Do you list prices on your website? Why or why not?

10 replies
I list prices on my website, because I want to qualify for budget as soon as possible. I'd be interested in testing if I could sneak it into the initial email so my callbacks are that much more qualified.

What works for you?
#list #prices #website
  • Profile picture of the author myob
    I have always found it best to never give out the price until you have firmly established value to prospects in your presentation.

    You don't want prospects shopping on price. My prices are almost never the "lowest", but with the right positioning they can be shown to have extremely competitive value.

    In practice, I produce massive content in trade publications, news outlets, and niche-relevant blogs and websites about the product(s).

    Most of thes articles are often case studies and interviews with product users under wide varieties of cross-niche applications.

    The articles drive direct traffic to my website, with either a call to action to "call for best price", or a link to the affiliate link discount code.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612117].message }}
  • Originally Posted by Matthew North View Post

    I list prices on my website, because I want to qualify for budget as soon as possible. I'd be interested in testing if I could sneak it into the initial email so my callbacks are that much more qualified.

    What works for you?
    I list the prices, usually in the Q & A section.

    It's not what I recommend. The reason I do it is because I don't want to have to piitch over the phone. I only want to talk to people that are ready to buy.

    I'm missing sales by doing that. I'm aware of that. My reasons are personal rather than business.

    I wouldn't put your prices in an initial e-mail. When all they have to base a decision on is price, you'll lose. They can always find a lower price. Price comes up later, after interest is established and you are seen as an expert and authority in your subject.

    Of course, if you are selling nuts and bolts, price is really the main concern.
    Signature
    One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

    "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612234].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      Of course, if you are selling nuts and bolts, price is really the main concern.
      Even for "commodities", or products driven to rock bottom prices due to competition, justification for higher prices is generally better for brand positioning. People will pay more (often a whole lot more) for value-added service, convenience, or even a recognized name.

      Years ago, I made a killing by selling a container of imported "iPhones" from China. They weren't bad, but certainly not a real Apple product. I marketed them as "Guaranteed Genuine Counterfeits". That was long before I knew what I was doing, and the laws were not as stringent.

      Just by including bonuses such as iPhone case, packaging, satisfaction moneyback guarantee "certificate", and a color user guide, I sold out by promoting to mailing lists with a call to action: "Prices too low to advertise, call today!" People were expecting to pay much more than my offer even though it was available much cheaper elsewhere.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612241].message }}
      • Originally Posted by myob View Post


        Just by including bonuses such as iPhone case, packaging, satisfaction moneyback guarantee "certificate", and a color user guide, I sold out by promoting to mailing lists with a call to action: "Prices too low to advertise, call today!" People were expecting to pay much more than my offer even though it was available much cheaper elsewhere.
        Yup, a lesson for us all. Bundle selling adds value and diffuses the price. It's near impossible to comparison shop when you offer a bundle like this.

        I do it in my ads.
        Signature
        One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

        "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612244].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Matthew North
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          I
          I wouldn't put your prices in an initial e-mail. When all they have to base a decision on is price, you'll lose. They can always find a lower price. Price comes up later, after interest is established and you are seen as an expert and authority in your subject.
          After reading this I've taken the price out of the Q&A section, thank you.

          Originally Posted by myob View Post

          I marketed them as "Guaranteed Genuine Counterfeits". That was long before I knew what I was doing, and the laws were not as stringent.
          too good!

          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Yup, a lesson for us all. Bundle selling adds value and diffuses the price. It's near impossible to comparison shop when you offer a bundle like this.

          I do it in my ads.
          I was thinking about this last night. I've been toying with the idea of adding a blogging outreach service with what I offer. I could resell a service from another provider and bundle it as a package. Targeted, niche-specific backlinks to articles are hard for SMBs to build themselves unless they use a service like this, and it improve their article performance and overall authority of the website.
          Signature

          you cant hold no groove if you ain't got no pocket.

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612274].message }}
          • Originally Posted by Matthew North View Post

            I was thinking about this last night. I've been toying with the idea of adding a blogging outreach service with what I offer. I could resell a service from another provider and bundle it as a package. Targeted, niche-specific backlinks to articles are hard for SMBs to build themselves unless they use a service like this, and it improve their article performance and overall authority of the website.
            One of the normal rules in creating bundles is that, other than the main offer, most of the other parts of the bundle have a high perceived value, but a low cost to you...maybe no cost. Guarantees, consulting, extended warranties, instruction videos or booklets, Certificates Of Authenticity (I love that one) are common.


            By the way, a Certificate Of Authenticity merely means you printed something that says "This is really what I say it is".....that kills me.
            Signature
            One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

            "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612282].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Matthew North
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              One of the normal rules in creating bundles is that, other than the main offer, most of the other parts of the bundle have a high perceived value, but a low cost to you...maybe no cost. Guarantees, consulting, extended warranties, instruction videos or booklets, Certificates Of Authenticity (I love that one) are common.


