HOW TO MAKE $100,000 A YEAR OFF AN ACRE OF LAND (Direct Marketing + Farming)

35 replies
There is a style of farming, called "NO TILL" gardening/farming.
Turns out that NO TILL farming, is better for the microbes and earthworms and soil life.
Tillage (tractor farming) really plays havoc on soil life.
And there is a style of farming called MARKET GARDENING... it's all about selling your veggies to your local buyers (not Walmart or Costco, as they will NOT pay full price)... local, as in DIRECT MARKETING to them.

I bring all this up, because Warriors are always looking for new ways to make money. And magically, folks everywhere get hungry 3 times a day.

If you've been keeping up on current events, the national debt, the virus out of that Asian country, the price of oil and the stock market, and all those things... one would think it might be smart to get the hang of back yard farming. Just saying...

Think about it, most of the products on the shelves at Walmart, and Costco, hell even Trader Joe's, come from California or Brazil.... And there are no stores across the country with any back room storage to speak of. The "warehouse" is actually on a semi-truck rolling down interstate 5 as we speak. If those trucks stop rolling, for what ever reason (gas prices, quarantine, riots, bad weather credit-markets freezing up, "Cash On Delivery, pal" ) aren't we all kinda screwed?

If that happens, the local farmer/gardener will be KING.

But you don't have to wait for all that to happen to be a success in gardening.

There are guys out there bringing in $100,000 a year or more off an acre of land using NO TILL and MARKET GARDENING methods.

That sure beats the tractor farmers who get sometimes $300 a year off an acre AND they have sell to Walmart and Costco, -- not local -- 'cause they're not "direct marketing".

Seeds don't cost much. And there is land everywhere, lawns, back yards, you name it. There's even a guy in Vancouver, Canada who has a profitable farm right on top of asphalt parking lots. Amazing.

Let's say you're wildly successful with online marketing... would it hurt you much to spend some time getting to know your soil?

You think online marketing is where it's at... imagine blending your marketing skill with a basic real product like carrots, kale, tomatoes, cabbage, etc.

Just thinking.
And thinking hard.
Linwood
#$100 #acre #direct #farming #land #make #marketing #year
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Second thread about gardening and farming methods (not necessarily interchangeable terms) - are you a gardener....or a farmer? Just curious.

    Other money making ideas for those who don't mind putting in some work on the land....check out Mike McGroarty. he has a cool plant gig and is a pretty good online and offine marketer, too.

    Till and no-till debate is not new - works better in some areas than others. Very labor intensive which is why larger farms who are no-till use more chemicals (pesticides/herbicides) than tilling methods.

    I've lived on farms and have had large gardens of my own - but the only farm for me now is a horse farm where I spend a lot of my time. If I asked my friend who owns the farm what his cash yield is per acre - he'd likely throw a riding boot at me.


    For someone with a couple acres, the willingness to work and learn - and who lives near an area of upscale eateries....growing an organic garden and selling the yield can be profitable.
    Done right it can be VERY profitable.


    But isn't that true of marketing, copywriting - and many other types of work one might do?.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      Second thread about gardening and farming methods (not necessarily interchangeable terms) - are you a gardener....or a farmer? Just curious.

      Other money making ideas for those who don't mind putting in some work on the land....check out Mike McGroarty. he has a cool plant gig and is a pretty good online and offine marketer, too.

      Till and no-till debate is not new - works better in some areas than others. Very labor intensive which is why larger farms who are no-till use more chemicals (pesticides/herbicides) than tilling methods.

      I've lived on farms and have had large gardens of my own - but the only farm for me now is a horse farm where I spend a lot of my time. If I asked my friend who owns the farm what his cash yield is per acre - he'd likely throw a riding boot at me.


      For someone with a couple acres, the willingness to work and learn - and who lives near an area of upscale eateries....growing an organic garden and selling the yield can be profitable.
      Done right it can be VERY profitable.


      But isn't that true of marketing, copywriting - and many other types of work one might do?.

