Book Review and The Only Objection That Really Exists

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Just read this book by Babe Kilgore-
Non-confrontational Sales: A Modern Sales Guide To Rapidly Improving In-Home Sales.

It focuses on in-home sales and has a chapter or two on telesales as well. I thought it was very good and picked up a couple of tips.

The author talks about what he calls "push" (confrontational) words and "pull" (non-confrontational) words.

The book focuses on pulling the prospect gently in the direction of the close by using verbal, body language, and tonality patterns to maintain a positive non-pushy presence and by adding to their "emotional bank account".

I also liked how he described the only objection that really exists. It's this:
"Based on what you told me and how you have made me feel, I haven't heard enough information or understood enough information, to get me feeling more positively about you and your services, than feeling negatively about them."

I thought it was pretty good and I've never seen it mentioned anywhere. I stumbled across it on Amazon.
#book #exists #objection #review
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

    Just read this book by Babe Kilgore-
    Non-confrontational Sales: A Modern Sales Guide To Rapidly Improving In-Home Sales.

    It focuses on in-home sales and has a chapter or two on telesales as well. I thought it was very good and picked up a couple of tips.

    The author talks about what he calls "push" (confrontational) words and "pull" (non-confrontational) words.

    The book focuses on pulling the prospect gently in the direction of the close by using verbal, body language, and tonality patterns to maintain a positive non-pushy presence and by adding to their "emotional bank account".

    I also liked how he described the only objection that really exists. It's this:
    "Based on what you told me and how you have made me feel, I haven't heard enough information or understood enough information, to get me feeling more positively about you and your services, than feeling negatively about them."

    I thought it was pretty good and I've never seen it mentioned anywhere. I stumbled across it on Amazon.
    I bought the book because you mentioned it, and because it was on the subject of direct selling.

    I got half way through it and threw it away. I'm not joking. It's the only sales book I ever threw away.

    And then I got to think about it, and thought I was missing something, and went to the trash, took the book out, wiped it off, and finished reading it.

    And then I threw it away again.

    I decided not to leave a review on Amazon, because I have nothing to gain by trashing the author.

    But this book was just a rehash of what is in every single book on selling. It's precisely like the author read ten books on selling, and then just rewrote what he had read. I learned nothing about how the author thought.

    Anyway...there are far better books on selling out there. I can recommend a few if you like. (I mean books besides mine).
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    • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
      LOL you thought it was that bad!? I haven't read as many as you... so maybe that's why I thought it was good. I bought it because of the in-home selling aspect too. One thing I picked up and have used when "I have to talk to the wife" -

      I ask what do you think she'll say?
      They'll respond with, I don't know.
      Then I say, "if you had to guess?"
      Then they tell me their concern. They make it sound like it's hers, but that's a cover up. It's theirs.

      Now that may have been in other books, I just haven't seen it. Or I forgot.

      And yes, please recommend some others!

      added - I'm also glad that you bought the printed version of the book. I'd feel guilty if you cracked the screen on your Kindle during your fit of rage
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      • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
        Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

        I ask what do you think she'll say?
        They'll respond with, I don't know.
        Then I say, "if you had to guess?"
        Then they tell me their concern. They make it sound like it's hers, but that's a cover up. It's theirs.
        The sale was dead when you asked the same question twice in one go. Best to skip the question, make the prospect feel they are in control and rephrase the question in a way that fits the prospects persona. That is the art of a one-on-one sales pitch that you as a salesman have or not.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

        LOL you thought it was that bad!? I haven't read as many as you... so maybe that's why I thought it was good. I bought it because of the in-home selling aspect too. One thing I picked up and have used when "I have to talk to the wife" -

        I ask what do you think she'll say?
        They'll respond with, I don't know.
        Then I say, "if you had to guess?"
        Then they tell me their concern. They make it sound like it's hers, but that's a cover up. It's theirs.
        First, it isn't really their concern. The author made it up. He simply doesn't know...But it sounds good, so it goes in the book. Lots of what he wrote is the same...it sounds good, like it should work. But in actual practice, it doesn't. That's how you know when someone is just rewriting other people's material...And...most sales authors have never sold anything in their life. For example, nearly every sales speaker and guru selling sales courses...has never sold anything their life. Highly successful salespeople generally stick with selling, only writing books after decades of actual selling.

