What now for stores after the pandemic?

by WF- Enzo Administrator
20 replies
Right, so because most physical stores have switched to either kerbside delivery or pickup, and the pandemic is still a public health threat sans a vaccine, the new norm could be kerbside or store pickup.

That works for restaurants, but what about for, say IKEA?
#delivery #pandemic #stores
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  • Profile picture of the author Valentine1
    Cafes/Restaurants will be okay if they can survive at least 6-8 months without money imo.
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  • Profile picture of the author Annie Ezell
    Most of the industries now thinking to switch to eCommerce to survive, not possible for every industry will have to find an alternate way for atleast couple of years to gain customer attention and increase in revenue.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Retail stores will open soon, and people will shop wearing masks.

    I have a retail store that I re-opened last Monday. Business is slightly below normal, but easily survivable.

    The businesses that will have a tougher time are gyms and bars.
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    • Profile picture of the author WF- Enzo
      Administrator
      Yeah that's what I thought. Gold's Gym recently filed for bankruptcy, so there's that.

      Bars, I think, can adjust to selling their food to-go. But it'll be tough.

      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


      The businesses that will have a tougher time are gyms and bars.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by WF- Enzo View Post

        Yeah that's what I thought. Gold's Gym recently filed for bankruptcy, so there's that.
        As with many gyms, their online sales (including through Amazon and Walmart) and many of its franchises worldwide actually are now doing better than ever, with the home fitness craze transforming to home gyms and online fitness trainers. The bankruptcy protection is only affecting their company-owned physical locations.
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      • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
        Originally Posted by WF- Enzo View Post

        Yeah that's what I thought. Gold's Gym recently filed for bankruptcy, so there's that.

        Bars, I think, can adjust to selling their food to-go. But it'll be tough.
        The state of New Jersey just allowed Cocktail delivery this weekend. This could be a big help to save some bars and restaurants
        https://nypost.com/2020/05/16/new-je...tail-delivery/
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Many offices are running fine with telecommuting - and my guess is quite a few larger businesses may rethink their 'onsite' work habits. Why pay for office space - maintain parking lots - heat and cool large areas if it turns out workers are just as efficient from home?

    My daughter-in-law will be working from home at least until Fall - and maybe beyond that. She has online conferences/disussions daily with others in her division and said she is getting more done NOW becuase there are no interruptions.

    Some people won't have the space or quiet at home to do this but I do think this pandemic will move 'telecommuting' ahead in a big way.

    Retail stores are opening here - i think there might be some over control going on - the idea of limiting number of people in a store is probably a good one. Our groceries have always had disinfecting 'wipes' available at entries to clean cart handles. I always used them but now I see everyone using them.

    There are pluses for the public when stores are cleaning more frequently - wiping down display cases and counters and handles on a regular basis. i do think we are in the 'time' when people tend to over-react. I think it's your business if you wear a mask - it's not your business if someone else doesn't.


    I think the future of retail stores after this pandemic won't be obvious perhaps until the Christmas shopping season.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      I think the future of retail stores after this pandemic won't be obvious perhaps until the Christmas shopping season.
      The after Christmas markdowns are traditionally the best time for shoppers. This will perhaps be the last gasp for long-term struggling chains. Bargain hunters have also been trained for a very long time by merchants to wait for "closeouts" or "going out of business sales". This time around, it will be the real thing for many.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    Large numbers of retail outlets, including some of the big ones, were already doing poorly before the pandemic. Changes in consumer shopping to online has been an ongoing pattern over at least the past 15 years.

    The last recession in 2008 and again the current one has been nails in the coffins of thousands of businesses that failed to adapt.

    It appears a sound business model for retail is perhaps like Amazon and Walmart. They each have a robust physical and online presence with automation and technology for meeting current consumer demands and buying patterns.
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  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    I did some reading last week, and I was surprised to see that some of the logistics companies had their "last mile" of delivery (the most expensive) covered by independent contractors. I could be wrong, but I get the impression said contractors are responsible for their own routing (often done by hand). I was very surprised as I think corporate probably have resources to help them with this.

    It might be a very small window of opportunity?
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      Originally Posted by socialentry View Post

      I did some reading last week, and I was surprised to see that some of the logistics companies had their "last mile" of delivery (the most expensive) covered by independent contractors. I could be wrong, but I get the impression said contractors are responsible for their own routing (often done by hand). I was very surprised as I think corporate probably have resources to help them with this.

      It might be a very small window of opportunity?
      "some reading" LOL You did more than some. At a corporate level once the responsibility is handed over...it is exactly that - handed over. What happens from that point - they have zero percent concern with. UNLESS there is an issue. The resolution in such cases is last mile 3rd party guy saying "Sorry we will do better" or last mile 3rd party guy being replaced.