      Dear Kay,

      I grew up on a 700 acre farm in Virginia.

      When I came of age, I left the farm and spent years as a direct response advertising copywriter. One of my advertising hero's was James Webb Young. He was a Madison Ave guy... but also owned a farm in New Mexico.

      I love both, marketing and farming.

      For years I thought marketing was the home of "creativity"... but over the years, I realized that farmers have to be much more creative than admen. Farmers have to deal not only with markets, but weather, soil life, animals, timing, planning, and neighbors.

      Does that answer your question?
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    and then you have knuckle heads like myself that has broke ground on my "Farming" project and am selling Top Soil off at $900 a truck load. ( cant stand getting my hands dirty - J/K )
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  • Profile picture of the author AffiliateRag
    Just get Bloomberg to teach you how lol!

    In all seriousness this is great post. Our codependent society would have major life threatening issues with something as simple as a diesel shortage. This is why years ago I began studying survival techniques. of course I still stink at most of them but at least I have a fighting chance
    That said, those of us who study and learn marketing will figure out how to make money in most of those situations. Great points about the 1 acre 100,000 vs 300. Mass production versus niche marketing!
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Originally Posted by AffiliateRag View Post

      Just get Bloomberg to teach you how lol!

      In all seriousness this is great post. Our codependent society would have major life threatening issues with something as simple as a diesel shortage. This is why years ago I began studying survival techniques. of course I still stink at most of them but at least I have a fighting chance
      That said, those of us who study and learn marketing will figure out how to make money in most of those situations. Great points about the 1 acre 100,000 vs 300. Mass production versus niche marketing!

      Mr. Bloomberg.. disparaging farming seems to me like a moron. All true wealth, moves from the country side into the cities... We can all get along without Wall Street, Hollywood, and Washington D.C. But all those city folks would sh*t bricks without produce coming from fly-over country.... in 3 days time.
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      • Profile picture of the author AffiliateRag
        Mr. Bloomberg.. disparaging farming seems to me like a moron. All true wealth, moves from the country side into the cities... We can all get along without Wall Street, Hollywood, and Washington D.C. But all those city folks would sh*t bricks without produce coming from fly-over country.... in 3 days time.
        No doubt! Bloomberg saying he can teach anyone to farm only proves how disconnected some people are from the reality of what it requires to be a true farmer. You practically need a chemistry degree, a marketing degree and a horticulture degree these days!
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Farmers have to deal not only with markets, but weather, soil life, animals, timing, planning, and neighbors.

    I grew up on my grandparents 800 acre farm in Indiana...and the above is spot on. There were many large farms on both sides of my family and the hardest working - and smartest - people I ever knew lived on those farms.



    My Grandfather knew it was going to rain at least 24 hrs before the weatherman did....and he could fix or improvise almost any piece of equipment. I can't tell of the hardships as I was spoiled...I tamed the calves and the lambs and barn cats and rode horses...and except for cleaning stalls, didn't do a lick of work.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      I grew up on my grandparents 800 acre farm in Indiana...and the above is spot on.

      There is a farmer down the road from me, who has 55 acres of alfalfa growing. Sometimes he is out there in the middle of the night, harvesting and baling hay. The condo's and housing that grew up around him will sometimes call the cops on him if he's out harvesting late at night. But he just laughs and ignores the cops cause he's got to beat the coming rains. I think it's laughable that the neighbors who are new comers, bitch and complain.



      God bless the farmers. I hope folks who stumble on this thread, will see the light and learn to grow. It's important.



      As I see it, the bankers have ruined farming... but promoting a farming method that allows them to get in the middle of it all, as the farmer mortgages his farm and his life, to get a new tractor, new combine, new truck, etc...



      Let me put it this way... which is better...

      ONE 300 acre farm?

      or 300 one-acre farms?



      The banks LOVE the big farm, and the little farms actually put more people to work and give use healthier food and more variety.



      Just thinking.

