Bedell's First Scientific Principle Of Selling

9 replies
He has six principle, ya know.
And for years, I've personally focus on the 4th principle... that "Prospects, Not 'People', But Prospects, Will Read Any Amount of Ad Copy, As Long As It's Interesting And Helpful".
But over the years of thinkin' and thinkin' and observing and observing... I've come to see the beauty of his first listed principle.
And I have to confess, I still don't think I've plunged the depths of his 1st principle.
Perhaps you can add some thought to this.
His 1st principle is this: ALL GOOD SELLING IS SERVING.
You can take that thought and run in dozens of directions with it.
One example from his book, was the story of a process chicken manufacturer who called on him to help increase sales.
His conclusion was that no amount of regular "advertising" was going to really change the way Mrs. Jones bought her chicken. Typically, she would go to the butcher department of the supermarket and she would trust what ever the butcher would recommend. Never mind the ads, the butcher had the biggest influence.
So, they devised a plan to have small, in-store cooking classes in the butcher's area. And guess what? It was a hit. Sales increased. Why? Because the butcher felt indebted to the manufacturer for hosting the classes. And...foot traffic to the store, and the butcher's corner increased because they were "serving" Mrs. Jones... with cooking ideas, and what not.
So, when you're mapping out a selling strategy, keep this in mind. "All Good Selling Is Serving".
If you can "out-serve" your competitors, chances are you will "out-sell" your competitors.
You can out-serve with more information, with demos, with training, with guarantees, with bonuses that no one else offers.
You can go in a lot of directions here. But one thing you might do is print out the phrase "ALL GOOD SELLING IS SERVING" and post it on your office wall.
Just thinking.
Linwood.
#bedell #principle #scientific #selling
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

    He has six principle, ya know.
    And for years, I've personally focus on the 4th principle... that "Prospects, Not 'People', But Prospects, Will Read Any Amount of Ad Copy, As Long As It's Interesting And Helpful".
    But over the years of thinkin' and thinkin' and observing and observing... I've come to see the beauty of his first listed principle.
    And I have to confess, I still don't think I've plunged the depths of his 1st principle.
    Perhaps you can add some thought to this.
    His 1st principle is this: ALL GOOD SELLING IS SERVING.
    You can take that thought and run in dozens of directions with it.
    One example from his book, was the story of a process chicken manufacturer who called on him to help increase sales.
    His conclusion was that no amount of regular "advertising" was going to really change the way Mrs. Jones bought her chicken. Typically, she would go to the butcher department of the supermarket and she would trust what ever the butcher would recommend. Never mind the ads, the butcher had the biggest influence.
    So, they devised a plan to have small, in-store cooking classes in the butcher's area. And guess what? It was a hit. Sales increased. Why? Because the butcher felt indebted to the manufacturer for hosting the classes. And...foot traffic to the store, and the butcher's corner increased because they were "serving" Mrs. Jones... with cooking ideas, and what not.
    So, when you're mapping out a selling strategy, keep this in mind. "All Good Selling Is Serving".
    If you can "out-serve" your competitors, chances are you will "out-sell" your competitors.
    You can out-serve with more information, with demos, with training, with guarantees, with bonuses that no one else offers.
    You can go in a lot of directions here. But one thing you might do is print out the phrase "ALL GOOD SELLING IS SERVING" and post it on your office wall.
    Just thinking.
    Linwood.
    1. All good selling is serving.
    2. People only buy to get benefits.
    3. Benefits must be supported by product points and features.
    4. People will read any amount of copy -- as long as it's interesting, helpful or service-rendering copy.
    5. For consistent profitable advertising: there must be planning, and on time.
    6. The "Boss" -- the top management -- must understand, believe in and enforce these foundation truths and the principles that make advertising work.

    As I have developed over the years I have come to understand there is truly only one rule, and that's the first. Rules 2, 3, 4, and 5 support rule #1 and I would say now looking at it, I would suggest 2, 3, 4,and 5 are how #1 should play out.

    In the new digital age... this is even MORE applicable than when the formula was created in the 40's.