      The only Corporate logistics company that I can think of that puts "Routing" into the hands of last mile 3rd party guy is FedEx. Another example I just thought of is FedEx and UPS dropping off last mile to USPS - where they have their own kinda sorta routing system ( not really - but they get the job done )

      Let me give you a personal example of being last mile 3rd party guy. I do installs for Directv, Exceed, and Hughesnet. Other than giving me a "Job" that falls into a geographic area these 3 companies do nothing in the way of routing. They simply don't care.. they just want the job done. Forget the fact that the jobs given could require 500 miles of driving between jobs ( no Im not kidding )

      I do my routing by hand. I take the jobs from the 3 sources and geographically spread them across 3 crews. and in recent days I have been the fourth crew - because stuff is that spread out ( demand has been high during this period and only getting higher. )

      So to your point.. is there a demand for routing in the "last mile 3rd party guy" sector? and I would reply heck yeah there is. Ive looked, there is no "solutions" on the market that I have seen.
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  • Profile picture of the author George441
    I think there will be a kind of awareness among the people even after the epidemic is gone which will have an impact on the shops where both the shopkeepers and the customers will be aware.
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  • Profile picture of the author DURABLEOILCOM
    People will be shopping with gloves and masks much like what is going on at grocery stores. 6 feet distancing and limited amounts of customers in the store. What really need to come back fan free are the Sports leagues.
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    • Profile picture of the author steelhead
      Speaking of sports leagues returning. Have your considered for example minor league franchises of say baseball, basketball, football, etc. They do not have a cashflow source without fans. No TV contracts or at least TV contracts that could support a multi-million dollar nut that it takes to operate. So they will be GONE.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Simple truth - sports and the huge salaries paid - depend on the high entrance fees and on the commercial space sold.

    I don't see any way a 'spectator' sports iwll be as captivating online as it is in a stadium - but i'm not a huge sports fan. I've been at parties that revolve around watching football on TV so maybe it's possible....would enough people pay to watch televised/streaming games to make teams profitable or even sustainable?

    The "roar of the crowd" is a huge part of sports - even of televised sports. Sports betting is taking a huge hit - lot ot money being lost on many fronts in several major sports. This is one the businesses that will have challenges re-opening.

    Some stores like Neiman-Marcus have been teetering on the brink of closure for years...and this does them in. Macy's may be another one though Macy's customer service may keep them viable for a while longer. Penney's is another on the brink - they can't close many more stores without going out of business entirely.

    In nearby Cincinnati - restaurants are expanding into the sidewalks and into the streets. With the City's help, they are 'social distancing' their tables by taking over outside space to allow enough customers to maintain the business. Some small retailers may be able to do the same for the summer season.

    Social distancing is hard on any business that relies on a customer count such as restaurants, movie theaters, live theatre, concerts, etc. Will be interesting to see

    a) how businesses adapt to social distancing and manage to stay in business
    b) whether 'social distancing' is a flash in the pan that will be discarded before long
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  • Profile picture of the author prvegas
    Vegas will come back but it is going to take some real changes to the way we were. Casinos in Las Vegas will begin opening early June. Some restaurants are open now with limited seating. As stated prior gyms and bars will have a tough times and unfortunately so will Vegas shows and buffets.
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  • With online classes, I wonder how brick and mortar bookstores are going to survive this. It doesn't make sense to buy school supplies anymore. And it makes more sense for school book publishers to create and sell ebook copies directly to schools and students now than to course it through your neighborhood bookstore.
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  • Profile picture of the author jimin
    Banned
    Hey guys! How are you?
    i want to grow my business. But i am solo and i even do not have any experience in marketing?
    Can anyone suggest me off line marketing for tokyo ghoul touka cosplay
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  • We are getting groceries and essential products now. but still there are are so many things we need, like cloths (not party wear, regular wears). So if any cloths & garments company can offer the product deliveries with hygienic, it will be a good deal.
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  • Profile picture of the author leahgetty
    Businesses are moving to newer ways of working, that would've seemed unviable earlier. Many companies have adapted to WFH, and even I have been working from home for the past two months. I work in IT in a retail company, btw.

    But since several services require in-store visits, maintaining social distancing and hygiene has been the priority for store owners. Retail stores are opening and most have made it compulsory for customers to wear masks.

    Stores are more frequently sanitized now. The staff is trained accordingly. I talked to a store manager the other day and got to know about the steps they've taken. I was amazed when they mentioned how customers still argue about wearing masks in the store. They still find it difficult to manage large crowds. Walk-ins in large numbers increase the risk of crowding and hence contamination.

    I am still reconsidering whether I should visit the supermarket or not. is a good resource I found on another forum while searching for solutions to make stores safer. I feel it is uncertain when the situation will improve but I'd definitely recommend the store managers to take steps, or else, I'm definitely shopping online.

    I believe that the new normal is to accept that we have to change!
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    We are getting groceries and essential products now. but still there are are so many things we need, like cloths (not party wear, regular wears). So if any cloths & garments company can offer the product deliveries with hygienic, it will be a good deal.

    I don't understand comments like this - maybe it's regional. We have big dept stores that have been open all along and have clothing. But...Who can't go for 2 months without buying clothes?



    I think a lot of people are letting unreasonable fears limit them now. I'm going to the grocery in a few minutes. I'll wear a mask - if others don't it's none of my business. I'll keep my own distance from other people and not worry about their distancing. common sense goes a long way even in times like this
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    Due to the current pandemic I will no longer be shaking hands or giving hugs. You may wave, bow to me or give me the finger...your choice.

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