      Linwood
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    • Profile picture of the author Reddevil007
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      I grew up on my grandparents 800 acre farm in Indiana...and the above is spot on. There were many large farms on both sides of my family and the hardest working - and smartest - people I ever knew lived on those farms.



      My Grandfather knew it was going to rain at least 24 hrs before the weatherman did....and he could fix or improvise almost any piece of equipment. I can't tell of the hardships as I was spoiled...I tamed the calves and the lambs and barn cats and rode horses...and except for cleaning stalls, didn't do a lick of work.
      Got a farm myself which I have given on a profit sharing basis to farmer and have to concur with what the OP says here
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post


    I bring all this up, because Warriors are always looking for new ways to make money. And magically, folks everywhere get hungry 3 times a day.
    Don't know much about the 1-acre no-till situation...

    but I know those farming in the cannabis industry right now are doing good.

    It's being called by many as the new gold rush.
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    • Profile picture of the author SARubin
      Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

      Think about it, most of the products on the shelves at Walmart, and Costco, hell even Trader Joe's, come from California or Brazil.... And there are no stores across the country with any back room storage to speak of. The "warehouse" is actually on a semi-truck rolling down interstate 5 as we speak. If those trucks stop rolling, for what ever reason (gas prices, quarantine, riots, bad weather credit-markets freezing up, "Cash On Delivery, pal" ) aren't we all kinda screwed?
      I'm a little late to the "prepper" game. But if (when) the SHTF - I have about 6 months worth of the 3 primary "B"s stored up to keep my family going. And even though I only have enough room for a small garden, I have plenty of neighbors with small farms for bartering.


      Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

      It's being called by many as the new gold rush.
      Mine is more green than gold (with lots of sugar coated hairs)
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  • Profile picture of the author IGotMine
    I've made over $100K in a year off an 8 x 12 ft room and a single 1000 watt HPS lamp. It's known as a hydroponic sea-of green.

    It's not a new idea.

    You can grow more produce in a quarter-acre greenhouse with hydroponics than you can on 100 acres of row crops.

    Also, not a new idea.
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    • Profile picture of the author AffiliateRag
      I used to have friends that did similar things...i think they ended up in jail though lol
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  • Profile picture of the author theemperor
    Thanks for this suggestion, it has triggered an idea for me, which requires 1 square meter of land or balcony space to get started:

    Grow herbs!

    Herbs seem to sell for quite a lot of money in the supermarkets, but grow like weeds once you get them started in the garden. (I live in a subtropical climate so that probably helps: I remember ripping out so much mint and chucking it like it was a weed!).

    So I my thinking here, for fun is to grow some herbs with the kids, then sell them door to door, with the kids, and the money made is their pocket money. Get them started young!

    And if you don't have a balcony or garden, you probably know someone who does. Or maybe you can do some guerrilla gardening!
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    I used to have an herb garden (zone 9 US) - but now I grow herbs in 3-4 large pots on the patio. They look good, smell great and easy to clip some off for supper. Check for farmer's markets in your area and sell there, too.
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    • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      I used to have an herb garden (zone 9 US) - but now I grow herbs in 3-4 large pots on the patio. They look good, smell great and easy to clip some off for supper. Check for farmer's markets in your area and sell there, too.
      I'm 9b

      Have you used the recyclable cloth pots yet?
      If not, you should.

      They are fantastic and they seriously increase yield...
      without doing anything else different.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
    One of the marketing methods of these farmers who generate some $100,000 a year in sales, is some of them sell shares UP FRONT for the harvest that is still months away. It's called CSA... community supported agriculture.

    It's kinda like the futures market, but on a smaller scale.

    Sometimes a CSA membership requires you to grab a hoe and help out on the farm as well.

    Kinda cool.

    Linwood
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    I worked 17 years on sheep and beef cattle farms. Another 3 years on orchards.

    I've toyed with the idea of raising beef on my on account lately.

    But I'd rather use my mind and not body
    to generate income now.

    Done my time getting beat up by sheep, cattle and the weather.