        Here are a couple of truths about "I have to talk to my wife/husband".

        In the beginning, they may tell you that they make the financial decisions. But they tell you that because they are just gathering information....and it never occurs to them that they may actually want what you sell.

        Then after your presentation...they find that they actually want it, but the reality crashes in on them that they really need to talk to their spouse, because they would get crucified if they bought on their own.

        You cannot over come the objection about talking to their spouse. You have to avoid the situation in the first place. That's how you handle it.

        I speak from decades of experience in personal selling, training hundreds of salespeople, and closing thousands of their sales over the phone. No matter what they tell you in the beginning, they won't buy without the spouse there.

        In my life, I have closed 2 sales with the wife by themselves. Both times, they were rich, and owned their own companies.

        I suggest you read books written by actual salespeople who made sales for decades.

        Of course, I recommend you study my books (and anything I've written on sales, my blog Claudesblog.com might be useful to you.

        But the good news is that selling doesn't change because human nature doesn't change.

        Influence by Robert Cialdini

        How To Master The Art Of Selling by Tom Hopkins. (The first great book on selling I ever read)

        Selling Retail by John Lawhon

        Spin Selling Neil Rackham (You'll get all the questions you need to ask. Highly recommended)

        The Way Of The Wolf by Jordon Belfort (A $3,000 seminar in book form)

        How To Make Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie (A classic that is essential reading)


        For about $100, you can have a fantastic education by real experts in how to sell.
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        • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          For about $100, you can have a fantastic education by real experts in how to sell.
          Why spend $100 when we have you.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

            Why spend $100 when we have you.
            First, thank you for the compliment.

            Second, the real value is in learning while doing. I won't always be here, I don't have every answer.

            For example, Misterme is at least as good as I am, and probably better. There are a few others, and we mostly stay in the Offline forum.
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            • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre
              For about $100, you can have a fantastic education by real experts in how to sell.

              Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

              Why spend $100 when we have you.

              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              First, thank you for the compliment.

              Second, the real value is in learning while doing. I won't always be here, I don't have every answer.

              For example, Misterme is at least as good as I am, and probably better. There are a few others, and we mostly stay in the Offline forum.
              Now you've gone and done it.. the Offline Forum is going to cost us $100 to partake in the best of the Warrior Forum.
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            • Profile picture of the author misterme
              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              Well now!

              Do you remember how it worked, or which book it was in?
              I sure do!

              Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

              Misterme is at least as good as I am, and probably better. .
              Thank you humbly.

              Oh, to add to my first reply above, I read two of Bosworth's books, they're on what he calls "solution selling." One book appeared to be a rehash of the other book, where the other book was really good, but the rehash was not.

              I believe he worked with Neil Rackham, so his selling ideas are similar to Rackham's, but I think I'm attributing the technique correctly to Bosworth. The prospect at the end of the inquiry says "I have to speak to my spouse" so Bosworth will ask something like, "and what would you say would be the thing they're most concerned about?"

              So, now let's imagine the prospect replies with "the cost." So Bosworth would have you then ask, "and based on what we've discussed how would you answer that?" Now you listen to see what they say. Do they explain it as the salesperson explained it or do they default to blurting out the price outright, like most people would?

              Bosworth would then have you coach the prospect by making suggestions, such as, "remember how I explained how our widget costs less to maintain then our competitors, so it ends up being only half as much? Would it help to explain that to him?" "Yes." "How would you explain that to him?" The idea being you're getting the prospect to practice the word track, being able to make sure the prospect has it right, and get it into their muscle memory.

              If Bosworth didn't teach that tactic about rehearsing the prospect to speak with the spouse, then it was me who took one of his ideas and converted it to that use, now that I think about it...
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by misterme View Post

                I believe he worked with Neil Rackham, so his selling ideas are similar to Rackham's, but I think I'm attributing the technique correctly to Bosworth. The prospect at the end of the inquiry says "I have to speak to my spouse" so Bosworth will ask something like, "and what would you say would be the thing they're most concerned about?"

                So, now let's imagine the prospect replies with "the cost." So Bosworth would have you then ask, "and based on what we've discussed how would you answer that?" Now you listen to see what they say. Do they explain it as the salesperson explained it or do they default to blurting out the price outright, like most people would?