    Look at Tag lines like "You can do it, we can help" ( Home Depot ) his applies directly to the first Rule.

    "Melts in Your Mouth, Not in Your Hands" ( M&M's ) directly applies to #2

    "It Does Exactly What It Says on the Tin." ( Ronseal wood stain ) Applies to #3

    I like to use "think Different" ( Apple ) as the example for #4. The TV ad was long.. the print ads were long - think back to 1997 and this type of ad was running against 'Just Do it" ( Nike ) as an example... and in contrast the Apple text based print ads were very long vs an image of an athlete and the words "Just Do It"

    5 is no longer about message but about the core principle of "Branding" and advertising in general.

    For people providing services.. I am a strong believer in going through the process with the client. We do this and that and this and then this.. and the take away is that there will be a minimal percentage of "why the hell would I pay to have that done, he just told me how to do it" vs a greater percentage of those that think - "Yeah I am going to hire that guy to do that for my business - i don't have the time for that crap!"

    And the reason I play this out often is because in the process of detailing all this out you are giving the benefit, you are explaining features and points... and talking about how to do anything is "Long winded" and its real easy to gauge interest while doing this - hence identifying "Real Prospects" vs the schmos that are there to "Steal your idea"

    Granted over the years I have developed a selling style that the prospect asks how it works ( what's involved ) to initiate that portion of the sales process - I don't force that on any and every one.

    I just firmly believe that coming from a place of service to the person or people or organization you are speaking with and genuinely having their best interest in mind is refreshing from the perspective of the other side of the equation - the buyer.

    I turn down more work than I accept because the services I provide are not the right match for the client. and I straight up tell them that, and when I can refer them to other providers that would be a better match, I do. And the look on their faces is priceless, and often times we get into the well why not conversation, and after that they understand and walk away with a level of trust and respect. And I would say 50% over time, those clients come back asking if they are "Now" a better match.

    If you look at more Modern Works you have Gary Vaynerchuck's "Jab Jab Jab Left Hook" which is oh so very much the same thing - give give give - sell the snot out of them. Pretty much the same message with a modern twist and delivery
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    • Profile picture of the author Skywriting
      - All good selling is serving.-
      A lot of the rest are not correct. People buy on emotion.
      They buy based on how they think the product will make them feel.
      Unless you want to call that a "benefit".
      And owners can be very remote.
      And some bosses only care about results, not methods.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

    His conclusion was that no amount of regular "advertising" was going to really change the way Mrs. Jones bought her chicken. Typically, she would go to the butcher department of the supermarket and she would trust what ever the butcher would recommend. Never mind the ads, the butcher had the biggest influence.
    So, they devised a plan to have small, in-store cooking classes in the butcher's area. And guess what? It was a hit. Sales increased. Why? Because the butcher felt indebted to the manufacturer for hosting the classes. And...foot traffic to the store, and the butcher's corner increased because they were "serving" Mrs. Jones... with cooking ideas, and what not.
    .
    That's a brilliant strategy that I'll study, and try to pull out the principles involved, to apply to my business. Thank you.


    Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

    For people providing services.. I am a strong believer in going through the process with the client. We do this and that and this and then this.. and the take away is that there will be a minimal percentage of "why the hell would I pay to have that done, he just told me how to do it" vs a greater percentage of those that think - "Yeah I am going to hire that guy to do that for my business - i don't have the time for that crap!"

    And the reason I play this out often is because in the process of detailing all this out you are giving the benefit, you are explaining features and points... and talking about how to do anything is "Long winded" and its real easy to gauge interest while doing this - hence identifying "Real Prospects" vs the schmos that are there to "Steal your idea"
    For several years I spoke to groups about local online marketing. I'd hold 3 or 4 hour seminars...and tell them everything....hold nothing back..give every tool I used....every resource...answer any question, and give all the steps.

    I did that on purpose to show;
    1) That this was an enormously complex series of services to get the desired results.
    2) That it took way less time, and was frankly cheaper...if they just had me do it for them.

    I was literally just describing (in great detail) everything they would get in the service, if I did it for them.