    Best,
    Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Have you used the recyclable cloth pots yet?
    I haven't tried them - I have about a dozen heavy, large (and decent looking) resin pots I've used now for 5 years. I'll look into those cloth pots this summer, though.


    Done my time getting beat up by sheep, cattle and the weather.
    The weather allowed me a few hours of 'horse therapy' last sunday and I'm still sporting a couple bruises from that fun. I think farming has to be one of the most demanding careers there is - on every continent.
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  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

    There is a style of farming, called "NO TILL" gardening/farming.
    Turns out that NO TILL farming, is better for the microbes and earthworms and soil life.
    Tillage (tractor farming) really plays havoc on soil life.
    And there is a style of farming called MARKET GARDENING... it's all about selling your veggies to your local buyers (not Walmart or Costco, as they will NOT pay full price)... local, as in DIRECT MARKETING to them.

    I bring all this up, because Warriors are always looking for new ways to make money. And magically, folks everywhere get hungry 3 times a day.

    If you've been keeping up on current events, the national debt, the virus out of that Asian country, the price of oil and the stock market, and all those things... one would think it might be smart to get the hang of back yard farming. Just saying...

    Think about it, most of the products on the shelves at Walmart, and Costco, hell even Trader Joe's, come from California or Brazil.... And there are no stores across the country with any back room storage to speak of. The "warehouse" is actually on a semi-truck rolling down interstate 5 as we speak. If those trucks stop rolling, for what ever reason (gas prices, quarantine, riots, bad weather credit-markets freezing up, "Cash On Delivery, pal" ) aren't we all kinda screwed?

    If that happens, the local farmer/gardener will be KING.

    But you don't have to wait for all that to happen to be a success in gardening.

    There are guys out there bringing in $100,000 a year or more off an acre of land using NO TILL and MARKET GARDENING methods.

    That sure beats the tractor farmers who get sometimes $300 a year off an acre AND they have sell to Walmart and Costco, -- not local -- 'cause they're not "direct marketing".

    Seeds don't cost much. And there is land everywhere, lawns, back yards, you name it. There's even a guy in Vancouver, Canada who has a profitable farm right on top of asphalt parking lots. Amazing.

    Let's say you're wildly successful with online marketing... would it hurt you much to spend some time getting to know your soil?

    You think online marketing is where it's at... imagine blending your marketing skill with a basic real product like carrots, kale, tomatoes, cabbage, etc.

    Just thinking.
    And thinking hard.
    Linwood
    THE GARDEN WAY books. INFORMATION products, is that one thing we are advocating now? Selling tools and info to the a gardener/farmer?

    One of my favorite direct response ads from the 40's, a tome on one acre gardening, known as the HAVE MORE PLAN, by Carolyn and Ed Robinson. And soon after Lyman Woods enters the picture. Most everyone who has ever tilled has heard of the TROY ROTOTILLER.

    So, 75 years later, THE HAVE MORE plan is alive and well.
    This link opens a PDF of the ad which ran, starting in 1947. Don't you think it could work today? Great stuff.

    http://www.infomarketingblog.com/ima...ng_Blog_49.pdf

    Anyhow, down in the rich muck of Hartville, OH, out on ol Swamp Road were two fruit and veggie stands, right across from each other, one was my Uncle Frank Yoder's place, and had a green house where he experimented. One thing, at the first of the year, because of a licensing deal for his incredible overflowing plants...five growers around the country paid his licensing fee of 30k to be able to propagate his plants. As I understood it, all of them had buyers lined up, mostly municipalities, who bought these things every year. So, starting the year out with 150k for a few cuttings isn't too shabby either.

    Anyhow, unlike several of you who took to the farm life, I was't keen on farming, nor was my dad, who grew up farming, and had family running working farms, where we would go to play, or as I like to remember it, forced childhood labor camps. HA!

    As for the tools to "miners", as they say, those guys selling PVC by the truck load to those of you building your water gardens, are making some dough too.

    My idea of NO TILL gardening is hiring the expert to give me the details of something, create a report or information and sell by remote means using whatever marketing skills I can muster or lease.