                Bosworth would then have you coach the prospect by making suggestions, such as, "remember how I explained how our widget costs less to maintain then our competitors, so it ends up being only half as much? Would it help to explain that to him?" "Yes." "How would you explain that to him?" The idea being you're getting the prospect to practice the word track, being able to make sure the prospect has it right, and get it into their muscle memory.

                If Bosworth didn't teach that tactic about rehearsing the prospect to speak with the spouse, then it was me who took one of his ideas and converted it to that use, now that I think about it...
                That sounds like making the best of a very bad situation. I can see if they are coming to you, and only one shows up, you have to try to train the person to deliver your best points.


                I do sort of the same thing in the store, when only one shows up. But they are just there to gather information or browse.

                I would give my best presentation, and they would say "Off course I have to talk to my husband first"

                My first response is "I understand, I wish every person would talk it over first. Would you like to use our phone to call him, since you're already here?"

                Amazingly, about a third just call and the husband says "I don't care". And they buy.

                But if they hesitate,. I give them a product sheet (it has a photo of the machine and all the features listed). I give them a list of reasons to buy from us. They get the price, and I send them on their way.

                I'm not joking. About 70% come back and buy. I think one reason they come back is because we offer a list of services they cannot get anywhere else. I also asked them their budget, so the vacuum I show them isn't way out of their price range.

                But in the home? When I made an appointment, or am cold calling? They both have to be there, no matter what. It's too easy for me to just go to the next door.


                By the way, Now I'll have to dig out my old copy of Solution Selling, and see what got you so excited.
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                • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
                  Claude,

                  When's the last time you did door to door or in-home sales for vacuums? (I know you've done small biz advertising).

                  Do you think it would be harder today than days past? Do you think not much has changed?

                  That would be really fun to see you make a new post about! Maybe a week or even just a couple days worth of hitting houses.

                  I know you may be too busy to bother. It would be interesting to see your take on how things have changed though.

                  One thing that's interesting... and I have no frame of reference since I'm so new to it --face masks with in-home sales. I feel even more like a stranger if they request that I leave it on. Most tell me it's okay to remove it. But we always arrive and approach the door wearing a mask.
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                  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                    Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

                    Claude,

                    When's the last time you did door to door or in-home sales for vacuums? (I know you've done small biz advertising).

                    Do you think it would be harder today than days past? Do you think not much has changed?
                    How long ago was it that I knocked on a consumer's door cold? Almost 20 years. For the last ten years I sold in people's homes, I didn't cold call at all. It was all past customers (thousands of them), and referrals from those customers. There was no need to cold call at all. The only time I cold called was a few days to test an approach I wanted to try out. Or a few times to show someone how to do it.

                    And it's been about ten years since I sold in people's home. And about 4 years since I sold to businesses in their office. Right now, we just run a retail store (doing very well), and doing some writing. We'll close the store, or sell it in a year or so.

                    About selling in people's homes changing over the years...... it's not any harder to get a lead, make an appointment, or make a sale. The main change is that you can now generate leads online, and that's a difference. But people are still buying as much as ever. People are still spending every dime they make. People still love to buy.



                    Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

                    One thing that's interesting... and I have no frame of reference since I'm so new to it --face masks with in-home sales. I feel even more like a stranger if they request that I leave it on. Most tell me it's okay to remove it. But we always arrive and approach the door wearing a mask.
                    Yeah, I wondered how much it would affect sales. My advice is the keep on the mask.. I wear mine all the time I'm talking to a buyer. It doesn't hurt sales...whether they are wearing a mask or not.

                    I'd wear a mask in front of anyone. Why? Because if you get Covid...even if you show no symptoms...that's the end of your sales career for the foreseeable future.
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        • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
          Thanks Claude,

          I've read some of those. I've have all of yours as well. I'll check out the ones I haven't read yet. I just re-read Influence last week. I do think the writer of this book I mentioned, uses some of Belfort's 'Straight Line' talk. He just put his own spin on it - "gently pushing or pulling the prospect away from and to the sale".
          I did notice that.

          I've heard this referred to as "circular learning" - hearing the same thing multiple times in different ways and picking up new things each time. The same with the way he framed what he called the only real objection. I already understood the concept, but hadn't seen it summed up that way.

