma.

    Based on my score, it recommended dozens of credit cards. At the very top of the page it said...
    "We suggest offers based on your credit profile, Approval Odds, and money we make from our partners."

    I laughed out loud.

    If I ever sell affiliate products, I'm using that. Bad marketing? Yup. Funny as hell? Yup.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      RE: CREDITKARMA...
      It is actually creepy to see TV commercials for Experian, Credit Karma, and Credit Sesame, trying to get folks to sign up to "improve their credit score". 



      Long before the age of irony, people use to SAVE MONEY to buy a home or car or an education. No more.
      I'm thinking that we're seeing these goddamn credit improvement commercials because we've reach #PeakDebt or Total Debt Saturation, and those fat bankers need even the basement dwelling, cry-baby, Millennials to get out there and borrow and buy, borrow and buy, borrow and buy. 

      I don't get a good feeling about all this. Kind of like in 1994 when the TV and radio ads said "Come on down and borrow 125% of your home's equity." Who knew that the housing market would crash to hell, just a few years later? Yeah, who knew? 125% cash out? Right. 

      If the bankers are scrapping the bottom of the barrel like this, you just know something stinky this way comes. 

      Heads up folks. 

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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    I dont have much to say on this, but I must confess.... that the super bowl ads this year really made me notice the hyundai brand, and reconsider it as not just some stupid cheap car....

    It's perceived value was definitely raised. Im sure alot more people will want to purchase one after that ad.

    Will the roi be there? I dont know, but Im sure sales will spike.
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    One of the things I told Scott who sold the most print advertising in his London co
    last year was to find advertisers who weren't using direct response and align with
    their previous buying decision.

    That was the advertiser wanted to be seen by the publication's readership.

    They had what he wanted.

    So all Scott had to reaffirm the advertiser made a great decision in buying readership,
    and if he would like to expand the same type of audience,
    then Scott has them.

    We can pontificate all we want, but advertisers buy for their reasons...
    even if it makes no sense to everybody else.

    Scott sold advertising to a small restaurant.

    The price would mean one hell-of-a-lot worth
    of meals to be sold to recover the restauranters
    ad costs.

    But Scott planted the seed in his head that being "featured"
    in an international airline
    the in-flight magazine would be very special.

    He bit and took it a step further,
    he was going to cut out the "feature"
    and hang the frame in a prominent place.

    Buyers buy for their own reasons.

    A copywriter by the name of Brian Keith Voiles wrote for
    Gary Halbert and Jay Abraham had a client brag that he got Brian
    to write an ad for him
    yet didn't run his ad.

    The reward was bragging rights!

    People buy for their own reasons.

    Best,
    Ewen
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