    I do appreciate you alls efforts, keep the fresh fruit and veggies coming, please.

    GordonJ
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

      THE GARDEN WAY books. INFORMATION products, is that one thing we are advocating now? Selling tools and info to the a gardener/farmer?

      One of my favorite direct response ads from the 40's, a tome on one acre gardening, known as the HAVE MORE PLAN, by Carolyn and Ed Robinson. And soon after Lyman Woods enters the picture. Most everyone who has ever tilled has heard of the TROY ROTOTILLER.

      So, 75 years later, THE HAVE MORE plan is alive and well.
      This link opens a PDF of the ad which ran, starting in 1947. Don't you think it could work today? Great stuff.

      http://www.infomarketingblog.com/ima...ng_Blog_49.pdf

      Anyhow, down in the rich muck of Hartville, OH, out on ol Swamp Road were two fruit and veggie stands, right across from each other, one was my Uncle Frank Yoder's place, and had a green house where he experimented. One thing, at the first of the year, because of a licensing deal for his incredible overflowing plants...five growers around the country paid his licensing fee of 30k to be able to propagate his plants. As I understood it, all of them had buyers lined up, mostly municipalities, who bought these things every year. So, starting the year out with 150k for a few cuttings isn't too shabby either.

      Anyhow, unlike several of you who took to the farm life, I was't keen on farming, nor was my dad, who grew up farming, and had family running working farms, where we would go to play, or as I like to remember it, forced childhood labor camps. HA!

      As for the tools to "miners", as they say, those guys selling PVC by the truck load to those of you building your water gardens, are making some dough too.

      My idea of NO TILL gardening is hiring the expert to give me the details of something, create a report or information and sell by remote means using whatever marketing skills I can muster or lease.

      I do appreciate you alls efforts, keep the fresh fruit and veggies coming, please.

      GordonJ

      DEAR GORDON...
      REGARDING THAT 1947 AD...
      the headline... was so clever...
      "THIS IS THE WAY I WANT TO LIVE THE REST OF MY LIFE"...
      NOW, note... he does not promise the moon, just hints at "benefits"...
      but if the goal is to be BELIEVABLE ... THIS is believable... that "this is the way I want to live the rest of my life"... it's believable that THAT is what he wants... now comes the CURIOSITY ... let's see what this guy this is all about, what this guy is going on about... let's see...
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      • Profile picture of the author KinneyJ2014
        Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

        DEAR GORDON...
        REGARDING THAT 1947 AD...
        the headline... was so clever...
        "THIS IS THE WAY I WANT TO LIVE THE REST OF MY LIFE"...
        NOW, note... he does not promise the moon, just hints at "benefits"...
        but if the goal is to be BELIEVABLE ... THIS is believable... that "this is the way I want to live the rest of my life"... it's believable that THAT is what he wants... now comes the CURIOSITY ... let's see what this guy this is all about, what this guy is going on about... let's see...

        Cowboys ain't easy to love and they're harder to hold.
        They'd rather give you a song than diamonds or gold.
        Lonestar belt buckles and old faded levis,
        And each night begins a new day.
        If you don't understand him, an' he don't die young,
        He'll prob'ly just ride away.

        Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
        Don't let 'em pick guitars or drive them old trucks.
        Let 'em be doctors and lawyers and such.
        Mamas don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
        'Cos they'll never stay home and they're always alone.
        Even with someone they love.

        Cowboys like smokey old pool rooms and clear mountain mornings,
        Little warm puppies and children and girls of the night.
        Them that don't know him won't like him and them that do,
        Sometimes won't know how to take him.
        He ain't wrong, he's just different but his pride won't let him,
        Do things to make you think he's right.

        Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
        Don't let 'em pick guitars or drive them old trucks.
        Let 'em be doctors and lawyers and such.
        Mamas don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
        'Cos they'll never stay home and they're always alone.
        Even with someone they love.