          I was under the impression that there is nothing new about sales. Just different ways to explain it.

          I'm currently reading The Unfair Advantage. It kept popping up on my suggestions list, because I already had yours. This one is about NLP.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

            I was under the impression that there is nothing new about sales. Just different ways to explain it.
            There is nothing new in sales, just different levels of understanding.

            Most of these authors don't understand how selling works, at all.

            When they read something that sounds clever, they repeat it, often with different language.

            The problem is, they didn't understand the idea in the first place, so their re-writing it has no basis in knowledge.

            And, I don't want to offend you...but with only a few weeks in sales, you cannot possibly know the difference between a great technique and spiffy nonsense. All techniques sound equally good, when you're new.

            Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

            I'm currently reading The Unfair Advantage. It kept popping up on my suggestions list, because I already had yours. This one is about NLP.
            I read the book. I also read several other books on selling, using NLP.

            They all have one thing in common, none of the authors ever sold anything in their lives.

            All of them are written by NLP students who are trying to fit NLP into another subject, like selling.

            Before you spend your time reading any sales book in the future, always find out about the person who wrote it.

            If they are a "Management consultant" they often have never sold anything in their lives.

            If they are a speaker, and write a book about selling, they are rehashing whatever they think is current...or popular. They have also never sold anything in their lives.

            Psychologists and NLP people have never sold anything, although Influence is a useful book because the concepts are thoroughly tested before they are presented.

            Read books on selling, written by people who spent decades as a top salesperson.
            It's there that you'll find reality. What really works, and why.

            I have read over 2,500 books on selling, psychology, how the mind works, marketing, advertising, and copywriting.

            Of all the books on selling, maybe 20 are worth anything.
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            • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
              Circular learning - I meant that's true with everything, not just sales. Seeing and hearing information in different ways will give different 'light bulb' moments. I enjoy psychology too. I'm not impressed with the NLP book I mentioned so far. I've seen these things mentioned elsewhere and have never been certain how much of NLP was just pseudoscience. I will almost always give things a shot though if they pique my interest.

              I have a couple years in sales. And not full-time. They've been side hustles. So I'm still new. But I'm completely new to in-home sales. That's the main reason I got the book.
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

                Circular learning - I meant that's true with everything, not just sales. Seeing and hearing information in different ways will give different 'light bulb' moments.
                You aren't reading correct information written in different ways.

                You are either reading correct information, re-written without a full understanding (which means it's now bad information), or bad information said in a different way.

                There is a huge difference between having a different way of saying something, and just being wrong. Many of these authors are repeating incorrect information, because they don't know better.

                For example, most answers to objections you read in books are unworkable. They sound clever, so the author assumes they work. But these are very different from the answers given by experienced salespeople who have written a book on selling.

                For example, Grant Cardone has written several sales books. Some are pretty good, and give real advice.

                But he has one titled The Closer's Survival Guide that is a few hundred pages of one liners that sound clever.

                My guess is that nobody has ever used one of these lines successfully. They aren't answers to objections...or even closes...just clever one liners that someone assembled under his name.

                There are tons of books like that. Some are even expensive courses.

                To a trained ear, these 'techniques" scream "I don't know how to sell, but wanted to write a book on selling".

                But to most people, even some experienced salespeople, they sound like clever ways to answer objections.

                Added later; And that is a trap. And I have done this myself in decades past.

                I read an answer to an objection, or a closing statement/question that sound good...and I try it out.

                The trap is...sometimes the people buy. The mistaken idea now is that the "technique" worked. When the truth is they were going to buy anyway. But in the salesperson's mind "That technique worked. it got me the sale".

                And so they use it over and over again. But now it doesn't work. it actually hurts the sale. And discovering the cause can take quite a lot of time.

                I know this because I've hired and trained hundreds o salespeople. Usually, they make few sales the first several months. Then I go with them to see what they are doing. There are almost always things they are doing, unknown to them, that are killing any chance of a sale...and they are only closing the people who are desperate to buy, no matter what the salesperson does.

                I have only found one cure for that. Going with a top salesperson and watching them sell. And then they go with you, and watch you sell. And then they pick apart everything you did wrong, that you were unaware of.

                And then, after you improve your sales, and have some money....you spend a day with a better salesperson...and go up the ladder.

