Convenience store giant 7-Eleven tests cashierless store

by WF- Enzo Administrator
13 replies
Store chain 7-Eleven announced that they are testing a cashierless store at their HQ in Irving, Texas. The store is only available to employees, and features popular products sold in other regular 7-Eleven stores including the famous Slurpee.



As it is currently available only to employees, the only way to shop for now is to download an app, signup, check-in at the store, shop, and leave. Shoppers will receive their receipt via the app.

The debut of this store concept is one of 7-Eleven's latest foray into tech. As noted in its announcement, the retail chain already launched its mobile checkout feature in New York and the 7NOW delivery service, plus their partnership with Microsoft in providing Microsoft 365 and Power BI to its franchisees to analyse store performance.

Mani Suri, 7-Eleven SVP and CIO, said in a statement:

"Introducing new store technology to 7-Eleven employees first has proven to be a very productive way to test and learn before launching to a wider audience. They are honest and candid with their feedback, which enables us to learn and quickly make adjustments to improve the experience."

Thoughts?
#7eleven #cashierless #convenience #giant #store #tests
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  • Profile picture of the author James London
    I think it's brilliant as it pushes the edge when it comes to what's possible as well as the most efficient way to go about doing things. Digitalization at its best?
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  • Profile picture of the author jbuenavides
    In Korea, you can pay cashierless using a cute robot.
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  • Profile picture of the author erealmz
    I have about 5 7-Elevens in my area that I shop at regularly (out of hundreds in and around my city)

    The thing about them is that some are in way better condition than others. Out of the five that I go to, I frequent 2 of them more than any other because they are closest to me. One of them is pretty decent. The employees are nice. The store is clean. The other is dirty, the cashiers are rude and they rush me whenever I pull out my 7-Eleven app to get my points. And worst of all, their hot food is ALWAYS DRY. I'll link a picture tomorrow.

    If any store needs to be automated, it would be that one. Otherwise, I love the cashiers at the other ones. They are part of the 711 experience and it wouldn't be the same without them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    How will automation handle theft? In many areas that will be the problem to solve. I think automating employee food venues and shopping is a great idea - didn't Amazon do this, too?
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      How will automation handle theft? In many areas that will be the problem to solve. I think automating employee food venues and shopping is a great idea - didn't Amazon do this, too?
      My first thought exactly.

      Even at the grocery stores, you can check yourself out. It seems to me that theft would make this unprofitable. Maybe that's already factored in.
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      How will automation handle theft? In many areas that will be the problem to solve. I think automating employee food venues and shopping is a great idea - didn't Amazon do this, too?
      If you look at the Amazon Go model, you basically check in when entering the store with a QR code and grab your items and then leave. The store is filled with sensors to know what you have grabbed. and you are billed for the items you grabbed once you leave. there is no physical scanning involved.

      I believe I read somewhere that the initial Amazon Go store in Seattle it cost like $1,000,000 for just the technology to make the store operate.

      I think we have already seen a progression of "education" in the space. Walmart had a scan and grab app that they were going to implement across 100 stores at one point, and that was scrapped. NOW we are seeing what could arguably be the best solution for the stores themselves - and absolutely minimizing the shopping experience for the consumer - The whole online ordering and you just drive up and click a button on the App you are there and they bring the groceries to your car.

      Between that and delivery, I suspect the extra man power involved, but the decrease to 0% of theft will be the path most any and every retailor takes.

      Cashierless stores SOUNDS cool - but will never work in the States. someplace like China on the other hand where FEAR is a factor, will be more prevalent.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      You install a huge arm by the door with a big hand that automatically slaps the butts of thieves?


      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      How will automation handle theft? In many areas that will be the problem to solve. I think automating employee food venues and shopping is a great idea - didn't Amazon do this, too?
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    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      How will automation handle theft? In many areas that will be the problem to solve.
      Don't forget that theft isn't just a customer issue. For retailers with a large number of casual or part-time staff who are handling cash, theft by employees is a significant cost factor - and one that helps sell automation to retail management.
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      • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

        Don't forget that theft isn't just a customer issue. For retailers with a large number of casual or part-time staff who are handling cash, theft by employees is a significant cost factor - and one that helps sell automation to retail management.
        Cash register theft isn't that common and became less common with debit cards, advances in POS systems and cameras that are fixed on each drawer. And they all have internal processes that make it negligible. I don't wanna write out the process. But it makes it pretty difficult to get away with anything substantial.

        Most shrink/loss is merch that goes unaccounted for. Due to theft or error. Front end automation is and will always be about cutting front end payroll. This is the corporate point-of-view.
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  • Profile picture of the author link201
    I just like that human to human interaction. Job automation isn't coming, its here
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      Originally Posted by link201 View Post

      I just like that human to human interaction. Job automation isn't coming, its here
      There is a historical path here that many miss... The advent of "Machinery" I am sure in the day was going to take jobs. The advent the computer.. was going to take jobs. The advent of Robotics was going to take jobs. We hear on the daily AI is going to take jobs.

      Automation... Has a extraordinary track record of doing exactly the opposite. If you go look at a Walmart right now that does pick up and delivery... how many new positions have been filled? Automation is CREATING jobs and creating probably a more positive human to human experience.

      And your right.. its NOT coming it is here, and here to stay... AI isn't coming, its in its infant stage... its here, and we have the miss fortune of early adopters being the robo calling industry.
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      • Profile picture of the author Odahh
        [QUOTE=savidge4;11582474
        Automation... Has a extraordinary track record of doing exactly the opposite. If you go look at a Walmart right now that does pick up and delivery... how many new positions have been filled? Automation is CREATING jobs and creating probably a more positive human to human experience.
        [/QUOTE]

        i have given up .go back 25 years and try to explain you tuber Instagram influencers and how you buy stuff at wall mart and make a profit selling it on ebay or amazon..oh wait 10 years in the past might be far enough to not have anyone understand you.

        the uber driver yesterday who runs a couple other businesses and works his uber gig 55 hours a week said he makes well over a grand a week and leases a nice car from and uber affiliate program for a few hundred dollars a week and will stay in motel rooms as a business write off .

        many more jobs like that where the company doesn't pay much(but allows tips) or set hours for you but when you want top work connects you with customers and the other stuff a large corporation can take care of.

        and more and more without high over heads for the company or the worker .
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      • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
        Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post


        Automation... Has a extraordinary track record of doing exactly the opposite. If you go look at a Walmart right now that does pick up and delivery... how many new positions have been filled? Automation is CREATING jobs and creating probably a more positive human to human experience.
        Walmart has cut the number of employees per store as compared to 5-10 years ago. And cut hours too. Automation in retail at the store level doesn't create jobs. There's nothing to back that up. I know retail like the back of my hand. What you are saying just isn't true.

        I haven't worked retail in a while. But I was there when self-checkout lanes were first rolling out. The whole point of that -- from a corporate point-of-view -- was to cut front end staff.

        Front end is the cashiers and cashier managers/supervisors.



        The whole point of automation is to cut staff. Not create staff.

        Blatant example -- the whole sales pitch of software that automates stuff is to cut staff costs.

        Look, I know the PR spin. A store cuts 50 full time employees. But then spins it as creating 25 new P/T jobs as "pickers".

        It's still a net loss of jobs/hours. And that's the point.

        Ex: The Stop and Shop I frequent, has 12 self checkout lanes. That used to require 12 cashiers. Now they have one person that attends when the light flashes. That's a loss of 11 jobs. No matter what the "spin" is.
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