        Willie Hugh Nelson
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        • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
          Originally Posted by KinneyJ2014 View Post

          Cowboys ain't easy to love and they're harder to hold.
          They'd rather give you a song than diamonds or gold.
          Lonestar belt buckles and old faded levis,
          And each night begins a new day.
          If you don't understand him, an' he don't die young,
          He'll prob'ly just ride away.

          Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
          Don't let 'em pick guitars or drive them old trucks.
          Let 'em be doctors and lawyers and such.
          Mamas don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
          'Cos they'll never stay home and they're always alone.
          Even with someone they love.

          Cowboys like smokey old pool rooms and clear mountain mornings,
          Little warm puppies and children and girls of the night.
          Them that don't know him won't like him and them that do,
          Sometimes won't know how to take him.
          He ain't wrong, he's just different but his pride won't let him,
          Do things to make you think he's right.

          Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
          Don't let 'em pick guitars or drive them old trucks.
          Let 'em be doctors and lawyers and such.
          Mamas don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys.
          'Cos they'll never stay home and they're always alone.
          Even with someone they love.

          Willie Hugh Nelson Willie Nelson - "Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys" (Live at the US Festival, 1983) - YouTube



          I've heard the song, but not really, not till you posted the lyrics.

          Thanks buddy.

          You're a good egg.

          Linwood.
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  • Profile picture of the author itsmeizic
    One thing is certain, not everyone will be an online marketer, else we wont have food to eat again. Some people will be a farmer. All we need to do is look for a mechanized way to ease the stress of farmers.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
    RE: How to Make Money In Farming.


    Some of the guys who are doing it:

    Curtis Stone (Farms in the back yards of neighbors, makes over $100K per acre)
    Singing Frogs Farm (8 acres in northern California, makes about $100K per acre)
    Jean-Martin Fortier makes about $100K per acre in Quebec, Canada.

    Joel Salatin, mostly cattle, does about $4,000 per acre per year.

    Eliot Coleman, known as the grandfather of organic gardening.

    Bob Canard, does kind of "wild gardening".

    Greg Judy, has a method of cattle ranching, on land you don't own, getting started with someone else's cattle, getting paid to graze 'em... went from bankruptcy to owning-controlling 1,000 acres -- all cattle all the time.


    It's easy enough to predict: since bankers and their paper products have had their day in the sun... farmers and producers of real goods will also swing back from their down cycle and soon have their day in the sun.


    Everything moves in cycles.

    just thinkin'
    one cup
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    • Profile picture of the author Sebulba
      Hello,


      Back about 20 years ago now my wife and I used the Salatin Method to raise pasture broilers. We built our house with that money.


      At the same time we were avidly reading Stockman Grass Farmer and going to Alan Nation conferences and such.


      Great fun and great potential with the proper dedication and motivation.


      Seb



      Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

      RE: How to Make Money In Farming.


      Some of the guys who are doing it:

      Curtis Stone (Farms in the back yards of neighbors, makes over $100K per acre)
      Singing Frogs Farm (8 acres in northern California, makes about $100K per acre)
      Jean-Martin Fortier makes about $100K per acre in Quebec, Canada.

      Joel Salatin, mostly cattle, does about $4,000 per acre per year.

      Eliot Coleman, known as the grandfather of organic gardening.

      Bob Canard, does kind of "wild gardening".

      Greg Judy, has a method of cattle ranching, on land you don't own, getting started with someone else's cattle, getting paid to graze 'em... went from bankruptcy to owning-controlling 1,000 acres -- all cattle all the time.


      It's easy enough to predict: since bankers and their paper products have had their day in the sun... farmers and producers of real goods will also swing back from their down cycle and soon have their day in the sun.


      Everything moves in cycles.

      just thinkin'
      one cup
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  • Profile picture of the author webbie
    Interesting. I think a lot of farmers would be interested in this info since U.S. farm bankruptcies reached an eight-year high recently:
    https://twitter.com/cryptopolis_x/st...54533913792514
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    • Profile picture of the author Sebulba
      You would think..... Unfortunately most "Farmers" are too tied into the big input methods. Bigger tractors and machinery for example.