                In your business, possibly in your company...there is a superstar salesperson. When you have the funds, find that person, pay to travel, and spend a day with them. Believe me, your ambition will impress them enough that they will welcome the chance to pass on what they know.

                Even my first couple of years selling vacuum cleaners in people's homes, my biggest leaps in income came from spending a day with a top salesperson, watching what they do, and asking questions (after you are away from the customers). You will be astounded at how quickly you will advance. Even spending a day with salespeople outside your industry.....you'll be amazed at what you pick up.

                But I would suggest waiting at least 6 months, and get some money in the bank. Right now, you need sales.

                Me? I would ask your manager to describe your typical buyer; Income, home value, age, location, maybe which buyer's jobs gets more sales. (in my business, teachers were less likely to buy).

                That information is available. Then you put out flyers on doors that offer your bulbs for "a free solar power analysis and quotation". Give the bulbs a retail value. Make the appointments. Get busy.

                Someone in your business is probably doing this exact thing right now. Is there a trade journal in your business? magazines? If there are, get a pile of back issues and read them.

                Anyway, I hope your head doesn't explode.
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                • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
                  Just saw the parts you added later. I've heard it called "casino luck", or something like that. The "technique" works once, so you keep using it.
                  You win at the slot machine once, so you keep coming back.

                  I made two new appts yesterday. I didn't have the bulbs yet, so I was just hanging out flyers I made. I have a few appts from the company this week as well. They're already very happy to see I am making my own appts though.

                  I like the idea of actually traveling to watch somebody who is a "superstar". I've read on forums about guys that make 300-500k a year. But I would need to be sure they're legit. I have followed my team leader to 4 or 5 appts. I plan on following him again soon after I've had more myself.

                  I'm unaware of any trade journals, but I've yet to check. I'm sure there's something. I've only even been remotely interested in this industry for just under a month. I had never done in-home sales and wanted to try.

                  By the way, I appreciate your time responding and everyone else's time as well.

                  Edit: also, I do have our typical buyer profile. It's middle aged men, upper middle class, and additional criteria we've pinpointed. We spoke about that in the car during training.
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                  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                    Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

                    I like the idea of actually traveling to watch somebody who is a "superstar". I've read on forums about guys that make 300-500k a year. But I would need to be sure they're legit. I have followed my team leader to 4 or 5 appts. I plan on following him again soon after I've had more myself.
                    You could go with a few experienced reps. At your stage of the game, anyone that's making a good living could teach you something.

                    Wait until you have 6 months of solid sales before you try to call one of the guys making $300,000 or more a year. That way, what they tell you, what you see them do, will make more sense to you.
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                    • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
                      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

                      You could go with a few experienced reps. At your stage of the game, anyone that's making a good living could teach you something.

                      Wait until you have 6 months of solid sales before you try to call one of the guys making $300,000 or more a year. That way, what they tell you, what you see them do, will make more sense to you.
                      Great Advise!
                      The guys that make the big bucks are more than likely familiar with a theory called The Peter Principle wherein "A person reaches their own level of incompetence."
                      Here is good vid that explains it nicely.
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                      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                        Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

                        Great Advise!
                        The guys that make the big bucks are more than likely familiar with a theory called The Peter Principle wherein "A person reaches their own level of incompetence."
                        Here is good vid that explains it nicely.
                        Quite a lot of what I learned was going with top reps from different industries. In fact, very little of what I eventually put into practice did I learn from my core industry.

                        But I wouldn't recommend that to anyone without several years of real sales experience.

                        The trick is to see what processes they use, the structure of the techniques. You are looking for core principles that you can translate into your business. Sometimes you can pick up something that changes your entire business.
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    • Profile picture of the author JPs copy
      I DID throw out one sales book that I know of. I think it was called "Cold Calling Techniques: That really work!. It was extremely awful
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

    I also liked how he described the only objection that really exists. It's this:


    "Based on what you told me and how you have made me feel, I haven't heard enough information or understood enough information, to get me feeling more positively about you and your services, than feeling negatively about them."
    In other words.. you have not shown me anything verifiable that would justify my vested interest.


    Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

    I thought it was pretty good and I've never seen it mentioned anywhere. I stumbled across it on Amazon.
    That may be a strong indicator that the works is rehashed and done very bad at that.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    I ask what do you think she'll say?
    They'll respond with, I don't know.
    Then I say, "if you had to guess?"
    Then they tell me their concern. They make it sound like it's hers, but that's a cover up. It's theirs.
    Gawrsh, does that bring back memories!

    If memory serves, I think it was Michael Bosworth, in one of his sales books, who suggested you rehearse the prospect to speak with her spouse in a way that overcomes the objection. The prospect isn't aware you're doing this, as it's conversational.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by misterme View Post

      Gawrsh, does that bring back memories!

      If memory serves, I think it was Michael Bosworth, in one of his sales books, who suggested you rehearse the prospect to speak with her spouse in a way that overcomes the objection. The prospect isn't aware you're doing this, as it's conversational.
      Well now!

      Do you remember how it worked, or which book it was in?
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    • Profile picture of the author JPs copy
      There's a really good book called Spin Selling that addresses when your contact has to get another decision-maker involved. I didn't know this was a challenge until I saw it in-person and it was horrifying.

      I was consulting with the GM of a local sign store. When he called his father into our meeting, what he was trying to tell his Dad was so different than what I just told him, I was surprised I still walked away with a purchase order.
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  • Profile picture of the author JPs copy
    A few years ago I went down the YouTube rabbit hole with Jordan Belfort's videos (Wolf of wall street guy).

    I was fully expecting him to give his group secret one-liners to push prospects along.

    As it turns out, most of his content was about vocal tonality and how to harness it. Since then it's worked wonders for me since I can get kinda tone deaf.

    I DID throw out one sales book that I know of. I think it was called "Cold Calling Techniques: That really work!. It was extremely awful

    There's a really good book called Spin Selling that addresses when your contact has to get another decision-maker involved. I didn't know this was a challenge until I saw it in-person and it was horrifying.

    I was consulting with the GM of a local sign store. When he called his father into our meeting, what he was trying to tell his Dad was so different than what I just told him, I was surprised I still walked away with a purchase order.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by JPs copy View Post

      A few years ago I went down the YouTube rabbit hole with Jordan Belfort's videos (Wolf of wall street guy).

      I was fully expecting him to give his group secret one-liners to push prospects along.

      As it turns out, most of his content was about vocal tonality and how to harness it. Since then it's worked wonders for me since I can get kinda tone deaf.
      Belfort's system is a long series of points he makes about selling, mostly over the phone. If you like, you can buy his entire sales system on E-Bay for $10-$25.

      Here's a link;
      https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...+line&_sacat=0



      Originally Posted by JPs copy View Post

      I DID throw out one sales book that I know of. I think it was called "Cold Calling Techniques: That really work!. It was extremely awful
      Believe it or not, that's one of my favorite books on Cold Calling. It was written by Stephen Schiffman. And he used the exact techniques in the book to generate thousands of sales appointments for himself.

      I took a few ideas out of the book myself and used them pretty much as is. Everyone as a style, a personality...that certain approaches resonate with. Schiffman's cold calling dialog resonated with my personality, and it didn't with yours. It just means that there are many roads to making a sale.

      I bought the rest of Schiffman's books, and none of them were that good. At least to me.


      Originally Posted by JPs copy View Post

      There's a really good book called Spin Selling that addresses when your contact has to get another decision-maker involved. I didn't know this was a challenge until I saw it in-person and it was horrifying.
      Spin Selling is one of the best books ever written on selling, especially to business owners. It gives a complete map for what questions to ask everywhere along the line.

      And Yup...often there is another decision maker you weren't aware of. There is an awful lot to prepare for when selling a decent high ticket offer. It takes decades to learn every facet of selling on your own.
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    Don't claim to be as good of a salesman as Claude or some of the others but I'll say this...

    I sold cars and did pretty good... Was promoted to sales manager where I just closed deals all day. Was back in the 80s and the car business has changed but what worked for me was always just assuming the sale. I would go in and give them a 24, 36 and 48 month payment and just flipped the paper around and ask which one worked. I knew most all of them would want a lower payment so I would simply wait and if they balked tell them I could stretch it to 60 or 72 months. Usually worked.

    When you say in home sales I'm assuming you mean door to door?