              By the way, a Certificate Of Authenticity merely means you printed something that says "This is really what I say it is".....that kills me.
              In that case, how about a bundle that includes

              Keyword research
              Images, artwork, custom formatting, internal links to other articles to increase pageviews/SEO
              Competitive analysis
              Articles published for you in the CMS (concierge service)
              Distribution service through high follower accounts on social media
              Branded reports on keywords, competition, viral articles in their niche

              Some ideas I had so far.
              Signature

              you cant hold no groove if you ain't got no pocket.

              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612302].message }}
              • Originally Posted by Matthew North View Post

                In that case, how about a bundle that includes

                Keyword research
                Images, artwork, custom formatting, internal links to other articles to increase pageviews/SEO
                Competitive analysis
                Articles published for you in the CMS (concierge service)
                Distribution service through high follower accounts on social media
                Branded reports on keywords, competition, viral articles in their niche

                Some ideas I had so far.
                Keyword research
                Images, artwork, custom formatting, internal links to other articles to increase pageviews/SEO
                Competitive analysis
                Articles published for you in the CMS (concierge service)

                You need to make these things sound like benefits.

                Competitive analysis may mean a lot to you, but it doesn't make the prospect's heart beat faster. How about "We search your competitors and find ways to profit for you, that they couldn't see" (Not great, but I hope you get the idea.)

                Keyword research? What does the prospect get out of that. You're just describing work. How does the keyword research make them money, and bring in customers?

                A good idea is to hire a script writer here (Not me), or a copywriter. They can get the list to sing the prospect's favorite song.
                Signature
                One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

                "Be kind. For everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle".....Ian Maclaren
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612303].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author deu12000
    I do not list prices in general. I do list prices for special offers or promotions though. Everything else there really isn't a way to list the price since offers are completely customized to the client. Even for hourly billing I have a range and it depends on how hard/annoying I think a project will be.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11612850].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    I'm obviously a bit late to this conversation but do have something to add. I've had a website since the mid-90's and have tried it all sorts of ways when it comes to prices posted and not posted. Here's what I ultimately found, in a nutshell. Take whatever applies and works for you:

    Posting price works well when you're a bargain. Price acts as an attractant. Low price attracts. High price usually repels. Price acts in this way when a prospective customer is doing their initial research which is different than the way they think about price after they've been sold.

    It often doesn't matter what they think their budget is. Budgets are created,manufactured. The result of doing some math. Or, very often, based on what they've done before or what they heard should be the going rate. And so, budgets can be changed. If that weren't true, we'd all be driving the cheapest car and wearing the cheapest clothes and only one guy would get all the work. Besides, if you ask, they'll tell you the least they want to spend, usually. Not the highest they're willing to go if you're worth it.

    So, as I said, some prefer being bargain priced because it's easier to bring in business. To them, I'd say, being bargain priced your whole career will not be sustainable in all likelihood. Your needs and wants change. They can increase. Things happen! Cost of living goes up. Cost of doing business goes up. And so,if you rely on a sweet price to bring in business, sooner or later that price may have to go up. Then, it won't be so attractive,if at all. And then what will you do? You need to know how to bring in business despite the higher price. You need to be able to convert inquiries to sales despite the higher price. And you can't afford to wait until it's a problem to learn how to do it. So, why not just start now?

    Not posting prices also creates a need for the potential client to contact you for that information, where then you can take control of the conversation and convert it to an appointment, sale or whatever the goal is. That's a good thing,isn't it? Those who post prices are essentially enabling the website visitor to believe they have all the info they need and then they go off to simply shop for best price.

    I've also found this, which should be interesting to any who post price believing it to ward off price shoppers: Real price shoppers HATE when there's no price posted. They absolutely detest that so much that they will refuse to do business with that site as a matter of principle. They *imagine* the price isn't posted because you must be "expensive," whatever "expensive" may mean in their mind, anyway. They don't want to speak with you, even to get basic information. Who wants those people anyway? Not me! They're showing price is paramount to them over value, as opposed to those who are value-oriented. The value-oriented shopper may be intrigued by how you present your stuff, may be interested some, but doesn't see a price. So they inquire. It may turn out they can't afford you, but that's not because they're price shopping. Those who can afford you, now you can sell them.

    You see, NOT posting prices can shoo away the price-sensitive and bring in the value-oriented.

    There's always one or two people who'll say, "well, I'm not a price shopper - I have an expensive car and dine out all the time in the best restaurants blah blah, but I wouldn't do business without seeing a price first and so I have prices on my site!" but keep in mind, they're merely telling you how THEY themselves shop. So they're signaling that they may not be a price shopper when it comes to their car and shoes and things they personally indulge in, but as regards what YOU offer, they actually are price sensitive, because they're obviously putting on "price shopping" ways. What they tell you about themselves doesn't align with that shopping behavior, you see. Yet the way they personally shop doesn't mean anything anyway because they're not representative of the entire marketplace. And to believe the marketplace shops like you would, personally, would be a mistake to believe.

    Did I leave anything out?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11614085].message }}

Trending Topics