      It's sad, but growing up on a successful dairy farm in the 60's and 70's I know where farmers go when they need help, or something isn't working out. They go to their banker, their machinery salesman or their seed and fertilizer salesmen. Guess what their answers always include ..... More debt, bigger tractors and more chemicals. I just doesn't work.


      Now, with the internet their are more opportunities to learn other answers. i haven't been in that world since the advent of the internet, so i am not sure how much it is making an impact. Some, I assume withe the younger generation. Unfortunately they aren't the decision makers or holding the purse string in many situations.



      Just my observations,


      Seb



      Originally Posted by webbie View Post

      Interesting. I think a lot of farmers would be interested in this info since U.S. farm bankruptcies reached an eight-year high recently:
      https://twitter.com/cryptopolis_x/st...54533913792514
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  • Profile picture of the author Odahh
    Why look at it as being against the bankers .

    It Isa rise in demand for locally grown produce and the willingness of people to pay the price . At the same time in the last ten years the price of fast food and take out has gone up dramatically as minimum wages around the country get pushed up.

    So highly efficient and intensive opperational where with low machanical infrastructure that can achieve 40-80 percent margins or better where farmers are allowed to value add their produce though against the law in much of the country .

    We have had others threads and much of curtise stones 100k comes from microgreens but I think I have seen h state in the past a lot of the profit goes to his workers because his teaching business is much of his income.

    I have many farming channels on my YouTube.

    And in the last ten years many different methods have come to public attention regarding producing food .so you can chose the method and scale you prefer.

    Wait untill.people who grow produce can afford small delivery robot so they can profitable pickand pack produce and put it in the mini automated vehicle and send it to a waiting customer

    But as far as the hundred k mark if you are starting fresh with no money and no experience it could take several years to build up the skill the market and resources to not only make six fires but have a profit margin you can live on.
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  • Profile picture of the author smedia11
    I watched a bunch of Curtis Stone's videos on YouTube last year, almost convinced myself to sell everything and buy an acre or 2 of land and take up farming.

    I think the growing part is the easy part, its the marketing to sell all your produce locally that would be difficult.

    The method is not really scale-able beyond a few acres for that reason.
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    • Profile picture of the author Sebulba
      Definately! If we could have just focused on producing the natural beef and chicken that we were making and not had to market it we probably would have continued. We got burnt out constantly looking for avenues to sell at, going to farmers markets etc.


      Probably 5 times the time and effort needed to be put into marketing than producing.


      Seb





      Originally Posted by smedia11 View Post

      I watched a bunch of Curtis Stone's videos on YouTube last year, almost convinced myself to sell everything and buy an acre or 2 of land and take up farming.

      I think the growing part is the easy part, its the marketing to sell all your produce locally that would be difficult.

      The method is not really scale-able beyond a few acres for that reason.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
    The NO-TILL GROWERS can make about $100,000 or more off an acre of land, selling direct, and about half of that is profits and the other half pays for labor and other expenses.... but the COOL THING IS...

    One Acre Feeds About 100 Families with Veggies in A Year.


    Here is a short video about Jim Kovaleski... who farms in the front yard.. his neighbor's front yard. You don't need to "own" much land, land is everywhere.

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  • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
    THE POINT OF THIS THREAD (or ONE point) IS NOT TO "MAKE $100,000 A YEAR" BUT TO GET YOU TO SEE THAT "NATURE IS GENEROUS" AND IT HELPS TO TAKE CARE OF NATURE IN NATURE'S WAY.

    Below is a video of Will Harris who was going bankrupt on his farm, using chemical fertilizers to "make money"... but when he stopped THINKING about how to make more money, and instead started thinking "HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY SOIL TODAY"... then... success came his way. He became the biggest employer in his county.

    Check it out:



    He stopped buying chemical fertilizers and instead rotated his cows around OFTEN... so they would NOT eat the grass down to the dirt, and so they would poop and pee all over, not just in one place. Very important.

    Nature wants a little poop and pee all over.
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