    I talked to one of the best door to door salesman a few months ago. He was doing 3 to 5 appointments a day while the rest of the team was usually lucky to get 1.

    Won't say the company he was with, but I asked him how he did it and I thought he had a pretty good script... And would work for most.

    His went like this...

    Let's say it was a pressure washing company... It wasn't but it would work...

    Knock knock

    Hi I'm bob with xyz. Wanted to give you a heads up you'll prob see a couple of our trucks in the neighborhood this week. We're powerwashing some of your neighbors drives and sidewalks. Since we're in the area we can schedule you on Wednesday at 2 or 4. What time works for you?

    I'm paraphrasing off the top of my head... Because I don't remember the exact words... But the point I'm trying to make is this...

    He didn't ask if they were interested or what they thought or anything. It was a simple straight to the point of do you want this or not.

    There weren't any appointments in the area yet but he was selling on social proof.

    Wasn't powerwashing but I'm using that as an example.

    Just my thoughts but I thought it was genius.

    I'm a firm believer that a salesman will sell more when they assume the customer is ready to buy... But, like I said I don't claim to be all knowing on this... Only speaking from my experience light years ago
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    • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
      There's door to door involved with what I'm doing. But it's for lead generation. I'm in the solar industry.

      I bet the guy you talked to was a bug guy! If I was doing power washing, landscaping, window cleaning or pest control I'd give that a shot.

      For solar I want them to actually be interested since I have a presentation to give. I can't assume the sale at the door. I could try assuming the appointment though.
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      • Profile picture of the author max5ty
        Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

        There's door to door involved with what I'm doing. But it's for lead generation. I'm in the solar industry.

        I bet the guy you talked to was a bug guy! If I was doing power washing, landscaping, window cleaning or pest control I'd give that a shot.

        For solar I want them to actually be interested since I have a presentation to give. I can't assume the sale at the door. I could try assuming the appointment though.
        Isn't it pretty much free to start the solar thing?

        Was reading something about it and it sounded like the government pays people to start.

        Anyways, there's a Facebook group for door to door and some of them do solar. You might want to check it out.

        Hope you do good at it... Sure you will cause I've read some of your posts before and you're obviously not dumb about marketing
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        • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
          Thank you! And if you saw the numbers you'd be amazed. The first guy I closed said, "Who says NO to this!?"

          I told him the main problem was people not being qualified due to their credit or house being too old. The second hurdle was people thinking it's too good to be true. ( he jokingly said a couple times, "alright I'm trying to figure out where I'm getting screwed here.")

          The tax rebates pay for about half the system cost. You even get no first year payments, no interest, nothing down. That's so you can file taxes and get the rebates to throw at the principle of the loan. But you have to qualify to get the 40k loan, FIRST. And that's where people get tripped up. I lost two sales recently because they were denied during the loan process.

          It kills me, because the total payments are lower than what they're currently paying each month for electricity. They just can't qualify for that lump sum up front. I've been trying to come up with workarounds for that, but each solution is complicated.

          Thanks for the Facebook recommendation too. I hate Facebook and deleted my personal page years ago. But you can't deny how much networking and marketing goes on, so I have a profile I use now to check out groups like the one you suggested.
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          • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
            Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

            . I lost two sales recently because they were denied during the loan process.

            It kills me, because the total payments are lower than what they're currently paying each month for electricity. They just can't qualify for that lump sum up front. I've been trying to come up with workarounds for that, but each solution is complicated.
            This is tricky.

            There are sub prime mortgage lender that will loan the money (on real estate), with an increase in interest rate. They will also charge a fee for something like no payments for a year.

            I worked one day with a window salesman, and he could have easily sold the prospect a whole house full of windows, but they didn't qualify for the bank loan. I made a few calls and got him financing with a subprime broker. That got the deal.

            The problem is, you work for someone else, and they may resent asking them about getiing better financing alternatives. Believe me, they are available.

            I've met several people who had sales organizations that only had one sourrce of financing, and would lose half their deals, because they didn't have secondary sources of financing.

            When I was selling vacuums in people's homes (with or without a sales organization ) i made sure we had six or seven sources of financing. One prime lender and the rest would finance people with bad credit.

            We would do a credit check in our office (while I was on the phone , in the person's home), and based on the results, we knew where to send the application, and what interest rate we would charge.