    If they had an in house online marketing person, sometime they would just take the notes, and do it themselves..
    Or they would just hand it over to me (my team).

    Anywhere from 10-40% of the audience would buy from me without any closing effort at all. And other few wold buy from me later, with a private conversation in he halls.

    I didn't know at the time that this is a standard strategy used by many service providers.
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  • Thing I loved so 'bout SKOOL was magnets.

    Cos yeah, if'n they powahful enough, you could run a pair as ear rings without Mom gowin' crazy bcs piercin' ishoos.

    An' I guess especiale magnetism is inherent in Bedell's 1st maxim.

    Bcs here be an attractive force between poles apart which kinda functions maximally to myootyool advantage.

    I would wanna call it the irresistible attraction of what you need but don't frickin' have rn.

    An' I say this bcs hooman magnets (such as we be, in all our glory) romp out from mood to mood, day by day, seekin' all kindsa meetups to make splendid what they perceive in that moment to represent the juiciest evah horizon.

    Datin' analogy:

    Yeah, I wanna find my soulmate -- the ONE gonna complement my loodicrously stoopid incomplete ass.

    So we got all kindsa magnet stuffs gowin' on.

    Degrees of incompleteness of attraction regardin' all kindsa stuff.

    Which gotta mean there be a perfectly opposite pole out there to hug us sweet like we complete.

    The singularly exotic solootion.

    I ain't too sciency, but all I know is ...

    you put a coupla magnets close enough together, they are kinda BLAMMO.

    Till they find one another, an' till you pull 'em apart, they two separate bunches of stuff radiatin' WANT WANT WANT.

    But when you got em' there, kissin' sweet in the palm of your hand, they as one.
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    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Princess, your stuff be like reading Huck Finn, a bit of a challenge but worth it.
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      Linwood Austin, Direct Response Copywriter,
      http://theadmansdiary.com/ .. Phone: 801-895-9598

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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        The ad as a community service idea,
        I wrote at the bottom of the most ripped ad for web design...

        "A community service by (X)"

        That ad headline was a warning not to buy
        until the reader got answers to 5 questions.

        It went on to load the buyer with questions to ask a web designer.

        Of course it was a set up for failure of any other web designer except my client.

        The ad also pointed out the hard cost of getting the decision wrong, further emphasizing the service to a would-be buyer of a website.

        Best,
        Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
          It'd be fun to see the web site as an example.
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          Linwood Austin, Direct Response Copywriter,
          http://theadmansdiary.com/ .. Phone: 801-895-9598

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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

            It'd be fun to see the web site as an example.
            Here you go, Linwood...

            https://www.warriorforum.com/offline...5k-2-days.html
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            • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
              ewenmack
              I'M IMPRESSED.. you're a good egg, near as I can tell.

              Way back, when I first started my ad agency in Santa Barbara, I bought a yellow page ad, about 1/4 page.... and I make it look like a warning message from the publishers of the yellow pages... WARNING: DON'T CALL ANY AD AGENCY UNTIL YOU READ THIS.

              As I recall, I made about $20 or more for ever $1 I spent on yellow pages, and Santa Barbara is a small market.

              Well, the real story behind the scenes was interesting... of course as soon as the yellow pages came out... every ad agency in town, grabbed the book to take a look at their own ad, to make sure the yellow pages didn't screw it up, that it was on a prominent page, etc.

              And of course they saw MY AD... my "WARNING" ad... and THEY WERE PISSED.

              They were on the phone with each other bitching about my ad, and even wrote anonymous letters to me, telling me what a dick I was, in so many words... that my style of advertising belonged in Barstow, California, not a sophisticated town like Santa Barbara, etc.

              One copywriter from another agency was friendly with me and smiled when we bumped into each other at a pub... shortly after the yellow pages came out... "They're mad at me." I said to him. "Joke 'em if they can't take a *uck." was his reply.



              So... ewenmack.... this ad of yours, is VERY SERVICE oriented. You're doing prospective customers a great service.

              Hat tip to you.

              Linwood
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              Linwood Austin, Direct Response Copywriter,
              http://theadmansdiary.com/ .. Phone: 801-895-9598

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