            If the person had a job and a phone, I could get them finances. There are fees involved (like paying 15% of the deal to get it financed), but it sure was profitable.

            It's easy to find the sub prime lenders online. It's a huge industry.
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            • Profile picture of the author StevenTylerPjs
              That's what I've wanted to look into. So there options available for the '1st year no payment' deal? That's what really makes it such an attractive offer.

              For that first year, it's an instant 2k savings on average. After that, you're paying less per month than you used to, and it's locked in at a fixed rate.

              We use one lender. I'm not sure how many lenders will loan against solar panels. The loan is against the panels, not the house.

              Of course the better deal is our lender. But if we could get anybody approved... wow. Even with subprime rates, it's a great deal for multiple reasons.

              And a mechanics lein can only be used if you are the actual contractor that does the installation. You could foreclose on the home. Of course that's ruthless. But if we were to finance then ourselves, as a company, it would protect us. Something I've thought about...
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              • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
                Originally Posted by StevenTylerPjs View Post

                That's what I've wanted to look into. So there options available for the '1st year no payment' deal? That's what really makes it such an attractive offer.

                For that first year, it's an instant 2k savings on average. After that, you're paying less per month than you used to, and it's locked in at a fixed rate.

                We use one lender. I'm not sure how many lenders will loan against solar panels. The loan is against the panels, not the house.

                Of course the better deal is our lender. But if we could get anybody approved... wow. Even with subprime rates, it's a great deal for multiple reasons.

                And a mechanics lein can only be used if you are the actual contractor that does the installation. You could foreclose on the home. Of course that's ruthless. But if we were to finance then ourselves, as a company, it would protect us. Something I've thought about...
                Of course you could get a "No payments first year" deal. You would pay a fee for that. I think I paid 15% of the amount financed for it.

                Didn't know about the loan being against the solar panels. Now you're talking about a retail installment loan. And that's what I had selling vacuum cleaners.

                My guess is that if your manager )or the owner) called 10 of his buddies in the business, asking them where they financed their substandard credit customers, he would get several companies.
                Or just Google solar panel finance companies....


                Here's a list...
                https://www.consumeraffairs.com/fina...ew%20Financial.

                Here's a source that finances substandard buyers...
                https://foundationfinance.com/progra...gy-efficiency/

                I'm sure there are several more.

                When they have credit that is bad. I find it far easier to get them to agree to a higher rate and less "No payments" months. They are just glad to get approved. Don't depend entirely on the "No payments for a year" angle. Tell them that there are options.

                By the way, I wouldn't finance them yourselves. You would be waiting forever to break even. Remember, you would only be financing the people with bad credit. Collecting money isn't fun. Trust me.


                Added later; There is a huge difference between;
                One year same as cash
                No interest the first year
                No payments the first year.

                When we sold No payments for the first year, the customer still paid interest that first year. Our fee for "No interest the first year" was to pay the interest ourselves.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

      He didn't ask if they were interested or what they thought or anything. It was a simple straight to the point of do you want this or not.
      Some offers like window cleaning, lawn care, pest removal, are very easy to explain in a few sentences, and the people who are likely to buy...are already thinking about buying the service anyway.

      Some products, like cookware, vacuum cleaners, encyclopedias (remember those), fire alarms, need to be sold in a presentation that's more involved. And the people don't need to be interested before they talk to you.

      In fact, when I sold in people's homes (by referral, appointment, or just knocking on doors)...I think I had one or two people tell me they were actually interested before I did my presentation. Nearly every presentation started with them saying "Well, you can waste your time if you like. But we talked about it, and there is no way we are going to buy anything".

      So an interest in buying isn't necessary in many industries. Like fire alarms.

      In some industries it's helpful. Like life insurance.

      In some industries an interest is needed before you do any kind of presentation. And in many industries, the customers are looking for you as much as you are looking for them, like in pest control.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    We use one lender. I'm not sure how many lenders will loan against solar panels. The loan is against the panels, not the house.

    That is likely a subprime lender who has contracted with the company you sell for. They will approve anyone they possibly can - but even subprime lenders can't approve everyone.


    Your best bet is to ask a few pre-qualifying questions at the front end of your sales presentation - that allows you to pivot to a short presentation if there are financial issues.
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